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  • 1.
    Booth, Shirley
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Wistedt, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Halldén, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Martinsson, Mats
    Marton, Ference
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Paths of learning: the joint constitution of insights1999In: Learning mathematics: from hierarchies to networks / [ed] Leone Burton, London: Falmer Press, 1999, p. 62-89Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Halldén, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Haglund, Liza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Strömdahl, Helge
    Conceptions and contexts: On the interpretation of interview and observational data2007In: Educational psychologist, ISSN 0046-1520, E-ISSN 1532-6985, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 25-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research within a constructivist approach often relies on interview data, which are used to reveal beliefs held by the interviewee or to expose conceptions or conceptual structures that are supposed to reside within the interviewee. From a sociocultural perspective, severe criticism has been leveled against the neglect of the problems of inferring conceptions held by a participant from what is uttered in an interview. Utterances should be looked upon as cultural tools used to realize discursive practices, rather than as propositions mirroring mental entities. It is argued that the clinical interview, often used by constructivists, disregards the impact of a situation and discursive norms with regard to what is uttered in aconversation. Here, it is argued that by taking into account an interviewee's conceptions of the situation, as well as of the subject matter being talked about, some sort of a bridge between the methodological standpoints of constructivism and sociocultural theory can be formed. It is proposed that utterances should be regarded as actions, and thus the problem of ascribing meanings to behavior is in focus, that is, how a series of behaviors can be regarded as an intentional action. It is argued that by means of such an approach, it is possible to make inferences about conceptions and conceptual structures much in the same way as is done in research on conceptual change. However, this means that utterances cannot just be "read off." The interviewee's aims, conceptions of the subject matter talked about,as well as the interviewee's conceptions of the situation to hand must be taken intoaccount. A reinterpretation of data reported by Andrea diSessa and Bruce Sherin is used as an illustration.

  • 3.
    Halldén, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Petersson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Scheja, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Ehrlén, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Haglund, Liza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Österlind, Karolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Stenlund, Agneta
    Situating the concept of conceptual change2002In: Reconsidering conceptual change: Issues in theory and practice, Kluwer (Dordrecht, Netherlands) , 2002, p. 137-48Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Halldén, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Scheja, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Jacobsson-Öhrn, Harriet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Intentionell analys2001Book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Larsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Hallden, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    A Structural View on the Emergence of a Conception: Conceptual Change as Radical Reconstruction of Contexts2010In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 640-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conceptual change is often described as a causal process in which changes in an embraced system of beliefs result in a new system of beliefs. Here, it is argued that conceptual change is better understood as an intentional activity with regard to the learner, that is, what the learner is doing when trying to understand something. Children were interviewed every year during a period of 3 years from their ages of 4-6 years of age. In the study, there were 37 children participating, of which 29 were followed during all 3 years. They were asked to tell about their beliefs about the earth, and their developing understanding is described. The results show that in the conceptual changes the children's main concern was to restructure the often vast amount of knowledge they possessed. This reconstruction is described as a simultaneous reconstruction of conceptual contexts as well as contexts for their application. This also directs the focus of conceptual change from specific conceptions to structural changes.

  • 6.
    Larsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Halldén, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences.
    Coherence and contextualization in the process of conceptual change2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Halldén, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Att prissätta naturen, till vilket pris?: Begreppsförändring och studenters värderingar2007Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Molander, Bengt-Olov
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Halldén, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindahl, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Ambiguity – A tool or obstacle for joint productive dialogue activity in deaf and hearing students’ reasoning about ecology2010In: International Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0883-0355, E-ISSN 1873-538X, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 33-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ambiguity of words and signs as a resource or obstacle in group discussions is studied.How deaf and hearing students aged 13–15 years elaborate on ecological concepts throughdialogue is described. Group interviews were conducted with 14 hearing and 18 deafstudents. Probes were used to initiate discussion about the different meanings ofecological concepts: producer, consumer, nutrients/nutriment, food-chain and cycles. Theresults show that the dialogues are less elaborated for deaf learners than for hearinglearners. It is argued that dialogues between hearing students have a greater chance ofbecoming ‘joint productive activity’, since words in Swedish pave the way for sharedmeaning-making. To deaf learners, differences in connotation between the Swedish wordsand the signs used lead to uncertainty and unproductive lines of reasoning. Oneimplication for instruction is that this bilingual communication needs to be taken intoconsideration to a much greater extent.

  • 9.
    Molander, Bengt-Olov
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Halldén, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindahl, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Ambiguity as a motor for communication – Differences between hearing and deaf students’ ways of reasoning about energy2007In: International Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0883-0355, E-ISSN 1873-538X, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 327-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ambiguity in group discussions as a resource for communication is studied. How students, aged 13–15 years, elaborateon the concept energy through dialogue is described. Group interviews were conducted with 15 hearing and 20 deafstudents. Three probes were used to initiate discussions on different meanings of energy. The results show that thedialogues are less elaborated for deaf learners compared with hearing learners. It is argued that dialogues between hearingstudents have a greater chance of becoming ‘joint productive activity’, since the ambiguity of the word energy in Swedishlays the ground for shared meaning-making. To deaf learners, the ambiguity between the Swedish word and the signs usedproduces uncertainty and puts an end to further dialogue.

  • 10.
    Molander, Bengt-Olov
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Halldén, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Pedersen, Svend
    Understanding a Phenomenon in Two Domains as a Result of Contextualization.2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 115-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study illustrates how contextualization influences students’ reasoning. An experiment on the properties of air was demonstrated with alternative design to two groups of primary students (n=45). Students’ written explanations to the observations show that an experiment in which science equipment and chemicals are used, signify a problem to these students, who have not yet been introduced to different disciplines of school science. We argue that the scientific arrangement of experiments might in fact obstruct students’ sound reasoning in explaining phenomena. In relation to the role as triggers for reasoning scientific equipment call for a more conscious utilization than is often the case in school science.

  • 11.
    Sternäng, Li
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Halldén, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Learning as a process of integration: Students' meaning making of the enhanced greenhouse effectManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Students' interpretation of the enhanced greenhouse effect are focused on in this paper. The analysis of the empirical data was conducted from an intentional perspective. The students were 14 years old and studied at Green Schools in the Beijing area. The results show that students set up reasonal causal links among diversely different pieces of knowledge. It is argued that these coherent wholes that were set up by students, even if wrong, can be regarded as a step towards models more acceptable from normative point of view.

  • 12.
    Österlind, Karolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Halldén, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Linking theory to practice.: A case study of pupils’ course work on freshwater pollution2007In: International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education, ISSN 1038-2046, E-ISSN 1747-7611, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 73-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses the study which examines the learning of five pupils aged 13-14 years old on freshwater pollution and related theoretical concepts. It devotes to fieldwork conducted at a polluted lake and other practical activities to promote the pupils' understanding of the central concepts in the study of freshwater pollution. Results indicate that the pupils do not seem to make the connection between the theoretical concepts and the practical context, however, they interpret the concepts within separate practical concepts. In addition, the study shows that contextualization is the main factor on pupil's difficulty in understanding theoretical concepts.

1 - 12 of 12
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