Change search
Refine search result
1 - 33 of 33
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    André, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Bruzell, Susanna
    Centrum för miljö- och klimatforskning, Lunds universitet.
    Gerger Swartling, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    Lagergren, Fredrik
    Vulturius, Gregor
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Blennow, Kristina
    Carlsen, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Engström, Kerstin
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Lindeskog, Mats
    Olsson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Klimatanpassat skogsbruk: drivkrafter, risker och möjligheter : Mistra-SWECIA syntesrapport2015Report (Other academic)
  • 2. Blanchard, Olivier
    et al.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Flam, Harry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Makroekonomi2015Book (Other academic)
  • 3. Engström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Lindeskog, Mats
    Olin, Stefan
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Smith, Benjamin
    Impacts of climate mitigation strategies in the energy sector on global land use and carbon balance2017In: Earth System Dynamics, ISSN 2190-4979, E-ISSN 2190-4987, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 773-799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing greenhouse gas emissions to limit damage to the global economy climate-change-induced and secure the livelihoods of future generations requires ambitious mitigation strategies. The introduction of a global carbon tax on fossil fuels is tested here as a mitigation strategy to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations and radiative forcing. Taxation of fossil fuels potentially leads to changed composition of energy sources, including a larger relative contribution from bioenergy. Further, the introduction of a mitigation strategy reduces climate-change-induced damage to the global economy, and thus can indirectly affect consumption patterns and investments in agricultural technologies and yield enhancement. Here we assess the implications of changes in bioenergy demand as well as the indirectly caused changes in consumption and crop yields for global and national cropland area and terrestrial biosphere carbon balance. We apply a novel integrated assessment modelling framework, combining three previously published models (a climate-economy model, a socio-economic land use model and an ecosystem model). We develop reference and mitigation scenarios based on the narratives and key elements of the shared socio-economic pathways (SSPs). Taking emissions from the land use sector into account, we find that the introduction of a global carbon tax on the fossil fuel sector is an effective mitigation strategy only for scenarios with low population development and strong sustainability criteria (SSP1 Taking the green road). For scenarios with high population growth, low technological development and bioenergy production the high demand for cropland causes the terrestrial biosphere to switch from being a carbon sink to a source by the end of the 21st century.

  • 4. Golosov, Mikhail
    et al.
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Tsyvinski, Aleh
    Optimal Taxes on Fossil Fuel in General Equilibrium2014In: Econometrica, ISSN 0012-9682, E-ISSN 1468-0262, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 41-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze a dynamic stochastic general-equilibrium (DSGE) model with an externality—through climate change—from using fossil energy. Our central result is a simple formula for the marginal externality damage of emissions (or, equivalently, for the optimal carbon tax). This formula, which holds under quite plausible assumptions, reveals that the damage is proportional to current GDP, with the proportion depending only on three factors: (i) discounting, (ii) the expected damage elasticity (how many percent of the output flow is lost from an extra unit of carbon in the atmosphere), and (iii) the structure of carbon depreciation in the atmosphere. Thus, the stochastic values of future output, consumption, and the atmospheric CO2 concentration, as well as the paths of technology (whether endogenous or exogenous) and population, and so on, all disappear from the formula. We find that the optimal tax should be a bit higher than the median, or most well-known, estimates in the literature. We also formulate a parsimonious yet comprehensive and easily solved model allowing us to compute the optimal and market paths for the use of different sources of energy and the corresponding climate change. We find coal—rather than oil—to be the main threat to economic welfare, largely due to its abundance. We also find that the costs of inaction are particularly sensitive to the assumptions regarding the substitutability of different energy sources and technological progress.

  • 5.
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Are they Swinging Together?: A Measure of Linear Comovement with an Application to Swedish and Foreign Business Cycles1993Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A frequency band specific measure of the degree of linear comovement that does not need any assumptions about the structure of the dependence except linearity is defined. The distribution of the measure is simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The sensitivity of the distributions to the characteristics of the underlying processes is substantially reduced if low frequencies, for example the Hodrick-Prescott filter, may be dominated by the behavior at low frequencies. Explicit treatment of different frequency bands may then be preferable. The measure of linear comovement is applied to Swedish and foreign macro time series spanning the period 1861 to 1988. A substantial degree of comovement between Swedish consumption related variables and foreign GDP is found while Swedish GDP and manufacturing production is clearly less covariant with foreign GDP.

  • 6.
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Democratic Public Good Provision2007In: Journal of Economic Theory, Vol. 133, no 1, p. 127-151Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Regime Shifts and Volatility Spillovers in Internationel Stock Markets1995Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A standard capital asset pricing model is extended to allow for stochastic shifts in the volatility of the news process. This model is then estimated on bivariate stock market data to separate two exogenous news processes - a world and a domestic. The results indicate that the influence of the world news process on the Swedish stock market has increased significantly over the period 1970-1995. I also find that the foreign influence is much stronger when the volatility of the world news process is high. Furthermore, when the world state shifts to high risk, the Swedish stock market immediately reacts by a large fall, estimated to 7.0%. The bivariate model is also  estimated on a set of other national stock markets.

  • 8.
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Variations in Risk: A Cause of Fluctuations in Demand?1993Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a common belief, both among economists and non-economists, that consumers' perception of the riskiness of their future real income is important for economic activity. Studies of the effects of risk on demand have generally assumed away transaction costs. This is critical assumption. Risk in conjunction with transaction costs will give rise to irreversibility effect that are likely to be quantatively important explanations for fluctuations in the demand for duarbles. I will show that the sensitivity for demand to variations in income risk is likely to be much higher for durables than for non-durables. Consumers' perception about the risk facing them presumable varies systematically over the business cycle. Irreversibility effects can then be an important business cycles mechanism. I will present a model in which agents know that the risk of income shocks varies stochastically as opposed to the standard procedure of doing comparative statistics. For durables that are renewed every five years, a temporary increase in the unemployment risk from one to ten percent per year causes  the demand for duarbles to vanish for 3,5 months. The demand then stabilizes at a level 5% lower than before the increase in risk. Furthermore, I show that in contrast to the demand for non-durables, the fall in the demand for durables is larger the shorter the expected duration of the high risk period.

  • 9.
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Variations in Risk as a Cause of Fluctuations in Demand: The Empirics1993Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previous paper (Hassler, 1993) I have extended a standard irreversible investment model to the case when risk if known to stochastically fluctuate between two levels. The model is able to generate substantial fluctuations in durables demand if the level of risk is volatile enough. In this paper I estimate a model where risk, defined as the volatility of wealth, fluctuates between two levels. The risk levels and the transition probabilities are estimated using a maximum likelihood method and US aggregate data. Thereafter the likelihood that the U.S. economy is in the high risk state is estimated for each month from 1959 and 1992. These likelihoods are then used to predict the relative level of durables demand. Durables demand is found to be sensitive to the level of financial volatility. A shift to the high level of financial volatility cause an immediate fall in durables purchases of approximately 3%. Car purchases fall by around 7%. The dynamic response to shifts in risk, is not found to be in line with an irreversibility model with only two levels of risk.

  • 10.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    ECONOMICS AND CLIMATE CHANGE: INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT IN A MULTI-REGION WORLD2012In: Journal of the European Economic Association, ISSN 1542-4766, E-ISSN 1542-4774, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 974-1000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops a model that integrates the climate and the global economyan integrated assessment modelwith which different policy scenarios can be analyzed and compared. The model is a dynamic stochastic general-equilibrium setup with a continuum of regions. Thus, it is a full stochastic general-equilibrium version of RICE, Nordhauss pioneering multi-region integrated assessment model. Like RICE, our model features traded fossil fuel but otherwise has no markets across regionsthere is no insurance nor any intertemporal trade across them. The extreme form of market incompleteness is not fully realistic but arguably not a bad approximation of reality. Its major advantage is that, along with a set of reasonable assumptions on preferences, technology, and nature, it allows a closed-form model solution. We use the model to assess the welfare consequences of carbon taxes that differ across as well as within oil-consuming and -producing regions. We show that, surprisingly, only taxes on oil producers can improve the climate: taxes on oil consumers have no effect at all. The calibrated model suggests large differences in views on climate policy across regions.

  • 11.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Klimatet och ekonomin2013In: SNS Analys, no 14, p. 1-16Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    The Climate and the Economy2013Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Nycander, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
    Climate policy2015In: Economic Policy: A European Forum, ISSN 0266-4658, E-ISSN 1468-0327, Vol. 31, no 87, p. 503-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper makes suggestions for climate policy and defends them based on recent research in economics and the natural sciences. In summary: (i) the optimal carbon tax is rather modest; (ii) the key climate threat is coal; (iii) a carbon tax is to be preferred over a quantity-based system; (iv) the optimal tax on carbon does not appreciably harm growth; (v) subsidies to green technology are beneficial for the climate only to the extent that they make green technology outcompete coal; and (vi) a carbon tax is politically feasible.

  • 14.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Olovsson, Conny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Oil Monopoly and the Climate2010In: The American Economic Review, ISSN 0002-8282, E-ISSN 1944-7981, Vol. 100, no 2, p. 460-464Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Shifa, Abdulaziz B.
    Spiro, Daniel
    Should Developing Countries Constrain Resource-Income Spending? A Quantitative Analysis of Oil Income in Uganda2017In: Energy Journal, ISSN 0195-6574, E-ISSN 1944-9089, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 103-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large increase in government spending following resource discoveries often entails political risks, inefficient investments and increased volatility. Setting up a sovereign wealth fund with a clear spending constraint may decrease these risks. On the other hand, in a capital scarce developing economy with limited access to international borrowing, such a spending constraint may lower welfare by reducing domestic capital accumulation and hindering consumption increases for the currently poor. These two contradicting considerations pose a dilemma for policy makers in deciding whether to set up a sovereign wealth fund with a spending constraint. Using Uganda's recent oil discovery as a case study, this paper presents a quantitative macroeconomic analysis and examines the potential loss of constraining spending through a sovereign wealth fund with a simple spending rule. We find that the loss is relatively low and unlikely to dominate the political risks associated with increased oil spending. Thus, such a spending constraint appears well warranted.

  • 16.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Shifa, Abdulaziz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Spiro, Daniel
    Ugandan oil - a blessing or a curse?2013Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Centre for Economic Policy Research, United Kingdom .
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Centre for Economic Policy Research, United Kingdom; National Bureau of Economic Research, United States.
    Smith Jr, Anthony A. A.
    Chapter 24 – Environmental Macroeconomics2016In: Handbook of Macroeconomics: Volume 2 B / [ed] John B. Taylor, Harald Uhlig, Elsevier, 2016, p. 1893-2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss climate change and resource scarcity from the perspective of macroeconomic modeling and quantitative evaluation. Our focus is on climate change: we build a very simple “integrated assessment model,” ie, a model that integrates the global economy and the climate in a unified framework. Such a model has three key modules: the climate, the carbon cycle, and the economy. We provide a description of how to build tractable and yet realistic modules of the climate and the carbon cycle. The baseline economic model, then, is static but has a macroeconomic structure, ie, it has the standard features of modern macroeconomic analysis. Thus, it is quantitatively specified and can be calibrated to obtain an approximate social cost of carbon. The static model is then used to illustrate a number of points that have been made in the broad literature on climate change. Our chapter begins, however, with a short discussion of resource scarcity—also from the perspective of standard macroeconomic modeling—offering a dynamic framework of analysis and stating the key challenges. Our last section combines resource scarcity and the integrated assessment setup within a fully dynamic general equilibrium model with uncertainty. That model delivers positive and normative quantitative implications and can be viewed as a platform for macroeconomic analysis of climate change and sustainability issues more broadly.

  • 18.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Zilibotti, Fabrizio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Storesletten, Kjetil
    On the Optimal Timing of Capital Taxation2008In: Journal of Monetary Economics, ISSN 0304-3932, Vol. 55, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Intergenerational Risk Sharing, Stability and Optimality of Alternative Pension Systems1997Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In an analysis of the risk-sharing properties of different types of pension systems, we show that only a fixed-fee pay-as-you-go (PAYG) pension systems can provide intergenerational risk sharing for living individuals. Under some circumstances, however, other PAYG pensions systems can enhance the expected welfare of all generations by reducing intergenerational income variability. We derive conditions for this to occur. We also analyze the stability of actuarially far PAYG pensions systems. It is shown that if an actuarially fair pension with a non-balanced budget system is dynamically stable, its accumulated surpluses will converge to the same fund as in a fully funded system. We also show that the welfare loss due to labor market distortions will, surprisingly, increase if the implicit marginal return in a compulsory system raised above the average return.

  • 20.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Optimal Actuarial Fairness in Pension Systems1996Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A rationale for a compulsory pension system is that the government wants to correct supposedly myopic behavior by the individuals. Given such a system, we calculate the optimal relation between marginal contributions and benefits, i.e., the optimal degree of marginal actuarial fairness, for the individuals or for the government. We show that the optimal degree of marginal actuarial fairness increases in the rate of return in the social security system and also decreases in the government's rate of time preference. It is also shown that labor supple always increases when the link between marginal contributions and benefits is strengthened.

  • 21.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Mora, Jose V. Rodriguez
    Zeira, Joseph
    Inequality and mobility2007In: Journal of economic growth (Boston), ISSN 1381-4338, E-ISSN 1573-7020, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 235-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acknowledging that wage inequality and intergenerational mobility are strongly interrelated, this paper presents a model in which both are jointly determined. The model enables us to study how inequality and mobility are affected by exogenous changes and what determines their correlation. A main implication of the model is that differences in the amount of public subsidies to education and educational quality produce cross-country patterns with a negative correlation between inequality and mobility. Differences in the labor market, like differences in skill-biased technology or wage compression instead produce a positive correlation. The predictions of the model are found to be consistent with various empirical observations on mobility and inequality.

  • 22.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Rodríguez Mora, José V.
    Department of Economics, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona, Spain).
    IQ, Social Mobility and Growth1998Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Intelligent agents may contribute to higher technological growth, if assigned appropriate positions in the economy. These positive effects on growth are unlikely to be internalized ona competitive labor market. The allocation of talent depends on the relative award the market assigns to intelligence versus other individual merits, which will alos influence intergenerational social mobility. To illustrate this, we present an endogenous growth model where each agent can choose to be a worker or an entrepeneur. The reward to entrepeneurs is an endogenous function of the abilities they have been endowed by nature as well as of the amount of knowledge and other social assets they inherit from their parents. When growth is low, the equilibrium in the labor market implies that the reward to entrepeneurs, which will cause low intergenerational social mobility and an inefficient allocation of human resources and, consequently, low growth. On the other hand, there is also a stable equilibrium with high growth  which mitigates the inefficiencies generated by the labor market and implies high intergenerational social mobility.

  • 23.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Rodríguez Mora, José V.
    Unemployment Insurance Design: How to Induce Moving and Retraining2008In: European Economic Review, ISSN 0014-2921, Vol. 52, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Rodríguez Mora, José V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Storesletten, Kjetil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Zilibotti, Fabrizio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Equilibrium Unemployment Insurance1999Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we incorporate a positive theory of unemployment insurance into a dynamic overlapping generations model with search-matching frictions and on-the-job learning-by-doing. The model shows that societies populated by identical rational agents, but differing in the initial distribution of human capital across agents, may choose very different unemployment insurance levels in a politico-economic equilibrium. The interaction between the political decision about the level of the unemployment insurance and the optimal search behavior of the unemployed gives rise to a self-reinforcing mechanism which may generate multiple stady-state equillibria. In particular, a European-type steady-state with high unemployment, low employment turnover and high insurance can co-exist with an American-type steady-state with low unemployment, high employment turnover and low unemployment insurance. A calibrated version of the model features two distinct steady-state equilibria with unemployment levels and duration rates resembling those of the U.S. and Europe, respectively.

  • 25.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Rodríguez Mora, José Vicente
    Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    Storesletten, Kjetil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Zilibotti, Fabrizio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    A Positive Theory of Geographic Mobility and Social Insurance2002Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    this paper presents a tractable dynamic general equilibrium model that can explain cross-country empirical regularities in geographical mobility, unemployment and labor market institutions. Rational agents vote over unemployment insurance (UI), taking the dynamic distortionary effects of insurance on the performance of the labor market into consideration. Agents with higher cost of moving, i.e., more attached to their current location, prefer more generous UI. The key assumption is that an agent's attachment to a location increases the longer she has resided there. UI reduces the incentive for labor mobility and increases, therefore, the fraction of attached agents and the political support for UI. The main result is that this self-reinforcing mechanism can give rise to multiple steady-states - one "European" steady-state featuring high unemployment, low geographical mobility and high unemployment insurance, and one "American" steady-state featuring low unemployment, high mobility and low unemployment insurance.

  • 26.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Rodríguez Mora, José Vicente
    Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    Storesletten, Kjetil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Zilibotti, Fabrizio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    The Survival of the Welfare State2002Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an analytical chracterization of Markov perfect equilibria in a politico-economic model with repeated voting, where agents vote over distortionary incom redistribution. The key feature of the theory is that the future constituency of redistributive policies depends positively on the current level of redistribution, since this affects both private investments and the future distribution of voters. Agents vote rationally and fully anticipate the effects of their political choice on both private incentives and future voting outcomes. The model features multiple equilibria. In "pro-welfare" equilibria, both welfare state policies and their effects on distribution persist forever. In "anti-welfare equilibria", eben a majority of beneficiaries of redistributive policies vote strategically so as to induce formation of a future majority that will vote for zero redistribution.

  • 27.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Sinn, Hans-Werner
    The fossil episode2016In: Journal of Monetary Economics, ISSN 0304-3932, E-ISSN 1873-1295, Vol. 83, p. 14-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agriculture sector output (biocarbon) is a good substitute for oil in energy production but oil cannot be used as food. This one-way substitutability is analyzed in a dynamic general equilibrium model. It features three endogenous phases: a pure fossil, a mixed fossil and biocarbon and an absorbing biocarbon fuel only phase. In the latter two, the demand for biocarbon as fuel leads to increasing food prices. Depending on how easily capital and labor can reallocate, food prices increase by between 40% and 240%. The model is also used to analyze climate consequences of biocarbon fuel polices and of the shale revolution.

  • 28.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Sinn, Hans-Werner
    The Fossile Episode2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    We build a two-sector dynamic general equilibrium model with one-sided substitutability between fossil carbon and biocarbon. One shock only, the discovery of the technology to use fossil fuels, leads to a transition from an initial pre-industrial phase to three following ohases: a pure fossil carbon phase, a mixed fossil and biocarbon phase and an absorbing biocarbon phase. The increased competition for biocarbon during phase 3 and 4 leads to increasing food prices. We provide closed form expressions for this price increase. Our calibration leads to a price increase of 40% if capital and labor are allowed to move to the biocarbon sector. Otherwise, the price increase is much higher. We also use the model to analyze the consequences of restrictions on using biocarbon as fuel. We show that such restrictions can lead to a substantially slower global warming due to an endogenous slowdown of fossil fuel extraction.

  • 29.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Storesletten, Kjetil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Zilibotti, Fabrizio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Democratic Public Good Provision2007In: Journal of Economic Theory, Vol. 133, no 1, p. 127-151Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Hassler, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Vicente Rodríguez Mora, José
    Department of Economics, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona, Spain).
    Employment Turnover and Unemployment Insurance1997Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two features distinguish European and US labor markets. First, most European countries have substantially more generous unemployment insurance. Second, the duration of unemployment and employment spells are substantially higher in Europe - employment turnover is lower. We show that self-insruance, i.e., saving and borrowing, is a good substitute for unemployment insurance when turnover is high as in US. If the insurance system is less than perfectly actuarilly fair, the employed median voter he will then prefer to self-insure instead of having unemployment insurance if turnover is high. We also show high unemployment insurance make unemployed more willing to wait for a job with low separation rates. This could make both high turnover/low insurance (US) and low turnover/high insurance (Europe) stable equilibria. Low turnover also leads to a strong divergence between the long and short run interest of the employed.- In absence of devices such that the median voter can bind future voters to some level of insurance, the voting cycle must thus be long in order to support a high level of insurance.

  • 31.
    Persson, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Persson, Torsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    2015 års Ekonomipris till Angus Deaton2015In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 8, p. 6-16Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32. Rummukainen, Markku
    et al.
    Gerger Swartling, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Löwendahl, Elin
    Wallgren, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Smith, Ben
    Mistra SWECIA annual report 2011. pp. 7-8: The climate change adaptation landscape2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33. Sturm, Jan-Egbert
    et al.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Corsetti, Giancarlo
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Saint-Paul, Gilles
    Valentinyi, Ákos
    Vives, Xavier
    Sinn, Hans-Werner
    The EEAG Report on the European Economy 20122012Report (Other academic)
1 - 33 of 33
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf