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  • 1.
    Azad, Azade
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ginner Hau, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Karlsson, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Adolescent Female Offenders’ Subjective Experiences of How Peers Influence Norm-Breaking Behavior2018In: Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, ISSN 0738-0151, E-ISSN 1573-2797, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 257-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Delinquent peers have a strong influence on adolescent delinquent behavior. However, few studies have investigated adolescents’, and in particular young females’, own perspectives of the role of peers on their delinquent behavior. The purpose of the present study was to explore how young female offenders described their delinquent behavior and more specifically the role they assign to peer relations in committing or avoiding delinquent acts. Nine female adolescents, sentenced to youth service, were interviewed, and the data was analyzed using the Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR) method. The results showed that committing crimes and taking drugs with peers were portrayed as a way for the female delinquents to socialize. Delinquent and pro-social activities with peers appear to serve similar developmental functions in the sense that it is described to fulfill the same developmental needs. The young offenders also described collectively created pressures and norms in the peer group as the main contributing factor to their norm-breaking behavior, where they described being both recipients and producers of influence in the group. Another important finding was that the female offenders showed an awareness of the importance of pro-social peers and the need to eliminate delinquent friends from their peer network in order to help them refrain from deviant behavior. Implications for prevention and intervention are discussed.

  • 2.
    Eninger, Lilianne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Eichas, Kyle
    Allodi Westling, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Smedler, Ann-Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Olsson, Tina
    Sedem, Mina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Ginnner Hau, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Herkner, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Domitrovic, Celene
    Culture and Young Children’s Social Emotional Competence: Findings and Implications for the Cultural Adaptation of Interventions2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Ginner Hau, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Swedish young offenders in community-based rehabilitative programmes: Patterns of antisocial behaviour, mental health, and recidivism2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to explore patterns of antisocial behaviour, mental health and recidivism among Swedish young offenders in community-based rehabilitative programmes (n=189). Study I explored the character and severity of self-reported behavioural problems prior to programme participation.  Four distinct subgroups were identified: subgroup (SG) 1 (n=60), boys exhibiting adolescent delinquency; SG 2 (n=65), boys exhibi­ting pronounced adolescent delinquency; SG 3 (n=48), boys exhibiting pronounced adolescent delinquency as well as criminality including violence; SG 4 (n=16), boys exhibiting pronounced adolescent delinquency as well as criminality including violence and drug-related crimes.

    Study II investigated the mental health of the participants, by means of the Strengths and Difficulty Questionnaire (SDQ). When relating SDQ-scores to the previously identified subgroups, SG 1 with the least prominent history of antisocial behaviour was found to resemble a normative sample, while the subgroups with more extensive histories of antisocial behaviour had significantly elevated scores on the hyperactivity/inattention and conduct problem scales.

    Study III investigated recidivism in criminality in the 18-months following programme start, finding that 60% of the participants had been registered as suspected of new crimes. SG 3 and 4 with the most extensive histories of antisocial behaviour were responsible for a significantly larger part of recidivism than expected. By contrast, SG 1, reporting the least antisocial behaviour in their past, was responsible for a significantly smaller part of the recidivism. This was true for all crimes as well as crimes of violence specifically, confirming the subgroups identified based on the self-reports.

    The results are related to developmental theories of antisocial behaviour and to contemporary research on risk assessment. Implications for the practice of rehabilitation of convicted young offenders are discussed. 

  • 4.
    Ginner Hau, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Smedler, Ann-Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Recidivism in convicted young offenders participating in community-based rehabilitative programmes: 18-month follow-up of 189 Swedish male offendersIn: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recidivism over 18 months was investigated in a representative group of Swedish male offenders, 15-17 years old, who had been referred to community based rehabilitative programmes (n=189). Also, registry data on earlier contacts with social services and previous convictions was collected.  Eighteen months after programme start, 60% of the young offenders were registered as suspected of new crimes, 48% for crime of violence.  Previous contacts with social services had been documented for 44%, and 30% were registered as previously convicted. However, the group was highly heterogeneous, and all registry data corresponded well with self-reported history of antisocial behaviour collected at programme start, by which three subgroups (n=60, 64 and 64, respectively)  with significantly different problem profiles had been identified. Results are discussed in relation to developmental theories of antisocial development, and the need to adher o the risk principle when designing interventions for young offenders. 

  • 5.
    Ginner Hau, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Smedler, Ann-Charlotte
    Self-reported strengths and difficulties in Swedish young offenders in community-based rehabilitative programmesIn: Child & Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health was investigated in a representative group of Swedish male offenders, 15-17 years of age,  referred to community based rehabilitative programmes (n=188). Self -report scores of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) were compared to those of a norm group, for the entire sample and for three subgroups with different levels of antisocial behaviour. The young offenders reported elevated levels of total difficulties, conduct problems and hyperactivity/inattention, significantly more scores in the clinical range and more negative impact on everyday life. The heterogeneity was substantial, and the subgroup with the most extensive history of antisocial behaviour was largely responsible for the overall results. Screening for mental health should be part of routine assessment, particularly in youths with extensive histories of antisocial behaviour.

  • 6.
    Ginnner Hau, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Smedler, Ann-Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Different problems – same treatment: Swedish juvenile offenders in community-based rehabilitative programmes2011In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young delinquents may be regarded as children in need of rehabilitation or as offenders deserving of consequences proportional to the committed crime. The focus has increasingly been on the latter, while research shows that individual risk assessment is essential for effective rehabilitation. This study explored self-reported history of antisocial behaviour among Swedish male offenders 15-17 years of age (n=189) who were sentenced to participate in rehabilitative programmes conducted by local social services. Antisocial behaviour was extensive and, according to a principal component analysis, consisted of three dimensions: (i) adolescent delinquency; (ii) violence and theft, (iii) drug-related crimes. Using cluster analysis, the participants were divided into four subgroups representing different levels and characteristics of delinquency, which explained 73 per cent of the variance in antisocial behaviour. The conclusion is that assignment to rehabilitative programmes appeared unrelated to subgroups, i.e. to risk level. Organisational obstacles to an evidence based practice are discussed.

  • 7.
    Ginnner Hau, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Smedler, Ann-Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Young male offenders in community-based rehabilitative programmes: Self-reported history of antisocial behaviour predicts recidivism2011In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 413-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recidivism over 18 months was investigated in a representative group of young Swedish male offenders, 15-17 years old, referred to community-based rehabilitative programmes (n = 189). Registry data on their earlier contacts with social services and previous convictions were also collected. Eighteen months after programme start, 60 per cent of the young offenders were registered as suspected of new crimes, 48 per cent were registered for crimes of violence. Previous contacts with the social services had been documented for 44 per cent, and 30 per cent were registered as previously convicted. However, the group was highly heterogeneous, and all registry data corresponded well with self-reported history of antisocial behaviour collected at the start of the programme, which identified three subgroups (n = 60, 65 and 64, respectively) with significantly different problem profiles. Results are discussed in relation to developmental theories of antisocial development and the need to adhere to the risk principle when designing interventions for young offenders.

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