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  • 1.
    Ariöz, Candan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Götzke, Hansjörg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lindholm, Ljubica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Eriksson, Jonny
    Edwards, Katarina
    Daley, Daniel O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Barth, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wieslander, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Heterologous overexpression of a monotopic glucosyltransferase (MGS) induces fatty acid remodeling in Escherichia coli membranes:  2014In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes, ISSN 0005-2736, E-ISSN 1879-2642, Vol. 1838, no 7, p. 1862-1870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The membrane protein monoglucosyldiacylglycerol synthase (MGS) from Acholeplasma laidlawii is responsible for the creation of intracellular membranes when overexpressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli). The present study investigates time dependent changes in composition and properties of E. coli membranes during 22 h of MGS induction. The lipid/protein ratio increased by 38% in MGS-expressing cells compared to control cells. Time-dependent screening of lipids during this period indicated differences in fatty acid modeling. (1) Unsaturation levels remained constant for MGS cells (~ 62%) but significantly decreased in control cells (from 61% to 36%). (2) Cyclopropanated fatty acid content was lower in MGS producing cells while control cells had an increased cyclopropanation activity. Among all lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was detected to be the most affected species in terms of cyclopropanation. Higher levels of unsaturation, lowered cyclopropanation levels and decreased transcription of the gene for cyclopropane fatty acid synthase (CFA) all indicate the tendency of the MGS protein to force E. coli membranes to alter its usual fatty acid composition.

  • 2.
    Ariöz, Candan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ye, Weihua
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    al Bakali, Amin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ge, Changrong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Liebau, Jobst
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Götzke, Hansjörg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Barth, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wieslander, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mäler, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Anionic Lipid Binding to the Foreign Protein MGS Provides a Tight Coupling between Phospholipid Synthesis and Protein Overexpression in Escherichia coli2013In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 52, no 33, p. 5533-5544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Certain membrane proteins involved in lipid synthesis can induce formation of new intracellular membranes in Escherichia coli, i.e., intracellular vesicles. Among those, the foreign monotopic glycosyltransferase MGS from Acholeplasma laidlawii triggers such massive lipid synthesis when overexpressed. To examine the mechanism behind the increased lipid synthesis, we investigated the lipid binding properties of MGS in vivo together with the correlation between lipid synthesis and MGS overexpression levels. A good correlation between produced lipid quantities and overexpressed MGS protein was observed when standard LB medium was supplemented with four different lipid precursors that have significant roles in the lipid biosynthesis pathway. Interestingly, this correlation was highest concerning anionic lipid production and at the same time dependent on the selective binding of anionic lipid molecules by MGS. A selective interaction with anionic lipids was also observed in vitro by P-31 NMR binding studies using bicelles prepared with E. coli lipids. The results clearly demonstrate that the discriminative withdrawal of anionic lipids, especially phosphatidylglycerol, from the membrane through MGS binding triggers an in vivo signal for cells to create a feed-forward stimulation of lipid synthesis in E. coil. By this mechanism, cells can produce more membrane surface in order to accommodate excessively produced MGS molecules, which results in an interdependent cycle of lipid and MGS protein synthesis.

  • 3.
    Götzke, Hansjörg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Protein trafficking in the cell envelope of Escherichia coli: Identification and characterisation of a novel chaperone2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria, like Escherichia coli, is composed of a cytoplasmic membrane, a periplasmic space containing a peptidoglycan layer and an outer membrane. About 30 % of all proteins are localised in the cell envelope. These proteins have to be inserted into or translocated across the inner membrane by the SecYEG translocon. They are then chaperoned to their final destination by a network of chaperones. The broad aim of this work was to provide a better understanding of protein trafficking through the bacterial cell envelope. We have identified a novel membrane protein complex consisting of the periplasmic chaperone PpiD and the uncharacterised protein YfgM. Both are anchored in the inner membrane and have periplasmic domains. By co-immunoprecipitations and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis it could be demonstrated that YfgM and PpiD form a supercomplex with the SecYEG translocon. Furthermore, a chemical-genetic approach showed that YfgM is part of the periplasmic chaperone network that is essential for envelope protein biogenesis. Moreover, it could be shown that YfgM is required for the stability of the periplasmic chaperone HdeB. Finally, evidence that YfgM might also be involved in the lateral insertion of transmembrane domains was provided. In summary, this thesis details the identification and characterisation of a novel ancillary subunit of the SecYEG translocon that is involved in the periplasmic chaperone network in the cell envelope of Escherichia coli.

  • 4.
    Götzke, Hansjörg
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Muheim, Claudio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Altelaar, A. F. Maarten
    Heck, Albert J. R.
    Maddalo, Gianluca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Utrecht University, The Netherlands; Netherlands Proteomics Centre, The Netherlands.
    Daley, Daniel O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Identification of Putative Substrates for the Periplasmic Chaperone YfgM in Escherichia coli Using Quantitative Proteomics2015In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 216-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How proteins are trafficked, folded, and assembled into functional units in the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria is of significant interest. A number of chaperones have been identified, however, the molecular roles of these chaperones are often enigmatic because it has been challenging to assign substrates. Recently we discovered a novel periplasmic chaperone, called YfgM, which associates with PpiD and the SecYEG translocon and operates in a network that contains Skp and SurA. The aim of the study presented here was to identify putative substrates of YfgM. We reasoned that substrates would be incorrectly folded or trafficked when YfgM was absent from the cell, and thus more prone to proteolysis (the loss-of-function rationale). We therefore used a comparative proteomic approach to identify cell envelope proteins that were lower in abundance in a strain lacking yfgM, and strains lacking yfgM together with either skp or surA. Sixteen putative substrates were identified. The list contained nine inner membrane proteins (CusS, EvgS, MalF, OsmC, TdcB, TdcC, WrbA, YfhB, and YtfH) and seven periplasmic proteins (HdeA, HdeB, AnsB, Ggt, MalE, YcgK, and YnjE), but it did not include any lipoproteins or outer membrane proteins. Significantly, AnsB (an asparaginase) and HdeB (a protein involved in the acid stress response), were lower in abundance in all three strains lacking yfgM. For both genes, we ruled out the possibility that they were transcriptionally down-regulated, so it is highly likely that the corresponding proteins are misfolded/mistargeted and turned-over in the absence of YfgM. For HdeB we validated this conclusion in a pulse-chase experiment. The identification of HdeB and other cell envelope proteins as potential substrates will be a valuable resource for follow-up experiments that aim to delineate molecular the function of YfgM.

  • 5.
    Götzke, Hansjörg
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Palombo, Isolde
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Muheim, Claudio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Perrody, Elsa
    Genevaux, Pierre
    Kudva, Renuka
    Müller, Matthias
    Daley, Daniel O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    YfgM Is an Ancillary Subunit of the SecYEG Translocon in Escherichia coli2014In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 289, no 27, p. 19089-19097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein secretion in Gram-negative bacteria is essential for both cell viability and pathogenesis. The vast majority of secreted proteins exit the cytoplasm through a transmembrane conduit called the Sec translocon in a process that is facilitated by ancillary modules, such as SecA, SecDF-YajC, YidC, and PpiD. In this study we have characterized YfgM, a protein with no annotated function. We found it to be a novel ancillary subunit of the Sec translocon as it co-purifies with both PpiD and the SecYEG translocon after immunoprecipitation and blue native/SDS-PAGE. Phenotypic analyses of strains lacking yfgM suggest that its physiological role in the cell overlaps with the periplasmic chaperones SurA and Skp. We, therefore, propose a role for YfgM in mediating the trafficking of proteins from the Sec translocon to the periplasmic chaperone network that contains SurA, Skp, DegP, PpiD, and FkpA.

  • 6.
    Kudva, Renuka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Götzke, Hansjörg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    YfgM plays a role in protein insertion through the SecYEG transloconManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Maddalo, Gianluca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Stenberg-Bruzell, Filippa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Götzke, Hansjörg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Toddo, Stephen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Patrik, Björkholm
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Eriksson, Hanna
    Chovanec, Peter
    Genevaux, Pierre
    Lehtiö, Janne
    Ilag, Leopold L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Daley, Daniel O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Systematic Analysis of Native Membrane Protein Complexes in Escherichia coli2011In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 1848-1859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cell envelope of Escherichia coli is an essential structure that modulates exchanges between the cell and the extra-cellular milieu. Previous proteomic analyses have suggested that it contains a significant number of proteins with no annotated function. To gain insight into these proteins and the general organization of the cell envelope proteome, we have carried out a systematic analysis of native membrane protein complexes. We have identified 30 membrane protein complexes (6 of which are novel) and present reference maps that can be used for cell envelope profiling. In one instance, we identified a protein with no annotated function (YfgM) in a complex with a well-characterized periplasmic chaperone (PpiD). Using the guilt by association principle, we suggest that YfgM is also part of the periplasmic chaperone network. The approach we present circumvents the need for engineering of tags and protein overexpression. It is applicable for the analysis of membrane protein complexes in any organism and will be particularly useful for less-characterized organisms where conventional strategies that require protein engineering (i.e., 2-hybrid based approaches and TAP-tagging) are not feasible.

  • 8. Norell, Derrick
    et al.
    Heuck, Alexander
    Tran-Thi, Thuy-Anh
    Götzke, Hansjörg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jacob-Dubuisson, Francoise
    Clausen, Tim
    Daley, Daniel O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Braun, Volkmar
    Mueller, Matthias
    Fan, Enguo
    Versatile in vitro system to study translocation and functional integration of bacterial outer membrane proteins2014In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 5, p. 5396-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gram-negative bacteria use the type-V secretion pathway to expose proteins at their cell surface, many of which have virulence functions. Translocation of those proteins across the outer membrane occurs either by means of dedicated translocator proteins (two-partner secretion) or covalently fused translocator domains (autotransporters). Translocator proteins and translocator domains are beta-barrels requiring the beta-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) for membrane integration. However, the molecular details of their passage across the envelope and insertion into the outer membrane remain enigmatic, owing in part to the fact that in vitro systems are not available. Here we describe a versatile in vitro reconstitution system that faithfully reproduces both branches of the type-V secretion pathway and the assembly of beta-barrel outer membrane proteins. This system will allow an in-depth analysis of protein secretion across and integration into outer membranes.

1 - 8 of 8
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