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  • 1.
    Solberg, Ida Hove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    An ideological war: The politics of translation in occupied Norway (1940–1945)2019In: EST Congress 2019: Living Translation: Book of Abstracts, 2019, p. 208-208Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research has drawn attention to the roles of translators and translation during wartime in countries such as Belgium (Gouanvic 2001), Germany (Rundle & Sturge 2010) and France (Lombez 2013; 2016; 2017). This paper presents the first research on translation during the Nazi occupation of Norway (1940–1945).

    Findings from research in newly opened archives shows how the publication of translated literature came to be controlled during the occupation by regulations implemented by German officials in Norway. In 1941 the “department for culture and enlightenment”, a propaganda department established by Nazi officials, demanded that Norwegian publishing houses ask permission for each translated book they wanted to publish, a time-consuming and costly process. The archives reveal obvious instances of censorship, but they also show several instances of the authorities pushing books to translate. Some publishing houses highlight in their applications that they have been urged by the Reichskommissariat to publish certain works.

    By asking how the policies, processes and regulations of translation of literature were in this period, and how translators, publishers and Nazi officials interacted with each other in order to publish translated works, this paper gives insight into the politics of translation during Nazi occupation, as well as the ethical challenges of navigating regulations set by antidemocratic authorities – or, for some, profiting from them.

    The flow (or lack of such) of foreign literature in a country occupied by a foreign power does not only indicate the attitudes towards, and conditions for, translation under a given regime. It also yields insight into how this power could use censorship and withholding of translated literature on one hand, and pushing certain kinds of translated literature on the other, as means in the fight to win the ideological war, as Lombez (2016) has argued was the case in occupied France.

  • 2.
    Solberg, Ida Hove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    An ideological war: The politics of translation in occupied Norway (1940–45)2019In: Abstracts/Résumés/Abstracts: Plenary Presentations/Conférences plénières/Conferenze plenarie, 2019, p. 36-37Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research has drawn attention to the roles of translators and translation during wartime in countries such as Belgium (Gouanvic 2001), Germany (Rundle & Sturge 2010) and France (Lombez 2013; 2016; 2017). This paper presents the first research on translation during the Nazi occupation of Norway (1940–1945). Findings from research in newly opened archives shows how the publication of translated literature came to be controlled during the occupation by regulations implemented by German officials in Norway. In 1941 the “department for culture and enlightenment”, a propaganda department established by the Nazi officials, demanded that Norwegian publishing houses ask permission for each translated book they wanted to publish, a both time-consuming and costly process. The archives reveal obvious instances of censorship of literature in translation, but they also show several instances of the authorities pushing books, as some of the publishing houses highlight in their applications that they have been asked by the Reichskommissariat to publish certain translations. By asking how the policies, processes and regulations of translation of literature were in this period, and how translators, publishers and Nazi officials interacted with each other in order to publish translated works, this paper gives insight into the politics of translation during Nazi occupation, as well as the ethical challenges of navigating regulations set by antidemocratic authorities– or, for some, profiting from them. The flow (or lack of such) of foreign literature in a country occupied by aforeign power does not only indicate the attitudes towards, and conditions for, translation under a givenregime. It also yields insight into how this power could use censorship and withholding of translated literatureon one hand and to push certain kinds of translated literature on the other, as means in the fight to win theideological war, as Lombez (2016) has argued was the case in occupied France.

  • 3.
    Solberg, Ida Hove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Mitt minimalistiske bibliotek2019In: Bokvennen litterær avis (BLA), ISSN 2464-3971, no 8, p. 30-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Solberg, Ida Hove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    One is not born, but rather becomes, Simone de Beauvoir: Translation and reception of Beauvoir and Le deuxième sexe in Norway2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    By presenting the two Norwegian translations of Le deuxième sexe (1949), as well as an overview of how Simone de Beauvoir’s author image changed over time in interplay with the translations, this paper gives an account of the translational history of this seminal work in Norway. The intra-Scandinavian travels of the text, i.e. the international exchange which influenced particularly the first Scandinavian translations, are also addressed.

    The aim of the paper is to shed light on the various Norwegian ideas of ‘Beauvoir’ and her most famous work by answering the following questions: What characterizes the feminist classic Le deuxième sexe in its first translation into Norwegian in 1970? Why was the work (re)translated? In what ways does the (re)translation from 2000 differ from the first translation? How did the sociohistorical context, other publications by or about Beauvoir and textual features of the two translations affect the image of the author, and vice versa? 

    The first Norwegian translation of Le deuxième sexe, a severely abridged version, translated by the feminist activist Rønnaug Eliassen at the threshold of Norway’s second feminist wave is analyzed in contrast to the un-abridged (re)translation, translated by the highly professional translator of Beauvoir, Bente Christensen, complemented with a foreword by Beauvoir scholar Toril Moi. Upon the basis of the analysis of these versions of Le deuxième sexe in Norwegian, this paper explores how these translations may have both reflected and contributed to shaping how Beauvoir was depicted in the printed press across recent history (1940s–2010s). 

  • 5.
    Solberg, Ida Hove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Å avkolonisere akademia: Tonje Vold, Å lese verden. Fra imperieblikk og postkolonialisme til verdenslitteratur og økokritikk2019In: Bokvennen litterær avis (BLA), ISSN 2464-3971, no 11-12, p. 38-39Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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