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  • 1. Berglund, Tomas
    et al.
    Esser, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Matching Work Values With Job Qualities for Job Satisfaction: A Comparison of 24 OECD Countries in 20152019In: Work Orientations: Theoretical Perspectives and Empirical Findings / [ed] Bengt Furåker, Kristina Håkansson, New York: Routledge, 2019, p. 219-236Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Well-being in the workplace is central to sustainable work lives, warranting attention to how (preferred) job qualities matter for job satisfaction. The chapter starts with a description of how work values, job qualities and their matching in eight central dimensions of job quality vary across 24 OECD countries. A novel multidimensional approach to matching between work values and job qualities is proposed, grounded in theoretical expectations of how individuals may prefer several job qualities, to varying degrees. Then the independent importance of matching to job qualities for job satisfaction is assessed—that is, in addition to the direct effects of a wide range of job qualities on job satisfaction. Survey data from the International Social Survey Programme’s Work Orientation Module 2015 are used. Results show how vast majorities strongly value multiple, both extrinsic and intrinsic, value dimensions, but how jobs providing multiple job qualities are generally scarcer, although countries differ greatly in this respect. Importantly, matching to job qualities plays a substantial role for job satisfaction—that is, over and above the direct effects of job quality, where matching to intrinsic job qualities emerges as somewhat more important.

  • 2. Berglund, Tomas
    et al.
    Esser, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Modell i förändring: landrapport om Sverige2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [no]

    Denne rapporten skildrer den svenske velferdsstatens og det svenske arbeidsmarkedets utvikling fra 1990 og fram mot i dag. Perioden preges av store og avgjørende forandringer på en rekke områder. Lavere organisasjonsgrad og større sosiale forskjeller er to utviklingstrekk ved det svenske samfunnet.

    Rapportens ambisjon er å gi en bred beskrivelse av utviklingen basert på tidligere forskning.

  • 3.
    Bäckman, Olof
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Esser, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Korpi, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rojas, Yerko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Comparative Indicators on Job Quality and Social Protection2009In: Quality of Work in the European Union: Concept, Data and Debates from a Transnational Perspective / [ed] Ana M. Guillén, Svenn-Åge Dahl, Brussels: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Esser, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Continued Work or Retirement?: Preferred Exit-age in Western European countries2005Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of greying populations, decreasing fertility rates and a marked trend in falling retirement age is profoundly challenging the sharing of resources and supporting responsibilities between generations in the developed world. Previous studies on earlier exit-trends have focused mainly on supply-side incentives and generally conclude that people will exit given available retirement options. Substantial cross-national variations in exit-ages however remain unexplained. This suggests that also normative factors such as attitudes to work and retirement might be of importance. Through multi-level analyses, this study evaluates how welfare regime generosity, as well as production regime coordination explains cross-national patterns of retirement preferences across twelve Western European countries. Analysis firstly shows how both men and women on average prefer to retire at 58 years, meaning on average approximately 7 or 5.5 years before statutory retirement age in the case of men and women respectively. Contrary to what is expected from previous research on supply-side factors, preferences for relatively later retirement is found within more generous welfare regimes and also within more extensively coordinated production regimes. For women, however, institutional effects do not remain once substantial cross-national differences in women’s statutory retirement ages are taken into account.

  • 5.
    Esser, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Has Safety Made Us Lazy? Employment Commitment in Different Welfare States2009In: British Social Attitudes. The 25th Report, Sage Publications Ltd., London , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Esser, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ikke bare for pengene? Arbeidsmotivasjon, pensjonspreferanser og pliktfølelse i forskjellige velferdsstater2012In: Arbeidslinja: arbeidsmotivasjonen og velferdsstaten / [ed] Steinar Stjernø, Einar Øverbye, Universitetsforlaget, 2012, p. 52-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Esser, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lone Parents’ Self-rated Health in European Comparative Perspective: Socio-Economic Factors, Job Context and Social Protection2017In: Fertility, Health and Lone Parenting: European Contexts / [ed] Fabienne Portier-Le Cocq, Oxford: Routledge, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Esser, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Looking to the Nordics? The Swedish Social Investment Model in View of 20302015In: The Predistribution Agenda: tackling Inequality and Supporting Sustainable Growth / [ed] Claudia Chwalisz, Patrick Diamond, London: I.B. Tauris, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Esser, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Unemployment Insurance and Work Values in Twenty-Three Welfare StatesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Esser, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Welfare Regimes, Production Regimes and Employment Commitment: A Multi-level analysis of Twelve OECD countriesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Dubbla roller, dubbel stress? - familjepolitik, barn och stress i Sverige och andra välfärdsstater2007In: Halvvägs eller vilse? Om den nödvändiga balansen mellan föräldraskap och jobb, Premiss förlag, Stockholm , 2007, p. 19-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Bäckman, Olof
    Institutet för framtidsstudier.
    Korpi, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rojas, Yerko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Indicadores Comparativos Sobre Calidad En El Empleo Y Protection Social2009In: Calidad Del Trabajo En La Unión Europa. Concepto, Tensiones, Dimensiones / [ed] Guillén Rodríguez, A-M., Guitérrez Palacios, R., González Begega, S. (Eds.), Navarra: Thomson Civitas , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    A Framework for Comparing Social Protection in Developing and Developed Countries: The Example of Child Benefits2009In: International Social Security Review, ISSN 0020-871X, E-ISSN 1468-246X, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 91-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article outlines a conceptual and theoretical framework for improved comparative analysis of publicly provided social protection in developing countries, drawing on the research tradition of the study of longstanding welfare democracies. An important element of the proposed institutional approach is the establishment of comparable qualitative and quantitative indicators for social protection. The empirical example of child benefits indicates that differences between developed and developing countries should not be exaggerated, and that the prevalence of child benefits in sub-Saharan African and Latin American countries today resembles the inter-war period (1919-1938) situation in developed regions.

  • 14.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindh, Arvid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Job Preferences in Comparative Perspective 1989-2015: A Multi-Dimensional Evaluation of Individual and Contextual Influences2018In: International Journal of Sociology, ISSN 0020-7659, E-ISSN 1557-9336, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 142-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to provide a comparative assessment of work values across countries as well as over time. Differences and similarities in job preferences for eight central value dimensions are examined across nineteen countries between 1989 and 2015, made possible by four survey rounds from the International Social Survey, Work Orientation modules. Analyses of how extrinsic and intrinsic work values are related to individual and contextual factors are guided by contrasting theoretical approaches—modernization theory and a welfare-state institutional perspective. Four main results are reported. First, secure and interesting jobs are the most preferred job qualities, universally important to nearly all employees throughout all survey years. Second, values are markedly stable over time, but vary more across countries. Third, large majorities simultaneously value work autonomy, high income, advancement opportunities, jobs perceived as useful to society or helpful to others, indicating how individuals generally, are both intrinsically and extrinsically oriented toward work, with some gendered differences. Fourth partly in support of welfare-state institutional expectations, work values differ across countries mostly in relation to economic equality rather than economic development, so that both extrinsic and intrinsic work values are more important in more unequal societies.

  • 15.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Olsen, Karen M.
    Matched on job qualities? Single and coupled parents in European comparison2018In: The triple bind of single-parent families: Resources, employment and policies to improve well-being / [ed] Rense Nieuwenhuis, Laurie C. Maldonado, Bristol: Policy Press, 2018, p. 285-310Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Olsen, Karen M.
    Perceived Job Quality: Autonomy and Job Security within a Multi-Level Framework2012In: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 443-454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examine the relationship between institutions of labour market and welfare states and two central aspects of job quality: autonomy and job security. Drawing on theoretical frameworks from varieties of capitalism and a power resource approach, we examine whether macro-level features can explain country differences in perceived autonomy and job security. In multi-level analyses, we combine institutional data with data from the European Social Survey (ESS), which contains information on 13,414 employees from 19 countries. We report three main findings: first, we find high autonomy in the Nordic countries and low autonomy and job security in transition countries; second, the institutional features-union density and skill specificity-are positively associated with autonomy; third, unemployment rate is the most important factor in explaining country differences in perceived job security. Our findings suggest that the power of workers and their skill specificity are important in explaining cross-country differences in autonomy. The study shows that a multi-level approach may help explain how institutions shape employment outcomes.

  • 17.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Palme, Joakim
    Framtidsstudier.
    Do public pensions matter for health and well-being among retired persons?: Basic and income security pensions across 13 Western European countries2010In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 19, no Supplement s1, p. s121-s130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mortality rates suggest that elderly people in the advanced welfare democracies have experienced dramatically improved health over the past decades. This study examined the importance of public pensions for self-reported health and wellbeing among retired persons in 13 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development countries in 2002–2005. New public pension data make it possible to distinguish between two qualities of pension systems: ‘basic security’ for those who have no or a short work history, and ‘income security’ for those with a more extensive contribution record. For enhanced cross-national comparison, relative measures of ill-health and wellbeing were constructed to account for cultural bias in responses to survey questions and heterogeneity among countries in the general level of population health. Overall, better health is found in countries with more generous pensions, although the results are gendered; for women's health, high basic security of the pension system appears to be particularly important. Women's wellbeing also tends to be more dependent on the quality of basic security.

  • 18.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Palme, Joakim
    ESPN Thematic Report on retirement regimes for workers in arduous or hazardous jobs: Sweden 20162016Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Arbetsmarknadsmodeller2014In: Ekonomisk sociologi - en introduktion / [ed] Reza Azarian, Adel Daoud and Bengt Larsson, Stockholm: Liber, 2014, p. 150-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 19 of 19
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