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  • 1.
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Marsh, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Asplund, Lillemor
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry of methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs).2006In: J Mass Spectrom, ISSN 1076-5174, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 790-801Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Davies, R.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Hedebrant, U.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, I.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Rydberg, P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Törnqvist, M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Improved method to measure aldehyde adducts to N-terminal valine in hemoglobin using 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and 2,5-furandialdehyde as model compounds2009In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 47, no 8, p. 1950-1957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemoglobin (Hb) adducts are used to measure reactive compounds/metabolites in vivo. Schiff base adducts from aldehydes to N-termini in Hb have been measured by GC-MS/MS after stabilisation through reduction, and detachment by a modified Edman procedure. This paper describes a further development using 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and its probable metabolite, 2,5-furandialdehyde (FDA), as model compounds. Reference compounds were synthesized and characterized. The conditions for the reduction of the Schiff bases were optimized using NaBH(3)CN as a mild reducing agent, and steps used in the earlier method could be deleted. The adduct from FDA could not be specifically analysed, as selective reduction of the imine could not be achieved. In a few samples of human blood, background levels of 10-35 pmol/g globin of the HMF adduct were observed. Half-lifes of the reversible Schiff base adduct from HMF were determined to 3.4h at 37 degrees C and 10.9h at 25 degrees C. The developed method showed good sensitivity and reproducibility for the analysis of the Schiff base from HMF, with improvements regarding simplicity of work-up procedures due to mild conditions. The developed method could be explored for application to adducts from other aldehydes bound as Schiff bases to N-termini in Hb.

  • 3.
    Davies, Ronnie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Hedebrant, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Rydberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Improved method for the analysis of reactive aldehydes in human blood2008In: 6:e Svensk-norskt miljökemiskt möte: SNMM 2008 22-24 September, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Dosis, Ioannis
    et al.
    Kamarianos, Athanasios
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Karamanlis, Xanthippos
    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in marine sediment of Thermaikos Gulf, Greece2011In: International Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0306-7319, E-ISSN 1029-0397, Vol. 91, no 12, p. 1151-1165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) concentrations were determined in marine sediment samples collected from 7 different locations around Thermaikos Gulf in north Greece. PBDEs were detected in all sampling sites and their average total concentration (Sigma PBDEs) ranged from 0.26 to 4.92 ng g(-1) d.w. Concentrations were an order of magnitude higher in locations outlining the inner part of the Gulf, which were also closer to industrial areas, sewage treatment plant discharges, the city's harbour and landfill area. These findings suggest pollution in the aquatic ecosystem from industrial and urban activities in the area. Congener profiles exhibit predominance of BDE-209, while concentrations of other PBDE congeners were usually lower, when compared to similar studies from other countries globally, indicating that Thermaikos Gulf is among the low-polluted areas. Statistical analysis showed significant differences among the higher polluted sampling stations. Statistically significant differences also existed between sampling stations with high and low PBDE concentrations. Correlations between congeners suggested local contamination sources; however, specific point sources of pollution were not established.

  • 5.
    Fred, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Kautiainen, Antti
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Hemoglobin adduct levels in rat and mouse treated with 1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane2004In: Chemical Research in Toxicology, ISSN 0893-228X, E-ISSN 1520-5010, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 785-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For cancer risk assessment of 1,3-butadiene from rodent cancer test data, the in vivo doses of formed 1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB) should be known. In vivo doses of DEB were measured through a specific reaction product with hemoglobin (Hb), a ring-closed adduct, N,N-(2,3-dihydroxy-1,4-butadiyl)valine (Pyr-Val), to N-terminal valines. An analytical method based on tryptic digestion of Hb and quantification of Pyr-modified heptapeptides by LC-MS/MS has been further developed and applied in vivo to DEB-treated rats. Furthermore, N-(2,3,4-trihydroxybutyl)valine adducts (THB-Val) to the N-terminal valine in Hb were measured in rats and mice treated with DEB and in a complementary experiment with 1,2-epoxy-3,4-butanediol (EBdiol), using a modified Edman degradation method and GC-MS/MS. In vitro reactions of hemolysate with DEB and EBdiol were used to measure reaction rates for adduct formation needed for calculation of doses and rates elimination in vivo. The results showed that the level of the Pyr-Val adduct per administered dose of DEB was approximately the same in rats as had earlier been observed in mice [Kautiainen et al. (2000) Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 14, 1848−1853]. Levels of the THB-Val adduct after DEB treatment were 3−4 times higher in rat than in mouse, probably reflecting an enhanced hydrolysis of DEB to EBdiol catalyzed by epoxide hydrolase. After EBdiol treatment, the THB-Val adduct levels were about the same in rat and mouse. Calculations from in vitro data show that the Pyr-Val adduct is a relevant monitor for the in vivo dose of DEB and that THB-Val primarily reflects doses to EBdiol. The calculated rates of formation of adducts and rates of elimination agree with expectations. Procedures for quantification of Hb adducts as modified peptides as well as preparation and characterization of peptide standards have been evaluated.

  • 6.
    Fängström, Britta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Bignert, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Grandjean, Philippe
    Weihe, P
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and traditional organochlorine pollutants in fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) from the Faroe Islands2005In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 60, no 7, p. 836-843Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The observed high-level burdens of organohalogens among the residents of the Faroe Islands, needs to be explained. Long-finned pilot whale (Globicephala melas) blubber and meat are known sources of environmental exposure. The present study focus on the organohalogen contamination of the fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis). The compounds quantified in fulmar muscle, fat, and egg are PCBs, DDTs, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The dominating pollutants are the 4,4′-DDT metabolite 4,4′-DDE and the two PCB congeners, CB-153 and CB-180, which are present in geometric mean concentrations of 7100, 4700 and 2500 ng/g lipid weight (l.w.), respectively, in adult fulmar muscle. 4,4′-DDT and HCB concentrations are approximately 250 ng/g l.w., each. Concentrations in the eggs are about 50% of the fulmar muscle levels, due to differences in lipid amounts, 4% in muscle and 10% in the eggs, the exposure contribution on a fresh weight basis is almost the same. As a result, both the egg and the adult fulmar muscle may lead to a significant exposure risk, if consumed by humans.

    BDE-153, the most abundant PBDE congener in fulmar muscle, with a geometric mean concentration of 6.5 ng/g l.w., is much lower than the individual PCB congeners and 4,4′-DDE concentrations. In the adult fulmar muscle, the relative PBDE congener pattern is different from that previously observed in biota, with BDE-153 and BDE-154 as the dominating congeners, rather than BDE-47. In contrast, BDE-47 is the most abundant congener in juvenile muscle and subcutaneous fat. The ∑PBDE concentrations are almost the same in egg, muscle (adult and juvenile) and subcutaneous fat (juvenile). For the polybrominated biphenyl (BB-153) the concentrations are considerably higher in the adult bird and egg than in the juvenile bird; this is also seen for the PCB and 4,4′-DDE concentrations.

    PCB concentrations found in fulmar egg and muscle are in the same range as seen in the pilot whale, i.e. 590–5700 ng/g l.w. for CB-153. Hence humans are also exposed to PCBs at a reasonable degree via intake of fulmar and/or fulmar egg and not only via pilot whale blubber.

  • 7.
    Fängström, Britta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Weihe, Pál
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hydroxylated PCB Metabolites in Non-hatched Fulmar Eggs from the Faroe Islands2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 3, no 34, p. 184-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty-six polychlorinated biphenylols (OH-PCBs) conge-ners were characterized in Fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis) eggs collected from the Faroe Islands. The seven most abundant congeners were quantified in 19 samples, and the XOH-PCB concentrations ranged between 0.92 and 4.0 ng g 1 fresh weight (f.w.). These eggs constitute a part of the traditional diet for at least a part of the population on the Faroe Islands and may contribute to the high levels of these contaminants found in the blood of pregnant Faroese women. Because the metabolites are present in the nonhatched fulmar egg, it is concluded that the OH-PCBs are transferred to the egg before laying. High levels, 3300- 18 000 ng g-1 l.w., of 2polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) were determined in the fulmar eggs, which are a consider-able source for human exposure. The high PCB levels are a source for metabolic formation of hydroxylated PCBs.

  • 8.
    Fängström, Britta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Odsjö, Tjelvar
    Department of Contaminant Research, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Norén, Koidu
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Temporal trends of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hexabromocyclododecane in milk from Stockholm mothers, 1980-2004.2008In: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, ISSN 1613-4125, E-ISSN 1613-4133, Vol. 52, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental and human exposures to brominated flame retardants (BFR) have been of emerging concern since some BFR are persistent and bioaccumulative compounds. Among those, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) have frequently been reported in low to high ng/g concentrations in human blood around the world while hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) only occasionally has been reported and then in the low ppb concentrations in human blood. The present study concerns PBDE congener and HBCDD concentrations in human milk from Stockholm from 1980 to 2004. HBCDD concentrations has increased four to five times since 1980 until 2002 but seems to have stabilized at this concentration in the last years (2003/04). Similarly, BDE-153 has continued to increase at least to 2001, after which it has stabilized in the mother's milk. Other PBDE congeners with four to five bromine substituents peaked 5 years earlier (1995) and are all decreasing. DecaBDE (BDE-209) is not a suitable biomarker for time trend studies according to the present results, showing no changes over time. This is likely due to its short apparent half-life in humans and poor transfer from blood to milk.

  • 9.
    Hovander, Lotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Linderholm, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Bignert, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Fängström, Britta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Kocan, Anton
    Petrik, Jan
    Trnovec, Tomas
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Levels of PCBs and their metabolites in the serum of residents of a highly contaminated area in eastern Slovakia2006In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 40, no 12, p. 3696-3703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The over-riding aim of the present investigation was to obtain information concerning exposure that can be used as a basis for studies on the health of individuals residing in the Michalovce area of eastern Slovakia which is heavily contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Accordingly, this work focused on determination of serum concentrations of hydroxylated (OH-PCBs) and methylsulfonyl-substituted (MeSO2-PCBs) metabolites of PCBs. One hundred and twenty-two men and women, 20-59 years of age, living in the contaminated area and 175 from the control Stropkov/Svidnik district were selected randomly from 2047 sampled individuals. Following a specially designed cleanup, the levels of various congeners of OH-PCBs and MeSO2-PCBs in their serum were quantitated by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, with comparison to authentic reference standards. The median concentrations of PCB congeners and their OH-PCB and MeSO2-PCB metabolites were 2-3-fold higher in residents of Michalovce than in the control region. The levels of certain OH-PCB metabolites were in the same high range as those of individual PCB congeners, whereas the MeSO2-PCB levels were significantly lower. The PCB and their metabolites were present at slightly higher concentrations in men than in women, and the serum levels of PCBs and MeSO2-PCBs increased with increasing age. Thus, the environmental contamination resulting from previous industrial production of PCBs has led to elevated concentrations of PCBs and their metabolites in the serum of individuals living in the Michalovce area.

  • 10. Lunder, Sonya
    et al.
    Hovander, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Significantly Higher Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Levels in Young US Children than in Their Mothers2010In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 44, no 13, p. 5256-5262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While young children are rarely included in biomonitoring studies, they are presumed to be at greater risk of ingesting environmental contaminants particularly those that accumulate in foods or shed from consumer products. The widely used fire retardants polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous contaminants in the indoor environment and are widely detected at higher levels in Americans than in individuals from other countries. However, there are only three studies of PBDEs in U.S. children. We hypothesized that PBDEs are present in higher concentrations in young children than their mothers. PBDEs were assessed in blood samples collected concurrently from 20 mothers and their children, ages 1.5 to 4 years. The chemical analyses were performed by GC/MS applying selected ion monitoring. The samples were analyzed for 20 PBDE congeners; 11 were detected. Sigma PBDEs for children were typically 2.8 times higher than for mothers, with median child:mother ratios varying from 2 to 4 for individual congeners. In 19 of 20 families studied, children had higher Sigma PBDE concentrations than their mothers with significant (p < 0.01) concentration differences for five of the PBDE congeners. Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) was quantitated in 13 children and 9 mothers. Other studies indicate PBDEs are not elevated at birth, suggesting that early life is an intense period of PBDE intake. Children's increased hand-to-mouth activity, dietary preferences, and exposures from breast milk may result in greater ingestion of PBDEs than adults. These findings suggest that measurements from adults likely do not reflect exposures to young children despite sharing homes and similar diets.

  • 11.
    Löfstrand, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Asplund, Lillemor
    High concentrations of 6-hydroxylated - 2,2´,4,4´-tetrabromodiphenyl ether in herring (Clupea harengus) plasma from the Baltic Sea2008In: Svensk Norsk miljömöte 2008: SNMM 2008, 2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Norrgran Engdahl, Jessica
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bignert, A.
    Jones, B.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Swedish Toxicology Sciences Research Centre (Swetox), Sweden.
    Weiss, Jana M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Cats' Internal Exposure to Selected Brominated Flame Retardants and Organochlorines Correlated to House Dust and Cat Food2017In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 3012-3020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pet cats may be used as a biomarker for assessing exposures to organohalogen compounds (OHCs) adsorbed to household dust in home environments. This study explores two exposure routes of OHCs, ingestion of OHCs (i) via house dust and (ii) via cat food. House dust from 17 Swedish homes and serum from the participating families' pet cats were collected, and cat food was purchased matching the diet reported. Paired samples of cat serum, house dust, and cat food were analyzed for brominated flame retardants/natural products (polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), decabromobiphenyl (BB-209), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), 2,4,6-tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP), OH-PBDEs) and organochlorines (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 1,1-bis(4,4'-dichlorodipheny1)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (4,4'-DDT), 1,1-bis(4,4'-dichlorodiphenyl)-2,2-dichloroethene (4,4'-DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), pentachlorophenol (PCP)). Significant correlations were found between serum and dust samples from the living rooms for BDE-47 (p < 0.035), BDE-99 (p < 0.035), and BDE-153 (p < 0.039), from the adult's bedroom for BDE-99 < 0.019) and from all rooms for BDE-99 (p < 0.020) and BB-209 (p < 0.048). This is the first time a correlation between cat serum levels and household dust has been established, a finding that supports the hypothesis that dust is a significant exposure route for cats. Serum levels were also significantly correlated with concentrations found in cat food for 6-OH-BDE47 (p < 0.002), 2,4,6-TBP (p < 0.035), and BB-209 (p < 0.007). DBDPE was found in high concentrations in all dust (median 154 pmol/g) and food samples (median 0.7 pmol/ig lw) but was below detection in serum samples, suggesting low or no bioavailability for DBDPE in cats.

  • 13.
    Norrgran Engdahl, Jessica
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Jones, Bernt
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bignert, Anders
    Weiss, Jana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Cats’ internal exposure to selected BFRs and organochlorines correlated to house dust and cat foodManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Norrgran, Jessica
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Jones, Bernt
    Bignert, Anders
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Swedish Toxicology Sciences Research Center (Swetox), Sweden.
    Higher PBDE Serum Concentrations May Be Associated with Feline Hyperthyroidism in Swedish Cats2015In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 5107-5114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Serum from 82 individual cats was analyzed for decabromobiphenyl (BB-209), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hydroxylated PBDEs (OH-PBDEs), and 2,4,6-TBP in order to study differences in body burden between healthy and sick cats diagnosed with Feline Hyperthyroidism (FH). Within the study group, 60 of these cats had a euthyroid (n = 23) or hyperthyroid (n = 37) status, all of which were used in the comparison. This study shows that hyperthyroid compared to euthyroid cats have higher serum concentrations for some of the investigated PBDEs (BDE-99, BDE-153, and BDE-183) and CB-153 on a fat weight basis. Further, it is intriguing, and beyond explanation, why the flame retardant BB-209 (discontinued in 2000) is present in all of the cat serum samples in concentrations similar to BDE-209. Median BDE-47/-99 ratios are 0.47 and 0.32 for healthy and euthyroid cats, respectively, which differs significantly from Swedes, where the ratio is 3.5. Another important finding is the occurrence of very low levels or the absence of hydroxylated PBDE metabolites in the cats. In addition, the major OH-PBDE, 6-OH-BDE47, is likely of natural origin, probably ingested via cat food. The statistics indicate an association between elevated PBDE concentrations in the cats and FH.

  • 15. Qiu, Yanling
    et al.
    Strid, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Bignert, Anders
    Zhu, Zhiliang
    Zhao, Jianfu
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Loannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Chlorinated and brominated organic contaminants in fish from Shanghai markets: A case study of human exposure2012In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 458-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study were two favorite edible fish species for local residents, i.e., mandarin fish and crawfish, collected from the Shanghai market and analyzed for selected organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs). Efforts were also made to identify the potential sources of these contaminants. Comparable concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) and HBCDD were found in muscle tissue of mandarin fish from Guangdong (GDF), the Pearl River Delta and from Taihu Lake (TLF), the Yangtze River Delta. Levels of chlordanes, PCBs and PBDEs were about one magnitude lower in TLF compared to GDF. The concentrations of OCPs in the butter-like gland of the crawfish (CFB) were 2-5 times of those in the crawfish muscle (CFM) while concentrations of PCBs, PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs were comparable. The different patterns and levels of chlorinated and brominated organo-halogen contaminants seen in mandarin fish from GDF and TLF indicates that different types of chemicals might be used in the two delta regions. The present study also shows a good correlation between the concentrations of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and pentachloroanisol (PCA) in fish for the first time. Fish consumption limits based on chemical contaminants with non-carcinogenic effects were calculated. The estimated maximum daily consumption limit for GDF,TLF, CFM and CFB were 1.5, 2.6, 3.7 and 0.08 kg, respectively, indicating no significant risk regarding the persistent organic pollutants measured in the present study.

  • 16.
    Rydén, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Strid, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Occurrence and potential human exposure to brominated flame retardants at a Swedish smelter handling electronic scrapManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Some well-known brominated flame retardants are common in electronic and electric devices, i.e. polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), nowadays particularly the commercial DecaBDE, and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), but others are used as well. The PBDEs are ubiquitous environmental contaminants while the TBBPA is primarily reported as a contaminant of the abiotic compartments. In this study, personnel at a smelter handling large quantities of shredded printed circuit boards were assessed for potential elevated concentrations of PBDEs, TBBPA and other BFRs. Also dust, sampled at a few sites around the plant, was analysed for BFRs. The dominating BFRs in the dust were decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) and TBBPA, while intermediate levels were indicated for bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and hexabromobenzene (HBB) and only low concentrations of decabromobiphenyl (BB-209) and 2,4,6-tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP). The workers all showed similar concentrations of the PBDE congeners in serum as recently determined for a Swedish control group. TBBPA was below limit of detection while 2,3,4,6-tetrabromophenol was present in all workers at rather high concentrations. It is yet not known from where this exposure originate, since the compound is not related to BFRs in the dust from the electronic scrap. It is clear that the workers are well protected from the emissions from the printed circuit boards, even though the volumes of electronic scrap handled at the smelter has increased significantly.

  • 17. Smedje, Greta
    et al.
    Lindgren, Torsten
    Jakobsson, Kristina
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Flame Retardants in Airplanes2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Svavarsson, Jörundur
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Brominated organic compounds in a high trophic Arctic fish species, Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus)2008In: 6:e Svensk-norskt miljökemiskt möte: SNMM 2008 22-24 September, 2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Svavarsson, Jörundur
    Bergman, Åke
    Brominated organic compounds in a high trophic arctic fish species, Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus)2008In: Organohalogen Compounds: pops in marine mammals: Levels, effects, trends, 2008, p. 817-820Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Svavarsson, Jörundur
    University of Iceland, Institute of Biology.
    Päpke, Olaf
    Eurofins GfA, Hamburg.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Neutral and phenolic brominated organic compounds of natural and anthropogenic origin in Northeast Atlantic Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus)2010In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 29, no 12, p. 2653-2659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, muscle and liver tissue from 10 female Greenland sharks (Somniosus microcephalus) collected in Icelandic waters were analyzed for neutral and phenolic brominated organic compounds, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and the structurally related methoxylated (MeO) and hydroxylated (OH) PBDEs. Hydroxylated PBDEs exist both as natural products and as metabolites of the anthropogenic PBDEs, whereas MeO-PBDEs appear to exclusively be of natural origin. Other compounds examined were 2′,6-dimethoxy-2,3′,4,5′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (2′,6-diMeO-BDE68), 2,2′-dimethoxy-3,3′,5,5′-tetrabromobiphenyl (2,2′-diMeO-BB80), 2,4,6-tribromoanisol (2,4,6-TBA) and 2,4,6-tribromophenol, all of natural origin, although 2,4,6-TBA and its phenolic counterpart may also be of anthropogenic origin. The major brominated organic compound was 6-MeO-BDE47, and ΣMeO-PBDE ranged from 49 to 210 ng/g fat in muscle and from 55 to 200 ng/g fat in liver tissue. Total concentrations of PBDEs were lower than ΣMeO-PBDE, in all but one sample, ranging between 7.3 to 190 and 9.9 to 200 ng/g fat in muscle and liver, respectively, and major congeners were BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-100. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers were analyzed using both high- and low-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) as a quality assurance, and the results from this comparison were acceptable. In accordance with previous work on Greenland sharks, no size/age-related accumulation was observed. Differences seen in concentrations were instead assumed to be a reflection of different feeding habits among the individuals. Phenolic compounds were only formed/retained in trace amounts in the Greenland shark. Among the phenolic compounds studied were 6-OH-BDE47, 2′-OH-BDE68, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol, all detected in liver and the latter two in muscle

  • 21.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Smedje, Greta
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Lindgren, Torsten
    Lundgren, Håkan
    Jakobsson, Kristina
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Brominated flame retardant exposure of aircraft personnel2014In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 116, p. 83-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aircraft is the result of high fire safety demands. Personnel working in or with aircraft might therefore be exposed to several BFRs. Previous studies have reported PBDE exposure in flight attendants and in passengers. One other group that may be subjected to significant BFR exposure via inhalation, are the aircraft maintenance workers. Personnel exposure both during flights and maintenance of aircraft, are investigated in the present study. Several BFRs were present in air and dust sampled during both the exposure scenarios; PBDEs, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane. PBDEs were also analyzed in serum from pilots/cabin crew, maintenance workers and from a control group of individuals without any occupational aircraft exposure. Significantly higher concentrations of PBDEs were found in maintenance workers compared to pilots/cabin crew and control subjects with median total PBDE concentrations of 19, 6.8 and 6.6 pmol g(-1) lipids, respectively. Pilots and cabin crew had similar concentrations of most PBDEs as the control group, except for BDE-153 and BDE-154 which were significantly higher. Results indicate higher concentrations among some of the pilots compared to the cabin crew. It is however, evident that the cabin personnel have lower BFR exposures compared to maintenance workers that are exposed to such a degree that their blood levels are significantly different from the control group.

  • 22.
    Svengren, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hu, Shichao
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    An Oxofluoride Catalyst Comprised of Transition Metals and a Metalloid for Application in Water Oxidation2015In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 21, no 37, p. 12991-12995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of the recently discovered oxofluoride solid solution (CoxNi1-x)(3)Sb4O6F6 as a catalyst for water oxidation is demonstrated. The phase exhibits a cubic arrangement of the active metal that forms oxo bridges to the metalloid with possible catalytic participation. The Co3Sb4O6F6 compound proved to be capable of catalyzing 2H(2)OO(2)+4H(+)+4e(-) at 0.33V electrochemical and 0.39V chemical overpotential with a TOF of 4.410(-3), whereas Ni3Sb4O6F6 needs a higher overpotential. Relatively large crystal cubes (0.3-0.5mm) are easily synthesized and readily handled as they demonstrate both chemical resistance to wear after repeated insitu tests under experimental conditions, and have a mechanical hardness of 270V0.1 using Vickers indentation. The combined properties of this compound offer a potential technical advantage for incorporation to a catalytic interface in future sustainable fuel production.

  • 23.
    Svengren, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Torapava, N.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ali, S. Imran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Johnsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    A transition metal oxofluoride offering advantages in electrocatalysis and potential use in applications2016In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 188, p. 481-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recently described solid solution ( Co,Ni,Mn)(3)Sb4O6F6 has proved stable and efficient as a catalyst for electrocatalytic water oxidation. The end component Co3Sb4O6F6 was found to be most efficient, maintaining a current density of j = 10 mA cm(-2) at an overpotential of 443 mV with good capability. At this current density, O-2 and H-2 were produced in the ratio 1 : 2 without loss of faradaic current against a Pt-cathode. A morphological change in the crystallite surface was observed after 0.5 h, however, even after 64.5 h, the overall shape and size of the small crystallites were unaffected and the electrolyte contained only 0.02 at% Co. It was also possible to conclude from in situ EXAFS measurements that the coordination around Co did not change. The oxofluorides express both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface sites, incorporate a flexible metalloid element and offer the possibility of a mechanism that differs from other inorganic catalytic pathways previously described.

  • 24.
    Vikström, A.C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, L.
    Athanassiadis, I.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Granath, F.
    Törnqvist, M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    In vivo doses of acrylamide and glycidamide in humans after intake of acrylalmide-rich food2011In: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 119, no 1, p. 41-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Vikström, Anna C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    Naruszewicz, Marek
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Granath, Fredrik N.
    Törnqvist, Margareta A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    In Vivo Doses of Acrylamide and Glycidamide in Humans after Intake of Acrylamide-Rich Food2011In: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 119, no 1, p. 41-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For assessment of cancer risk from acrylamide (AA) exposure through food, the relation between intake from food in humans and the in vivo doses (area under the concentration-time curve, AUC) of AA (AUC-AA) and of its genotoxic metabolite glycidamide (GA) (AUC-GA) is used as a basis for extrapolation between exposure levels and between species. In this study, AA-rich foods were given to nonsmokers: a high intake of 11 mu g AA/kg body weight (bw) and day for 4 days or an extra (medium) intake of 2.5 mu g AA/kg bw and day for a month. Hemoglobin (Hb)-adduct levels from AA and GA, measured in blood samples donated before and after exposures, were used for calculation of AUC-AA and AUC-GA using reaction rate constants for the adduct formation measured in vitro. Both AA- and GA-adduct levels increased about twofold after the periods with enhanced intake. AUC for the high and medium groups, respectively, in nanomolar hours per microgram AA per kilogram bw, was for AA 212 and 120 and for GA 49 and 21. The AA intake in the high group was better controlled and used for comparisons with other data. The AUCs per exposure dose obtained in the present human study (high group) are in agreement with those previously obtained at 10(2) times higher exposure levels in humans. Furthermore, the values of AUC-AA and AUC-GA are five and two times higher, respectively, than the corresponding values for F344 rats exposed to AA at levels as in published cancer bioassays.

  • 26.
    Vikström, Anna C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Sune
    Paulsson, Birgit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Internal doses of acrylamide and glycidamide in mice fed diets with low acrylamide contents2008In: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, ISSN 1613-4125, E-ISSN 1613-4133, Vol. 52, no 8, p. 974-980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of acrylamide during heating of certain foodstuffs constitutes a potential health hazard. The health risk assessment should be based on knowledge about the relation between dietary exposure to acrylamide and internal doses of acrylamide and its genotoxic metabolite glycidamide. The primary aim of this study in mice was to measure these relationships at low levels of acrylamide intake through the diet. A secondary aim was to clarify which extraction method should be used when analyzing acrylamide in food in order to obtain a correct measure of the acrylamide that is available for absorption. In the analysis procedure, alkaline extraction has earlier shown much higher measured acrylamide levels in certain foods compared to water extraction. In this subcronic study the administered diets were composed to give five levels of acrylamide intakes between 3 and 50 mug/kg body weight per day (calculated on figures obtained after water extraction). Internal doses of acrylamide and glycidamide were measured through hemoglobin (Hb)-adducts. The results showed linear relationships between the exposure of acrylamide and Hb-adduct levels from both acrylamide and glycidamide at these low exposure levels. The study also showed that the &quot;extra&quot; acrylamide measured with alkaline extraction does not correspond to bioavailable acrylamide.

  • 27.
    Vikström, Anna C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Wilson, Kathryn M.
    Paulsson, Birgit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Mucci, Lorelei A.
    Bälter, Katarina
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Alcohol influence on acrylamide to glycidamide metabolism assessed with hemoglobin-adducts and questionnaire data2010In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 820-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our purpose was to investigate whether alcohol (ethanol) consumption could have an influence on the metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide in humans exposed to acrylamide through food. We studied a subsample from a population-based case–control study of prostate cancer in Sweden (CAPS). Questionnaire data for alcohol intake estimates was compared to the ratio of hemoglobin-adduct levels for acrylamide and glycidamide, used as a measure of individual differences in metabolism. Data from 161 non-smoking men were processed with regard to the influence of alcohol on the metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide. A negative, linear trend of glycidamide-adduct to acrylamide-adduct-level ratios with increasing alcohol intake was observed and the strongest association (p-value for trend = 0.02) was obtained in the group of men with the lowest adduct levels (⩽47 pmol/g globin) when alcohol intake was stratified by acrylamide-adduct levels. The observed trend is likely due to a competitive effect between ethanol and acrylamide as both are substrates for cytochrome P450 2E1. Our results, strongly indicating that ethanol influence metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide, partly explain earlier observations of only low to moderate associations between questionnaire data on dietary acrylamide intake and hemoglobin-adduct levels.

  • 28.
    Yin, Ge
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Swedish Toxicology Sciences Research Center, Sweden; Tongji University, China.
    Zhou, Yihui
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Tongji University, China.
    Qiu, Yanling
    Asplund, Lillemor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    A refined method for analysis of 4,4 '-dicofol and 4,4 '-dichlorobenzophenone2017In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 24, no 15, p. 13307-13314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acaricide, dicofol, is a well-known pesticide and partly a substitute for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). Only few reports on environmental occurrence and concentrations have been reported calling for improvements. Hence, an analytical method was further developed for dicofol and dichlorobenzophenone (DCBP) to enable assessments of their environmental occurrence. Concentrated sulfuric acid was used to remove lipids and to separate dicofol from DCBP. On-column injection was used as an alternative to splitless injection to protect dicofol from thermal decomposition. By the method presented herein, it is possible to quantify dicofol and DCBP in the same samples. Arctic cod (Gadus morhua) were spiked at two dose levels and the recoveries were determined. The mean recovery for dicofol was 65% at the low dose (1 ng) and 77% at the high dose (10 ng). The mean recovery for DCBP was 99% at the low dose (9.2 ng) and 146% at the high dose (46 ng). The method may be further improved by use of another lipid removal method, e.g., gel permeation chromatography. The method implies a step forward in dicofol environmental assessments.

  • 29.
    Yin, Ge
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Zhou, Yihui
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Qiu, Yanling
    Asplund, Lillemor
    A refined method for analysis of 4,4’-dicofol and 4,4’-dichlorobenzophenoneManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Yin, Ge
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Zhou, Yihui
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Tongji University, China.
    Strid, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Zheng, Ziye
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Bignert, Anders
    Ma, Taowu
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Qiu, Yanling
    Spatial distribution and bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in snails (Bellamya aeruginosa) and sediments from Taihu Lake area, China2017In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 7740-7751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taihu Lake area is one of the densest metropolitan areas in the world including diverse industrial activity. In the present study, the snail (Bellamya aeruginosa) and sediment were collected from the Taihu Lake area to investigate the contamination status, congener pattern, spatial distribution, and bioaccumulation effect of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The samples underwent liquid extraction, lipid removal by sulfuric acid, and acidic silica gel column, and subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Concentration of S22PCBs ranged between 90 and 680 ng g(-1) lipid weight in the snails and between 0.018 and 0.82 ng g(-1) dry weight in the sediments. Concentration of S24PBDEs varied from 25 to 200 ng g(-1) lipid weight in the snails and from 0.62 to 67 ng g(-1) dry weight in the sediments. The levels of PCBs and PBDEs observed were in the medium to low range compared with other studies in the world. CB-153 was the predominant PCB congener in both snails and sediments whereas BDE-209 showed a low bioavailability in the snails, even if it contributed up to 70% of S24PBDEs in the sediments. The spatial distribution showed that the highest concentration of PCBs and PBDEs were detected in samples from Zhushan Lake. East Taihu Lake and Dianshan Lake showed lower concentration of PCBs and PBDEs than the other sampling sites. Biota-sediment accumulation was found between snails and sediments of most of PCB and PBDE congeners except for the highly brominated BDEs (i.e., BDE-209). Therefore, sediment is suggested to be an appropriate matrix to monitor BDE-209 while aquatic species such as the snail could be good for monitoring of PCBs and lower brominated BDE congeners. No significant correlation (Spearman correlation test, two-tailed) of CB-153 (r = 0.54, p = 0.27) or BDE-47 (r = 0.60, p = 0.21) was found between snails and sediments.

  • 31.
    Zhou, Yihui
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Tongji University, China.
    Asplund, Lillemor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Yin, Ge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Wideqvist, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bignert, Anders
    Qiu, Yanling
    Zhu, Zhiliang
    Zhao, Jianfu
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Swedish Toxicology Sciences Research Center (Swetox), Sweden; Tongji University, China.
    Extensive organohalogen contamination in wildlife from a site in the Yangtze River Delta2016In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 554, p. 320-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental and human health concerns for organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) extend beyond the 23 persistent organic pollutants (POPs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention. The current, intense industrial production and use of chemicals in China and their bioaccumulation makes Chinese wildlife highly suitable for the assessment of legacy, novel and emerging environmental pollutants. In the present study, six species of amphibians, fish and birds were sampled from paddy fields in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) were screened for OHCs. Some extensive contamination was found, both regarding number and concentrations of the analytes, among the species assessed. High concentrations of chlorinated paraffins were found in the snake, Short-tailed mamushi (range of 200-340 mu g g(-1) lw), Peregrine falcon (8-59 mu g g(-1) lw) and Asiatic toad (97 mu g g(-1) lw). Novel contaminants and patterns were observed; octaCBs to decaCB made up 20% of the total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) content in the samples and new OHCs, substituted with 5-8 chlorines, were found but are not yet structurally confirmed. In addition, Dechlorane 602 (DDC-DBF) and numerous other OHCs (DDTs, hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexbromocyclododecane (HBCDD), chlordane, heptachlor, endosulfan and Mirex) were found in all species analyzed. These data show extensive chemical contamination of wildlife in the YRD with a suite of OHCs with both known and unknown toxicities, calling for further indepth studies.

1 - 31 of 31
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