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  • 1.
    Demina, Irina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Differentiation of infected cells in root nodule symbioses2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Demina, Irina V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    The actinorhizal symbiosis of Datisca glomerata: Search for nodule-specific marker genes2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The actinorhizal symbiosis is entered by nitrogen-fixing actinobacteria of the genus Frankia and a large group of woody plant species distributed among eight dicot families. The actinorhizal symbiosis, as well as the legume-rhizobia symbiosis, involves the stable intracellular accommodation of the microsymbionts in special organs called root nodules. Within the nodules, the nitrogen-fixing bacteria are provided with carbon sources by the host plant while supplying the plant with fixed nitrogen, which is often a limiting factor in plant growth and development.

    Datisca glomerata (C. Presl.) Baill. (Datiscaceae, Cucurbitales) is a suffruticose plant with a relatively short generation time of six months, and therefore represents the actinorhizal species most suited as a genetic model system. In order to obtain an overview of nodule development and metabolism, the nodule transcriptome was analyzed. Comparison of nodule vs. root transcriptomes allowed identification of potential marker genes for nodule development. The activity of the promoters of two of these genes was studied in planta. Furthermore, auxins and cytokinins were quantified in roots and nodules, and the auxin responses in roots were compared in D. glomerata and the model legume Medicago truncatula.

    Our results indicate that in actinorhizal plants signaling in the root epidermis leading to nodule organogenesis follows the common symbiosis pathway described for the legume-rhizobia symbiosis and arbuscular mycorrhiza. Moreover, we discovered a group of nodule-specific genes encoding defensin-like peptides with an unusual C-terminal domain that had not been found in other plant species. A possible role in the symbiosis-specific differentiation of the microsymbiont and in nodule development was suggested for these cysteine-rich peptides. Finally, we showed that D. glomerata and M. truncatula differ in their auxin and cytokinin requirements for the development of both nodules and lateral roots.

  • 3.
    Demina, Irina V.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Maity, Pooja Jha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Nagchowdhury, Anurupa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Ng, Jason L. P.
    van der Graaff, Eric
    Demchenko, Kirill N.
    Roitsch, Thomas
    Mathesius, Ulrike
    Pawlowski, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Accumulation of and Response to Auxins in Roots and Nodules of the Actinorhizal Plant Datisca glomerata Compared to the Model Legume Medicago truncatula2019In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 10, article id 1085Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Actinorhizal nodules are structurally different from legume nodules and show a greater similarity to lateral roots. Because of the important role of auxins in lateral root and nodule formation, auxin profiles were examined in roots and nodules of the actinorhizal species Datisca glomerata and the model legume Medicago truncatula. The auxin response in roots and nodules of both species was analyzed in transgenic root systems expressing a beta-glucuronidase gene under control of the synthetic auxin-responsive promoter DR5. The effects of two different auxin on root development were compared for both species. The auxin present in nodules at the highest levels was phenylacetic acid (PAA). No differences were found between the concentrations of active auxins of roots vs. nodules, while levels of the auxin conjugate indole-3-acetic acid-alanine were increased in nodules compared to roots of both species. Because auxins typically act in concert with cytokinins, cytokinins were also quantified. Concentrations of cis-zeatin and some glycosylated cytokinins were dramatically increased in nodules compared to roots of D. glomerata, but not of M. truncatula. The ratio of active auxins to cytokinins remained similar in nodules compared to roots in both species. The auxin response, as shown by the activation of the DR5 promoter, seemed significantly reduced in nodules compared to roots of both species, suggesting the accumulation of auxins in cell types that do not express the signal transduction pathway leading to DR5 activation. Effects on root development were analyzed for the synthetic auxin naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and PAA, the dominant auxin in nodules. Both auxins had similar effects, except that the sensitivity of roots to PAA was lower than to NAA. However, while the effects of both auxins on primary root growth were similar for both species, effects on root branching were different: both auxins had the classical positive effect on root branching in M. truncatula, but a negative effect in D. glomerata. Such a negative effect of exogenous auxin on root branching has previously been found for a cucurbit that forms lateral root primordia in the meristem of the parental root; however, root branching in D. glomerata does not follow that pattern.

  • 4.
    Demina, Irina V.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Ng, Liang J. P.
    Division of Plant Science, Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Linnaeus Way, ACT 0200 Canberra, Australia.
    van der Graaff, Eric
    Department of Plant Physiology, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz, 8010 Graz, Austria.
    Roitsch, Thomas
    Department of Plant Physiology, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz, 8010 Graz, Austria.
    Mathesius, Ulrike
    Division of Plant Science, Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Linnaeus Way, ACT 0200 Canberra, Australia.
    Pawlowski, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Auxins and cytokinins in roots, hairy roots and nodules of the actinorhizal plant Datisca glomerata and the model legume Medicago truncatulaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Demina, Irina V.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Pawlowski, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Cysteine-rich peptide genes are expressed in the infected nodule cells of the actinorhizal plant Datisca glomerataManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Demina, Irina V.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Persson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Santos, Patricia
    Plaszczyca, Marian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Pawlowski, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Comparison of the Nodule vs. Root Transcriptome of the Actinorhizal Plant Datisca glomerata: Actinorhizal Nodules Contain a Specific Class of Defensins2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 8, p. e72442-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Actinorhizal root nodule symbioses are very diverse, and the symbiosis of Datisca glomerata has previously been shown to have many unusual aspects. In order to gain molecular information on the infection mechanism, nodule development and nodule metabolism, we compared the transcriptomes of D. glomerata roots and nodules. Root and nodule libraries representing the 3'-ends of cDNAs were subjected to high-throughput parallel 454 sequencing. To identify the corresponding genes and to improve the assembly, Illumina sequencing of the nodule transcriptome was performed as well. The evaluation revealed 406 differentially regulated genes, 295 of which (72.7%) could be assigned a function based on homology. Analysis of the nodule transcriptome showed that genes encoding components of the common symbiosis signaling pathway were present in nodules of D. glomerata, which in combination with the previously established function of SymRK in D. glomerata nodulation suggests that this pathway is also active in actinorhizal Cucurbitales. Furthermore, comparison of the D. glomerata nodule transcriptome with nodule transcriptomes from actinorhizal Fagales revealed a new subgroup of nodule-specific defensins that might play a role specific to actinorhizal symbioses. The D. glomerata members of this defensin subgroup contain an acidic C-terminal domain that was never found in plant defensins before.

  • 7.
    Persson, Tomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Battenberg, Kai
    Demina, Irina V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Vigil-Stenman, Theoden
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Heuvel, Brian Vanden
    Pujic, Petar
    Facciotti, Marc T.
    Wilbanks, Elizabeth G.
    O'Brien, Anna
    Fournier, Pascale
    Hernandez, Maria Antonia Cruz
    Herrera, Alberto Mendoza
    Medigue, Claudine
    Normand, Philippe
    Pawlowski, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Berry, Alison M.
    Candidatus Frankia Datiscae Dg1, the Actinobacterial Microsymbiont of Datisca glomerata, Expresses the Canonical nod Genes nodABC in Symbiosis with Its Host Plant2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0127630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Frankia strains are nitrogen-fixing soil actinobacteria that can form root symbioses with actinorhizal plants. Phylogenetically, symbiotic frankiae can be divided into three clusters, and this division also corresponds to host specificity groups. The strains of cluster II which form symbioses with actinorhizal Rosales and Cucurbitales, thus displaying a broad host range, show suprisingly low genetic diversity and to date can not be cultured. The genome of the first representative of this cluster, Candidatus Frankia datiscae Dg1 (Dg1), a microsymbiont of Datisca glomerata, was recently sequenced. A phylogenetic analysis of 50 different housekeeping genes of Dg1 and three published Frankia genomes showed that cluster II is basal among the symbiotic Frankia clusters. Detailed analysis showed that nodules of Datisca glomerata, independent of the origin of the inoculum, contain several closely related cluster II Frankia operational taxonomic units. Actinorhizal plants and legumes both belong to the nitrogen-fixing plant clade, and bacterial signaling in both groups involves the common symbiotic pathway also used by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. However, so far, no molecules resembling rhizobial Nod factors could be isolated from Frankia cultures. Alone among Frankia genomes available to date, the genome of Dg1 contains the canonical nod genes nodA, nodB and nodC known from rhizobia, and these genes are arranged in two operons which are expressed in Datisca glomerata nodules. Furthermore, Frankia Dg1 nodC was able to partially complement a Rhizobium leguminosarum A34 nodC::Tn5 mutant. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Dg1 Nod proteins are positioned at the root of both alpha- and beta-rhizobial NodABC proteins. NodA-like acyl transferases were found across the phylum Actinobacteria, but among Proteobacteria only in nodulators. Taken together, our evidence indicates an Actinobacterial origin of rhizobial Nod factors.

  • 8.
    Persson, Tomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Demina, Irina V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Vanden Heuvel, Brian
    Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Pueblo 16, CO 81001, USA.
    Pujic, Petar
    Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, CNRS, Ecologie Microbienne UMR5557, Cedex 69622 Villeurbanne, France.
    Fournier, Pascale
    Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, CNRS, Ecologie Microbienne UMR5557, Cedex 69622 Villeurbanne, France.
    Normand, Philippe
    Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, CNRS, Ecologie Microbienne UMR5557, Cedex 69622 Villeurbanne, France.
    Médigue, Claudine
    Génoscope, Evry, France.
    Pawlowski, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Berry, Alison M.
    Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
    Candidatus Frankia datiscae Dg1, the actinobacterial symbiont of Datisca glomerata, is a member of the basal clade of symbiotic frankiae and expresses the common nod genesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 8 of 8
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