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  • 1.
    Irina, Rasmussen Goloubeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Review of Maurizia Boscagli and Enda Duffy (eds.). Joyce, Benjamin and Magical Urbanism. Amsterdam: Rodopi (2011).2013In: James Joyce Broadsheet, ISSN 0143-6333, no 96Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Rasmussen Goloubeva, Irina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Avant-garde "Oxen"2014In: James Joyce Broadsheet, ISSN 0143-6333, Vol. February, no 97Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    THE 'OXEN OF THE SUN' episode of Ulysses is set at the National Maternity hospitalin Dublin and by Joycean standards its plot is relatively unambiguous. It presentsa group of young Dubliners, some of whom are students or professionals inthe field of medicine, discussing national politics, demographics and sexuality. Theirdebate dips in and out of the social theories concerning history, economics, philosophy, naturalhistory, anthropology, eugenics and social Darwinism, with state-of-the-art refractions ofthe narrative voice through canonical styles of English prose. In contrast to the predictable,evolutionary trajectory of the plot, the debaters' say-sos, the barrage of mild indecencies andthe explicit subject matter generate a dense textuality and ambiguous ideologies.

  • 3.
    Rasmussen Goloubeva, Irina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Curating Art, Rewriting World History: Nancy Cunard’s Negro: An Anthology (1934)2014In: Ethics and Poetics: Recognitions and Social Reconfigurations in Modern Fiction / [ed] Margrét Gunnarsdottír Champion and Irina Rasmussen Goloubeva., Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014, p. 241-268Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Rasmussen Goloubeva, Irina
    Stockholm University.
    "Molly Bloom: A Re-Immersion in the Concrete"2010In: James Joyce Quarterly, ISSN 0021-4183, E-ISSN 1938-6036, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 395-415Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Rasmussen Goloubeva, Irina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    "That's the Music of the Future": James Joyce's Ulusses and the Writing of a Difficult History2013In: Modernism/Modernity, ISSN 1071-6068, E-ISSN 1080-6601, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 685-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The modernists' obsession with history is well known. Responding to the ineluctable pace of modernization that threatened to sweep away the past, some modernists celebrated the loss and welcomed the new world; others engaged the historical imagination by capturing the disappearing world and the intransigent present. The actual difference between these two forms of modernist historical imagination is, however, not so tidy and complete, reflecting both the general disjunction between modernity's historical and anti-historical instincts and history's inexorable traces in the collective unconscious. James Joyce's adaptation of an epic perspective in Ulysses, however absurd and half serious, is instinctively historical and characteristically works both ways. He revels in the intoxicating dynamic of the new fast-changing world while at the same time obstinately working to capture the historicity of a disappearing present.

  • 6.
    Rasmussen Goloubeva, Irina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Champion Gunnarsdottír, MargrétGothenburg University.
    Ethics and poetics: Ethical Recognitions and Social Reconfigurations in Modern Narratives2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Rasmussen Goloubeva, Irina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    McGarry, Matthew
    Acmeism2016In: Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism, Routledge, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Rasmussen, Irina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    'En avant, mes enfants!': Nations, Populations, and the Avant-Garde Body in James Joyce's 'Oxen of the Sun'2019In: Comparative Literature, ISSN 0010-4124, E-ISSN 1945-8517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the “Oxen of the Sun” episode of Ulysses James Joyce dramatizes the evolution of English prose styles by creating a stylistic matrix for gestation. The episode’s evolutionary features are well known. In his clues for the episode, Joyce refers to recapitulation as a key structural principle and suggests that “Oxen”’s master symbol, the womb, encapsulates the synchronized processes of language and embryo growth. Apart from the centrality of the evolutionary design, however, the episode persistently achieves more, if not something else completely. This essay addresses “Oxen”’s complexity by highlighting a connection between its evolutionary form and its avant-garde tactics, a conjunction that has not been sufficiently explored. The larger argument at stake in this analysis is that the episode’s evolutionary design and its tactics of rupture work together to dislocate and reimagine the rhetoric of national conception that dominated Irish political discourse. By foregrounding how the English prose styles work as gateways to liberal discourses on statehood, national health, economy, politics, and sexuality, the essay argues that “Oxen”’s stylistic evolution reveals ways in which the body politic and the physical body are entangled through life processes. The episode’s culminating style of the modern idiom, its famous contemporary noisy English vernaculars, points to an avant-garde orientation of Joyce evolution. The “crushing” prose of these corrupted vernaculars suggests a symbolic rupture within the texture of the social and raises several questions: How far does Joyce take his literary experiment and whether he is marching in step with the artistic revolutionaries of his time or offers a trial run for something completely different? By foregrounding the episode’s radical aesthetics, its avant-garde tactics and tropes, the essay attempts to understand the rationale behind “Oxen”’s stylistic evolution and its raising of modernity’s socially disruptive forces.

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