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  • 1. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Revisiting the jacquard loom: threads of history and current patterns in HCI2012In: CHI '12 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 1593-1602Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the recent developments of human computer interaction, one central challenge has been to find and to explore alternatives to the legacy of the desktop computer paradigm for interaction design. To investigate this issue further we have conducted an analysis on a fascinating piece of machinery often referred to as one of the predecessors of the modern day computer, the Jacquard loom. In analysing the Jacquard loom we look at qualities in design and interaction from some different perspectives: how historical tools, crafts, and practices can inform interaction design, the role of physicality, materiality, and full-body interaction in order to rethink some current conceptions of interaction and design of computational devices.

  • 2. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    McMillan, DonaldStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Girouard, AudreyTholander, JakobStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Proceedings of the Twelfth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welcome to ACM TEI'18, the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interactions, hosted at KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, in Stockholm, Sweden, from the 18th to the 21st of March 2018. This is TEI's first visit to Scandinavia! The TEI conference series is dedicated to issues of human-computer interaction, novel tools and technologies, interactive art, and user experience. This year's conference focuses on the concepts of physical and material interaction through the lens of Post-Digital Design. The digital has become mundane, inseparable from our everyday experiences. In post-digital design we see a turn to vintage materials and craftsmanship, but also to real world circumstances of human bodies on a global scale. Old media and natural materials have regained interest for interaction designers, and traditional practices are being cherished in new ways as part of digital experiences. Designing for the post-digital does not mean blindly embracing nostalgia or turning away from technology - it means embracing a process of design that equalizes the status of digital, analogue, electronic, mechanical and tactile, and that brings focus to form, meaning and function, rather than technicalities. The intimate size of this single-track conference provides a unique forum for exchanging ideas and presenting innovative work through talks, interactive exhibits, demos, hands-on studios, posters, art installations and performances. TEI'18 hosts a four-day program, starting on Sunday March 18th with the Graduate Student Consortium and a series of Studios that engage participants in the concrete making of novel interfaces and interactions. The main program starts with an opening keynote on Monday March 19th, followed by a series of talks on shape changing materials, followed by a hands-on session showcasing Work in Progress demonstrations as well as exemplars from full papers accepted to the proceedings. The Tuesday starts with the remainder of the demonstrations and the Student Design Challenge, this year with a theme of common place, mundane technologies from the future. Paper presentations on technology for children, and Virtual and Augmented reality precede a second session of demos from full paper submissions. The evening of the second day finds the conference in Kulturhuset, Stadsteatern, one of the largest cultural institutions in Northern Europe, for a curated exhibition of art installations and live performances exploring the post-digital. A total of 25 works will be presented over the evening, which is also open to the public. On Wednesday, March 21st, sessions present talks on evaluation and community, followed by a closing panel session.

  • 3.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Patcher: A Tangible Game for Making Ecology Simulations in Museum Setting2007In: Tangible Play: Research and Design for Tangible and Tabletop Games, 2007, p. 25-28Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a tangible game for collaborative construction of ecological simulations. The system has been designed for and evaluated in the context of school classes visiting the Nature in Sweden exhibition at the Museum of Natural History in Stockholm. Based on card-based interaction using RFID-technology, the system affords discussion and collaborative play, leading to animated simulations displayed on a large screen. We discuss how technologies like this afford playful learning experience, especially in collaborative activities such as field trips to a museum.

  • 4. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Södertörn University College, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University College, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Beyond representations: towards an action centric perspective on tangible interaction2008In: International Journal of Arts and Technology, ISSN 1754-8853, Vol. 1, no 3/4, p. 249-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the light of theoretical as well as concrete technical development, we discuss a conceptual shift from an information-centric to an action-centric perspective on tangible interactive technology. We explicitly emphasise the qualities of shareable use, and the importance of designing tangibles that allow for meaningful manipulation and control of the digital material. This involves a broadened focus from studying properties of the interface, to instead aim for qualities of the activity of using a system, a general tendency towards designing for social and sharable use settings and an increased openness towards multiple and subjective interpretations. An effect of this is that tangibles are not designed as representations of data, but as resources for action. We discuss four ways that tangible artefacts work as resources for action: (1) for physical manipulation; (2) for referential, social and contextually oriented action; (3) for perception and sensory experience; (4) for digitally mediated action.

  • 5. Halpern, Megan
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    MoBoogie: creative expression through whole body musical interaction2011In: CHI '11 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: ACM Press, 2011, p. 557-560Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe MoBoogie, an application that allows users to manipulate and arrange music through movement. MoBoogie is designed to foster experiences in creative expression for children and potentially adults. The application responds to users' movements by changing variables in a continuous stream of music loops. Results from this study suggest that the creative expressions arose in the joint space of movement and music, and did not primarily have to be in one form or the other. This allowed users with limited experience in dance and music making to be creative in such forms of expression.

  • 6.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola.
    Ju, Wendy
    Stanford University.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Tholander, Jakob
    Södertörns högskola.
    Zeynep, Ahmet
    Södertörns högskola.
    Sumon, Saiful Islam
    Södertörns högskola.
    Acholonu, Ugochi
    Stanford University.
    Winograd, Terry
    Stanford University.
    Wii Science: Teaching the laws of nature with physically engaging video game technologies2010In: CHI 2010 Workshop: Video Games as Research Instruments (10-15 April 2010, Atlanta, GA, USA), ACM Press , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7. Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    Caramiaux, Baptiste
    Erkut, Cumhur
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    Hajinejad, Nassrin
    Haller, Michael
    Hummels, Caroline C. M.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Jonsson, Martin
    Khut, George
    Loke, Lian
    Lottridge, Danielle
    Marti, Patrizia
    Melcer, Edward
    Müller, Florian Floyd
    Petersen, Marianne Graves
    Schiphorst, Thecla
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Ståhl, Anna
    Svanaes, Dag
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design2018In: Informatics, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A set of prominent designers embarked on a research journey to explore aesthetics in movement-based design. Here we unpack one of the design sensitivities unique to our practice: a strong first person perspective-where the movements, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, design researcher and user are at the forefront. We present an annotated portfolio of design exemplars and a brief introduction to some of the design methods and theory we use, together substantiating and explaining the first-person perspective. At the same time, we show how this felt dimension, despite its subjective nature, is what provides rigor and structure to our design research. Our aim is to assist researchers in soma-based design and designers wanting to consider the multiple facets when designing for the aesthetics of movement. The applications span a large field of designs, including slow introspective, contemplative interactions, arts, dance, health applications, games, work applications and many others.

  • 8. Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Poonkhin Khut, George
    Move to be moved2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 3301-3308Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based design is reaching critical mass in HCI, and we can start to identify strategies, similarities and differences in how it is approached. Similarities may include, for example, a strong first person perspective on design, emphasising movement, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, as well as starting from the premise that our bodily ways of being in the world are shaped by the ecologies of people, cultural practices and the artefacts we create and use. Different classes of systems are starting to emerge, such as spurring somaesthetic appreciation processes using biofeedback loops or carefully nudging us to interact with our own movements; engaging us in affective loops where the technology takes on a stronger agency, attempting to pull participants into particular experiences; extending on our senses and perception -- even creating new senses through technology; social interactions, engaging us to jointly explore movement or touch; even endowing machines with their own "somatics", exploring our relationship to technology; as well as engaging in larger political issues around the body, such as gender perspectives, or challenging the mind-body divide.

  • 9.
    Jonsson, Martin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Technology and Design, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Forum 100, SE-164 40 Kista, Sweden (sic).
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Forum 100, SE-164 40 Kista, Sweden (sic).
    Setting the stage – Embodied and spatial dimensions in emerging programming practices2009In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 21, no 1-2, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the design of interactive systems, developers sometimes need to engage in various ways of physical performance in order to communicate ideas and to test out properties of the system to be realised. External resources such as sketches, as well as bodily action, often play important parts in such processes, and several methods and tools that explicitly address such aspects of interaction design have recently been developed. This combined with the growing range of pervasive, ubiquitous, and tangible technologies add up to a complex web of physicality within the practice of designing interactive systems. We illustrate this dimension of systems development through three cases which in different ways address the design of systems where embodied performance is important. The first case shows how building a physical sport simulator emphasises a shift in activity between programming and debugging. The second case shows a build-once run-once scenario, where the fine-tuning and control of the run-time activity gets turned into an act of in situ performance by the programmers. The third example illustrates the explorative and experiential nature of programming and debugging systems for specialised and autonomous interaction devices. This multitude in approaches in existing programming settings reveals an expanded perspective of what practices of interaction design consist of, emphasising the interlinking between design, programming, and performance with the system that is being developed.

  • 10.
    Landwehr Sydow, Sophie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jonsson, Martin
    "It's a Bomb!" – Material Literacy and Narratives of Making2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 121-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses a series of events in which a discarded box found in a garbage room is examined and taken apart in the context of a makerspace. The participants' inquiry provided a rich and multifaceted experience in various settings, including puzzle-solving, exploring physical and digital materials, engaging people with different skills. The social engagements with and around the artifacts brought certain interpretative aspects to the fore. Situated acts of interpretation worked as ways of building a coherent narrative and a meaningful experience. In the paper, we highlight the relationship between on the one hand the subjects' skills and motivations to understand and make sense of the technology at hand which we call material literacy, and on the other hand the specific material qualities that encourage or trigger certain interpretations and experiences. The qualities we discuss are: opacity, risk, authenticity, uniqueness, age, and hybridity. This study allows us to reposition the contemporary understanding of makerspaces beyond that of being places for innovation and learning.

  • 11. Mueller, Florian Floyd
    et al.
    Marshall, Joe
    Ashok Koth, Rohit
    Nylander, Stina
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Understanding Sports-HCI by Going Jogging at CHI2015In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 869-872Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More and more technologies are emerging that aim to support sports activities, for example there are jogging apps, cycling computers and quadcopters for sportspeople to videorecord their actions. These new technologies appear to become more and more popular, yet interaction design knowledge how to support the associated exertion experiences is still limited. In order to bring practitioners and academics interested in sports-HCI together and examine the topic "in the wild", we propose to go outside and jog around the CHI venue while using and discussing some of these new technologies. The goal is to investigate and shape the future of the field of sports-HCI.

  • 12. Mueller, Florian "Floyd"
    et al.
    Marshall, Joe
    Koht, Rohit Ashok
    Nylander, Stina
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jogging at CHI2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 1119-1122Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    HCI is increasingly paying attention to sports, and more and more CHI attendees are aiming to maintain being physically active while attending CHI. In response, we offer a SIG on the topic of sports-HCI and conduct it in a sportive way: we will go out of the conference venue and jog around San Jose while discussing the role of HCI in relation to sports. The goal is to actively shape the future of the field of sports-HCI.

  • 13. Normark, Maria
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Performativity in sustainable interaction: the case of seasonal grocery shopping in ecofriends2014In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: ACM Press, 2014, p. 271-280Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EcoFriends application was developed as an attempt to support grocery shopping adjusted to vegetables’ seasonality through a performative approach to interaction and interactive applications. The design aimed at critical reflection and inspiration among users, rather than achieving a certain kind of persuasion. This guided the practical design to be modelled around open-endedness and social voices to challenge ideas and points of view. We argue that research addressing design for interactions about value-laden concepts such as sustainable action need to find ways of supporting various knowledge discourses, b.y distinguishing between performative and representational technologies. The approach allowed us to identify a number of critical issuesdesign challenges regarding interactive technology and interaction design in relation to aspects of knowledge and truth, trust, negotiation and responsibility.

  • 14. Nylander, Stina
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Community-Based Innovation among Elite Orienteers2017In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Communities and Technologies, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 87-95Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have studied a form of community innovation within the sport of orienteering, which in the Nordic countries consist of a closely knit group with a strong sense of community. This study shows how the processes for developing new technologies are driven by a strong sense of idealism, with little or no commercial motivation. Thus, this represents a kind of community development and sharing with a number of unique characteristics. While the community is central to participants' endeavours of developing their systems, the participants are not representative of the typical member. On the contrary, they are examples of a minority that put in significant efforts of contributing to the larger group. What we argue is unique about the case we have presented is that the technology development starts out from a few number of highly motivated individuals that through limited collaboration with others builds technologies that get extensive proliferation and use within the community.

  • 15. Nylander, Stina
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Drifting off course: how sports technology can use real-time data to add new dimensions to sports2016In: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 1-4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have built Drift, an application that measures and provides feedback on how far from the ideal path an orienteer has deviated, to study how sports apps can draw on real-time data to enrich sports activities. Orienteering is an outdoor navigation sport requiring mental skills and fast running through the terrain. Participants appropriated deviation into their practice and found a variety of ways it could integrate with common orienteering practice. Interaction around deviation provided possibilities for new forms of sporting practice and social interactions. Deviation as a measure allowed this because it was highly specific and well-grounded in a specific skill of the sport. We believe this use of data in real time has the possibility of supporting and renewing sports activity as well as offering new opportunities for design.

  • 16. Nylander, Stina
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sports as an Example Domain for Collection of Personal Information2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sports is a good example domain for understanding how to deal with collection, understanding, and analyzing personal data, since special purpose tools for this has been available in sports for a long time. Our previous work in sports indicate that new measures might help athletes to make use of their collected data. We believe that the thinking around new measures also is relevant for personal information in general.

  • 17. Nylander, Stina
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tactile feedback in real life sports: a pilot study from cross-country skiing2012In: HAID '12 The Seventh International Workshop on Haptic and Audio Interaction Design: Short papers, demos and posters / [ed] Charlotte Magnusson, 2012, p. 35-37Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the research challenges of bringing HCI into the domain of sports, and what research in this domain can add to the general questions multi-modality and sensor-based interaction. To illustrate this, we present results from a pilot study on providing tactile feedback to cross-country skiers. Our results show how real-time feedback can be provided for a variety of purposes without disrupting or disturbing the actual sporting experience

  • 18. nylander, stina
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    Runright: real-time visual and audio feedback on running2014In: CHI EA '14 CHI '14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: ACM Press, 2014, p. 583-586Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RunRight is a system that gives two different kinds of feedback for runners. First, it creates a visualization of the running movement based on acceleration in vertical and horizontal direction. Second it gives audio feedback on the rhythm. These two types of feedback are valuable when exploring how to design technology that supports athletes in learning how a desired movement should feel.

  • 19. Nylander, Stina
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Kent, Alex
    Peripheral interaction for sports – exploring two modalities for real-time feedback2013In: Peripheral Interaction: Embedding HCI in EverydayLife: Workshop at INTERACT 2013 – 14th IFIP TC13 Conference on Human-Computer Interaction / [ed] Doris Hausen, Saskia Bakker, Elise van den Hoven, Andreas Butz, Berry Eggen, INTERACT , 2013, p. 27-32Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We believe that sports is a domain that would both provide valuable input to the area of peripheral interaction, as well as benefit from peripheral interaction itself. We present two pilot studies on peripheral interaction for crosscountry skiing and golf using vibration feedback and audio feedback respectively. We believe the results of these initial studies are encouraging and aim to pursue the concept of peripheral interaction for the sports domain.

  • 20. Nylander, Stina
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Kent, Alex
    Swing sound: experiencing the golf swing through sound2014In: SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: proceedings, New York: ACM Press, 2014, p. 443-446Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SwingSound is a system that creates an audio mirror of your golf swing in real time, in order to explore various dimensions of interaction design in sports, such as feedback, representation, and multimodality. At CHI interactivity we will allow the audience to practically try out this system by hitting golf balls into a net, thereby re-experiencing their golf swing in a new modality.

  • 21. Nylander, Stina
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mueller, Florian "Floyd"
    Marshall, Joe
    HCI and sports2014In: CHI '14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Proceeding, ACM Press, 2014, p. 115-118Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport is an area in which the number of available computing devices is growing rapidly. However, HCI has so far devoted rather little attention to the sports domain. This workshop aims to form a community around sports by gathering existing activity in the HCI domain, thus starting a discussion on what HCI can contribute to the sports domain, as well as what HCI can gain from studying sports.

  • 22.
    Ramberg, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Artman, Henrik
    Karlgren, Klas
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rollen hos representationer och agerande inom interaktionsdesign2014In: Resultatdialog 2014, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rostami, Asreen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Fischione, Carlo
    Turchet, Luca
    Musicians' initial encounters with a smart guitar2018In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 13-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a case study of a fully working prototype of the Sensus smart guitar. Eleven professional guitar players were interviewed after a prototype test session. The smartness of the guitar was perceived as enabling the integration of a range of equipment into a single device, and the proactive exploration of novel expressions. The results draw attention to the musicians' sense-making of the smart qualities, and to the perceived impact on their artistic practices. The themes highlight how smartness was experienced in relation to the guitar's agency and the skills it requires, the tension between explicit (e.g. playing a string) and implicit (e.g. keeping rhythm) body movements, and to performing and producing music. Understanding this felt sense of smartness is relevant to how contemporary HCI research conceptualizes mundane artefacts enhanced with smart technologies, and to how such discourse can inform related design issues.

  • 24. Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    Kosmack-Vaara, Elsa
    Being, Bringing and Bridging: Three Aspects of Sketching with Nature2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 1309-1320Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We articulate and reflect on the use of nature as a sketching material. We have closely documented explorations of various organic and non-organic materials found during excursions in a local forest and how we used them as resources in sketching. This serves as an exemplar case of how sketching in interaction design can be grounded in empirical explorations of nature. We discuss three examples of sketching based on explorations and experiences with elements and objects from a forest. Processes and characteristics of phenomena in nature such falling leaves, melting and freezing of snow, and perennial growth allowed us to expand our design repertoire and sketching skills, especially as new forms of representations and interactions. Based on this we outline three aspects of how nature can be included in sketching processes: being in nature, bringing nature to the lab, and bridging nature and interaction design.

  • 25.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Using body cards in a design process for going from bodily experiences to design2014In: Proceeding BCS-HCI '14 Proceedings of the 28th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference on HCI 2014 - Sand, Sea and Sky - Holiday HCI, ACM Digital Library, 2014, p. 141-150Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To build creative links between ethnographic findings of bodily practices and design, we developed so called body cards to document experiential qualities to be used in idea generation and early prototyping. These focus on the stages of a design process that involves investigating a use domain and making such knowledge relevant and usable for design. This involves challenges of effectively describing – with theoretical and empirical grounding - how bodily action and experience actually occur, in relation to people, artefacts, and activities. We discuss challenges in bridging between ethnographic findings and design of technologies for bodily experiences. Designing for the body in interaction is then not only about better ways of sensing bodily actions, but just as much about integrating these in the space of social interaction.

  • 26.
    Tholander, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    "Nästan som ett spel": barns roller och perspektiv vid datorprogrammering2007In: Datorspelandets dynamik: lekar och roller i en digital kultur / [ed] Jonas Linderoth, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2007, p. 161-184Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Tholander, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    Ecofriends: designing for critical reflection using social voices2013In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 58-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Tholander, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    Nylander, Stina
    Experiencing art through kinesthetic dialogue2014In: DIS '14 Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Designing interactive systems, New York: ACM Press, 2014, p. 113-116Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the analysis of how the Lega, a touch, motion, and location sensitive device that allows museum visitors to share their experiences, we identified kinaesthetic dialogue as an orienting concept for the understanding and the design of movement-based social interaction and experiences. It provides an analytical lens which captures critical aspects of kinaesthetic action in aesthetic experiences, as well as for better understanding of how users appropriate such artefacts in interaction. We believe that kinaesthetic dialog is a promising candidate for a meta-concept to capture interaction design knowledge in movement based technologies.

  • 29.
    Tholander, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Normark, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and IT, .
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Understanding Agency in Interaction Design Materials2012In: CHI '12 Proceedings of the 2012 ACM annual conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Press, 2012, p. 2499-2508Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we draw on the concept of agency in order to understand the process of how design materials ‘talk back’ to designers. In so doing, we illustrate the various levels at which agency can emerge in the context of intensive short-time prototyping sessions. It is often assumed in HCI that the designer is the agent that acts intentionally in the process. In this case, when viewing student projects, it became visible that design is to a large extent driven by characteristics of available materials. Recent theories on agency provide a way of analyzing the performative role of design materials as intra-actions between components in a given phenomenon, rather than meanings ascribed by the singular actions of the designers. The notion of agency provided a focus on how the emerging properties of materials and how they actively contributed to the way that design activity unfolds. The results have implications for the conceptual language of material interaction as well as theoretical approaches for the understanding materiality in interaction design.

  • 30.
    Tholander, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nylander, Stina
    Designing for Movement: the Case of Sports2014In: MOCO '14: proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Movement and Computing, June 16 - 17, 2014 Ircam, Paris, France, New York: ACM Press, 2014, p. 130-135Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have identified six themes we identified as interesting for future work in movement based interaction design for sports: the central position of the subjective feeling, the core of sports is enough, feeling did not prevent injury, non-interpretive representations, the shortcomings of logging biodata, and temporality of feedback. The themes are grounded in technical explorations for golf and running and a set of interviews with athletes. Here, we outline findings from our work to illustrate these themes.

  • 31.
    Tholander, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nylander, Stina
    Measures for collaborative running2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We outline the notion of measures as a way of structuring the designing interactive sport technologies. Contrary to building fully working applications, measures suggest that designers should focus on the lower level measures of an sports activity and how users may incorporate these into their experiences. For this workshop we would like to explore the idea of collaborative measures in running.

  • 32.
    Tholander, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nylander, Stina
    Snot, Sweat, Pain, Mud, and Snow: Performance and Experience in the Use of Sports Watches2015In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 2913-2922Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    We have conducted interviews with ten elite and recreational athletes to understand their experiences and engagement with endurance sport and personal and wearable sports technology. The athletes emphasized the experiential aspects of doing sports and the notion of feeling was repeatedly used to talk about their activities. Technology played both an instrumental role in measuring performance and feeding bio-data back to them, and an experiential role in supporting and enhancing the sport experience. To guide further interaction design research in the sports domain, we suggest two interrelated ways of looking at sports performances and experiences, firstly through the notion of a measured sense of performance, and secondly as a lived-sense of performance.

  • 33.
    Tholander, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Datorspel i skolan: Barns och lärares kunskapande med datorspel i skolan2006In: Resultatdialog 2006: forskning inom utbildningsvetenskap, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2006, p. 165-170Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Tholander, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ståhl, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Schultz, Lisen
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Borgström, Sara
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Normark, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Kosmack-Vaara, Elsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    But I Don’t Trust My Friends: Ecofriends - An Application for Reflective Grocery Shopping2012In: MobileHCI '12 Proceedings of the 2012 ACM annual conference on Human Computer Interaction With Mobile Devices and Services, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 143-146Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ecofriends application was designed to encourage people to reflect on their everyday grocery shopping from social and ecological perspectives. Ecofriends portrays the seasonality of various grocery products as being socially constructed, emphasizing subjective dimensions of what it means for a product to be in season, rather than attempting to communicate it as an established fact. It provides the user with unexpected information (news, weather, blog posts and tweets) about the place where the product was grown, and visualises how the product’s popularity shifts throughout the year, among the user’s friends, among chefs and other food experts, and the general public. Key findings from users’ first encounters with the system are presented. In particular, we discuss aspects of trust, information fragments as catalysts, and how several of the participants were challenged by the system’s portrayal of season.

1 - 34 of 34
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