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  • 1. Bergström, J.
    et al.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Maurits Lindström2009Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Kleman, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Stroeven, Arjen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Patterns of Quaternary ice sheet erosion and deposition in Fennoscandia and a theoretical framework for explanation2008In: Geomorphology, Vol. 97, no 1-2, 73-90 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    It has long been recognised that the formerly glaciated area of Fennoscandia shows large spatial differences in thicknesses of

    Quaternary deposits (mainly tills), and exhibits distinct patterns of glacial scouring and deep linear erosion. The reasons for this

    striking zonation have been elusive, and in particular the relative roles of mountain ice sheets (MIS) and full-sized Fennoscandian

    ice sheets (FIS) in shaping the landscape surface need clarification. On the basis of current advances in our understanding of the

    climate evolution and basal thermal organisation of ice sheets, we perform spatio-temporal qualitative modelling of ice sheet extent

    and migration of erosion and deposition zones through the entire Quaternary, and proceed to suggest an explanatory model for the

    current spatial pattern of Quaternary deposits and the two different types of erosion zones. We use the spatial distribution of fjords

    and deep non-tectonic lakes for delineating zones of deep glacial erosion, and relict landscapes as markers for frozen-bed

    conditions. On the basis of the amount of exposed bedrock, the landscape was classified into a tripartite system of drift thickness

    (thick drift, intermediate drift thickness, absence of drift/scoured zones). It is found that a centrally placed (central and northern

    Sweden) zone of thick drift cannot be explained by deposition under FIS style ice sheets, but is instead likely to be the combined

    result of marginal deposition of fluctuating MIS style ice sheets, primarily during the early and middle Quaternary, and the

    inefficiency of later east-centered FIS style ice sheets in evacuating this drift from underneath their central low-velocity and

    possibly frozen-bed areas. The western (fjord) zone of deep glacial erosion formed underneath both MIS- and FIS style ice sheets

    during the entire Quaternary, while the eastern (lake) zone of deep glacial erosion is exclusively related to MIS style ice sheets, and

    formed largely during the early and middle Quaternary. The scouring zones formed under conditions of rapid ice flow towards

    bathymetrically-defined calving margins of FIS style ice sheets. They likely reflect process patterns of the last two or three FIS

    style ice sheets. The three landscape zones differ in their degree of permanence, with the deep erosion zones being a long-lasting

    legacy in the landscape, more likely to be enhanced than obliterated by subsequent glacial events. The thick drift cover zone, once

    established, appears to have been surprisingly robust to erosion by subsequent glacial events. The scouring zones appear to be the

    most recent and ephemeral of the three zones, with possible major alterations during single glacial events.

  • 3.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Atle-Tor och Ragnarök2013In: Geologiskt forum, ISSN 1104-4721, no 79, 14-15 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Den gåtfulla tinguaiten från Särna2013In: Geologiskt forum, ISSN 1104-4721, no 80, 22-25 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    DEPOSITS FROM LANDSLIDES AND AVALANCHES TRIGGERED BY SEISMIC ACTIVITY IN SWEDISH LAPLAND2010In: Geografiska Annaler. Series A, Physical Geography, ISSN 0435-3676, E-ISSN 1468-0459, Vol. 92A, no 3, 411-420 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the mountain area of Swedish Lapland, landforms with semicircular or horse-shoe ridges encircling hummocky ground occur They are interpreted as landslide or avalanche deposits directly upon, from or adjacent to down-wasting ice Since they are restricted to the vicinity of fault scarps in the Parvie fault system the releasing factor is suggested to be displacement of bedrock blocks or related seismic activity.

  • 6.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Kampen om kvartär2011In: Geologiskt forum, ISSN 1104-4721, Vol. 70, no 2, 8-11 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Klarälvens meanderlopp2013In: Geologiskt forum, ISSN 1104-4721, no 77, 18-23 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Myrmarkernas mästare2013In: Geologiskt forum, ISSN 1104-4721, no 78, 24-27 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    När inlandsisen lämnade Jämtlandsfjällen2012In: Geologiskt Forum, ISSN 1104-4721, no 73, 10-17 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Surging ice and break-down of an ice dome - a deglaciation model for the Gulf of Bothnia2007In: GFF, Vol. 129, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on studies of striae in the Kvarken area in the northern part of the Baltic basin, and re-interpretation of stratigraphic sequences earlier interpreted as evidence of a readvance of the ice margin in the Gulf of Bothnia a model for the deglaciation of the Gulf is proposed. The model implies quick break-up of the ice due to areal thinning of an ice lobe in the Gulf and change from cold-based to warm-based ice. Wide calving bays were formed close to and into the centre of the ice in the northern part of the Gulf. The change of balance caused sudden collapses in the centre followed by surges upon the warming base of soft ductile sediments. The effect was a westward shift of the ice centre from the Gulf area towards the mountain range. The ice sheet changed from a thick one with a subaquatic margin into a thin, terrestrial one, thus becoming more sensitive to the rising temperature at the end of the Weichselian glaciation

  • 11.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Surging ice and break-down of an ice dome - a deglaciation model for the Gulf of Bothnia2007In: GFF, Vol. 129, no 4, 329-336 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Offerberg, Jan
    Harald Johansson2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13. Mangerud, J.
    et al.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Ehlers, J.
    Gibbard, P. L.
    Late glacial events in northwest Europe2007In: Encyclopedia of Quaternary Science, Elsevier , 2007, 1116-1122 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14. Näslund, Jens-Ove
    et al.
    Wohlfarth, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geology and Geochemistry.
    Alexanderson, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Helmens, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Hättestrand, Martina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Jansson, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Kleman, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Brandefelt, Jenny
    Houmark-Nielsen, Michael
    Kjellström, Erik
    Strandberg, Gustav
    Knudsen, Karen-Luise
    Krog Larsen, Nikolai
    Ukkonen, Pirkko
    Mangerud, Jan
    Fennoscandian paleo-environment and ice sheet dynamics during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3: Report of a workshop held September 20–21, 2007 in Stockholm, Sweden2008Report (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Stroeven, Arjen P.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Hättestrand, Clas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Kleman, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Heyman, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Fabel, Derek
    Fredin, Ola
    Goodfellow, Bradley W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences. Lund University, Sweden.
    Harbor, Jonathan M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Purdue University, USA.
    Jansen, John D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. University of Potsdam, Germany.
    Olsen, Lars
    Caffee, Marc W.
    Fink, David
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Rosqvist, Gunhild C.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. University of Bergen, Norway.
    Strömberg, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Jansson, Krister N.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Deglaciation of Fennoscandia2016In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 147, no SI, 91-121 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To provide a new reconstruction of the deglaciation of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet, in the form of calendar-year time-slices, which are particularly useful for ice sheet modelling, we have compiled and synthesized published geomorphological data for eskers, ice-marginal formations, lineations, marginal meltwater channels, striae, ice-dammed lakes, and geochronological data from radiocarbon, varve, optically-stimulated luminescence, and cosmogenic nuclide dating. This is summarized as a deglaciation map of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet with isochrons marking every 1000 years between 22 and 13 cal kyr BP and every hundred years between 11.6 and final ice decay after 9.7 cal kyr BP. Deglaciation patterns vary across the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet domain, reflecting differences in climatic and geomorphic settings as well as ice sheet basal thermal conditions and terrestrial versus marine margins. For example, the ice sheet margin in the high-precipitation coastal setting of the western sector responded sensitively to climatic variations leaving a detailed record of prominent moraines and other ice-marginal deposits in many fjords and coastal valleys. Retreat rates across the southern sector differed between slow retreat of the terrestrial margin in western and southern Sweden and rapid retreat of the calving ice margin in the Baltic Basin. Our reconstruction is consistent with much of the published research. However, the synthesis of a large amount of existing and new data support refined reconstructions in some areas. For example, the LGM extent of the ice sheet in northwestern Russia was located far east and it occurred at a later time than the rest of the ice sheet, at around 17-15 cal kyr BP. We also propose a slightly different chronology of moraine formation over southern Sweden based on improved correlations of moraine segments using new LiDAR data and tying the timing of moraine formation to Greenland ice core cold stages. Retreat rates vary by as much as an order of magnitude in different sectors of the ice sheet, with the lowest rates on the high-elevation and maritime Norwegian margin. Retreat rates compared to the climatic information provided by the Greenland ice core record show a general correspondence between retreat rate and climatic forcing, although a close match between retreat rate and climate is unlikely because of other controls, such as topography and marine versus terrestrial margins. Overall, the time slice reconstructions of Fennoscandian Ice Sheet deglaciation from 22 to 9.7 cal kyr BP provide an important dataset for understanding the contexts that underpin spatial and temporal patterns in retreat of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet, and are an important resource for testing and refining ice sheet models.

  • 16.
    Wohlfarth, Barbara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Alexanderson, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Ampel, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Bennike, Ole
    Engels, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Johnsen, Timothy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Reimer, Paula
    Pilgrimstad revisited – multi-proxy reconstructions of Early/Middle Weichselian climate and environment at a key site in central Sweden2010In: Boreas, Vol. 40, 211-230 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The site Pilgrimstad in central Sweden has often been cited as a key locality for discussions of ice-free/ice-covered intervals during the Early and Middle Weichselian. Multi-proxy investigations of a recently excavated section at Pilgrimstad now provide a revised picture of the climatic and environmental development between similar to 80 and 36 ka ago. The combination of sedimentology, geochemistry, OSL and 14C dating, and macrofossil, siliceous microfossil and chironomid analyses shows: (i) a lower succession of glaciofluvial/fluvial, lacustrine and glaciolacustrine sediments; (ii) an upper lacustrine sediment sequence; and (iii) Last Glacial Maximum till cover. Microfossils in the upper lacustrine sediments are initially characteristic for oligo- to mesotrophic lakes, and macrofossils indicate arctic/sub-arctic environments and mean July temperatures > 8 degrees C. These conditions were, however, followed by a return to a low-nutrient lake and a cold and dry climate. The sequence contains several hiatuses, as shown by the often sharp contacts between individual units, which suggests that ice-free intervals alternated with possible ice advances during certain parts of the Early and Middle Weichselian.

1 - 16 of 16
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