Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 44 of 44
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1. Breen, R.
    et al.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Explaining Change in Social Fluidity: Educational Equalization and Educational Expansion in Twentieth-Century Sweden2007Inngår i: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 112, nr 6, s. 1775-1810Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 2. Breen, Richard
    et al.
    Mood, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Nuffield College, Oxford University, UK.
    How much scope for a mobility paradox? The relationship between social and income mobility in Sweden2016Inngår i: Sociological Science, ISSN 0132-1625, E-ISSN 2330-6696, Vol. 3, s. 39-60Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often pointed out that conclusions about intergenerational (parent–child) mobility can differ depending on whether we base them on studies of class or income. We analyze empirically the degree of overlap in income and social mobility; we demonstrate mathematically the nature of their relationship; and we show, using simulations, how intergenerational income correlations relate to relative social mobility rates. Analyzing Swedish longitudinal register data on the incomes and occupations of over 300,000 parent–child pairs, we find that social mobility accounts for up to 49 percent of the observed intergenerational income correlations. This figure is somewhat greater for a fine-graded micro-class classification than a five-class schema and somewhat greater for women than men. There is a positive relationship between intergenerational social fluidity and income correlations, but it is relatively weak. Our empirical results, and our simulations verify that the overlap between income mobility and social mobility leaves ample room for the two indicators to move in different directions over time or show diverse patterns across countries. We explain the circumstances in which income and social mobility will change together or co-vary positively and the circumstances in which they will diverge.

  • 3.
    Engzell, Per
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). University of Oxford, England .
    Estimating Social and Ethnic Inequality in School Surveys: biases from Child Misreporting and Parent Nonresponse2015Inngår i: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 31, nr 3, s. 312-325Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the biases that arise in estimates of social inequalities in children's cognitive ability test scores due to (i) children's misreporting of socio-economic origin and (ii) parents' nonresponse. Unlike most previous studies, we are able to draw on linked register data with high reliability and almost no missingness and thereby jointly consider the impact of measurement error and nonresponse. Using data on 14-year-olds (n = 18,716) from a new survey conducted in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden (Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Survey in Four European Countries), we find that child reports on parental occupation are well aligned with parents' reports in all countries, but reports on parental education less so. This leads to underestimation of socio-economic disparities when child reports of education are used, but not occupation. Selective nonresponse among parents turns out to be a real problem, resulting in similar underestimation. We also investigate conditional estimates of immigrant-non-immigrant disparities, which are surprisingly little affected by measurement error or nonresponse in socio-economic control variables. We conclude that school-based surveys on teenagers are well advised to include questions on parental occupation, while the costs for carrying out parental questionnaires may outweigh the gains.

  • 4.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Finns viljan att tillvarata begåvningsreserven?2010Inngår i: Kritisk utbildningstidskrift (KRUT), ISSN 0347-5409, Vol. 1-2, nr 137-138, s. 57-71Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5. Fleischmann, Fenella
    et al.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    van de Werfhorst, Herman G.
    Gender inequalities in the education of the second generation in Western countries2014Inngår i: Sociology of education, ISSN 0038-0407, E-ISSN 1939-8573, Vol. 87, nr 3, s. 143-170Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on comparative analyses from nine Western countries, we ask whether local-born children from a wide range of immigrant groups show patterns of female advantage in education that are similar to those prevalent in their host Western societies. We consider five outcomes throughout the educational career: test scores or grades at age 15, continuation after compulsory schooling, choice of academic track in upper-secondary education, completion of upper secondary, and completion of tertiary education. Despite great variation in gender gaps in education in immigrants’ origin countries (with advantages for males in many cases), we find that the female advantage in education observed among the majority population is usually present among second-generation immigrants. We interpret these findings in light of ideas about gender role socialization and immigrant selectivity.

  • 6. Gregg, Paul
    et al.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Oxford University, UK.
    Macmillan, Lindsey
    Mood, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    The Role of Education for Intergenerational Income Mobility: A comparison of the United States, Great Britain, and Sweden2017Inngår i: Social Forces, ISSN 0037-7732, E-ISSN 1534-7605, Vol. 96, nr 1, s. 121-151Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have found that intergenerational income persistence is relatively high in the United States and Britain, especially as compared to Nordic countries. We compare the association between family income and sons' earnings in the United States (National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979), Britain (British Cohort Study 1970), and Sweden (Population Register Data, 1965 cohort), and find that both income elasticities and rank-order correlations are highest in the United States, followed by Britain, with Sweden being clearly more equal. We ask whether differences in educational inequality and in return to qualifications can explain these cross-country differences. Surprisingly, we find that this is not the case, even though returns to education are higher in the United States. Instead, the low income mobility in the United States and Britain is almost entirely due to the part of the parent-son association that is not mediated by educational attainment. In the United States and especially Britain, parental income is far more important for earnings at a given level of education than in Sweden, a result that holds also when controlling for cognitive ability. This goes against widespread ideas of the United States as a country where the role of ascription is limited and meritocratic stratification prevails.

  • 7. Jackson, Michelle
    et al.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Why does educational inequality of opportunity vary accross countries?: primary and secondary effects in comparative perspective2013Inngår i: Determined to succeed?: performance versus choice in educational attainment / [ed] Jackson, Michelle Victoria, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 8. Jackson, Michelle
    et al.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Ethnic Inequality in Choice-driven Education Systems: A Longitudinal Study of Performance and Choice in England and Sweden2012Inngår i: Sociology of education, ISSN 0038-0407, E-ISSN 1939-8573, Vol. 85, nr 2, s. 158-178Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors ask whether choice-driven education systems, with comprehensive schools and mass education at the secondary and tertiary level, represented in this article by England and Sweden, provide educational opportunities for ethnic minorities. In studying educational attainment, the authors make a theoretical distinction between mechanisms connected with school performance on the one hand (primary effects) and educational choice, given performance, on the other (secondary effects). Using large national data sets and recently developed methods, they show that performance effects tend to depress the educational attainment of most, although not all, ethnic minorities, whereas choice effects increase the transition rates of these students. This pattern is repeated at the transition to university education. These results are true for many immigrant categories in both England and Sweden, although immigrant students are a heterogeneous group. Black Caribbean students in England and children of Turkish and South American descent in Sweden fare worst, while several Asian groups do extremely well. The authors conclude that it may be a generic feature of choice-driven school systems in Western societies to benefit non-European immigrants, and they discuss some possible explanations for this.

  • 9.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Child Well-Being and Intergenerational Inequality: Editorial2010Inngår i: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X (Print) 1874-8988 (Online), Vol. 3, nr 1, s. 1-10Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 10.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Nuffield College Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Ever-expanding university?: social and ethnic inequality in education2014Inngår i: University adaptation in difficult economic times / [ed] Paola Mattei, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, s. 157-170Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In many countries there have been massive changes toward support for the expansionist view, most recently during the 1990s and onwards, where politicians in England and Sweden have gone so far as to claim that at least half of a cohort should pursue tertiary level education. In fact, equality and expansion are intrinsically intertwined, but not because expansion leads to equality. Instead, what is argued here is that, if university education is to expand at the same time as academic standards are upheld, equalization is a necessary condition. It is the aim of this chapter to summarize recent sociological theory and empirical evidence on social and ethnic inequality in education in order to highlight the relation between equalization and expansion. In doing that, I will also discuss what potential institutional changes in the educational system have for the pursuit of educational expansion.

  • 11.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Gymnasiets yrkesutbildningar efter reformen - mer valvärda alternativ?2007Inngår i: Utbildningsvägen - vart leder den?, SNS förlag, Stockholm , 2007Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 12.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Immigration and Integration: Key Characteristics of Host Countries and Their Immigrants2018Inngår i: Growing Up in Diverse Societies: The Integration of the Children of Immigrants in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden / [ed] Frank Kalter, Jan O. Jonsson, Frank van Tubergen, Anthony F. Heath, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, s. 40-61Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 13.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Micro-Class Mobility. Social Reproduction in Four Countries2009Inngår i: American Journal of Sociology, ISSN 0002-9602, E-ISSN 1537-5390, Vol. 114, nr 4, s. 977-1036Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 14.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Opening up the University: Measures for equalizing access to higher education2011Inngår i: Öffnung der Hochschule. Chancengerechtigkeit, Diversität, Integration, s. 31-36Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 15.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Social skiktning och klass2007Inngår i: Social handling och sociala relationer, Natur och Kultur, Stockholm , 2007, s. 215-52Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 16.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Social skiktning och klass2007Inngår i: Social handling och sociala relationer, Stockholm: Natur och Kultur , 2007, s. 215-52Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 17.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    The Farther they Come, the Harder they Fall?: First and Second Generation Immigrants in the Swedish Labour Market2007Inngår i: Unequal Chances: Ethnic Minorities in Western Labour Markets, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2007, s. 451-505Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 18.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Bihagen, Erik
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Mood, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Fattigdomens förändring, utbredning och dynamik2010Inngår i: Social rapport 2010, Stockholm: Socialstyrelsen , 2010, s. 90-126Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 19.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Centrum för forskning om ojämlikhet i hälsa (CHESS).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Engzell Waldén, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Integration, etnisk mångfald och attityder bland högstadieelever: Resultat från enkätstudien YES! inom projektet CILS4EU2012Inngår i: Främlingsfienden inom oss: Bilagedel, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2012Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 20.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Sweden: Why Educational Expansion is Not Such a Great Strategy for Equality: Theory and Evidence2007Inngår i: Stratification in Higher Education: A Comparative Study, Stanford University Press , 2007, s. 113-139Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 21.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Grusky, David
    Dov’è l’occupazione nella mobilità occupazionale?: (title in English: Where is the occupation in occupational mobility?)2008Inngår i: Sociologia del lavoro, Vol. 112, s. 119-138Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 22.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Grusky, David B.
    Di Carlo, Matthew
    Pollak, Reinhard
    It's a Decent Bet That Our Children Will Become Professors Too2011Inngår i: The Inequality Reader: Contemporary and Foundational Readings in Race, Class, and Gender / [ed] Grusky, D.B., Szelényi, S., Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press , 2011, 2ndKapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 23.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Grusky, David B.
    Pollak, Reinhard
    Di Carlo, Matthew
    Mood, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Occupations and Social Mobility: Gradational, Big-Class, and Micro-Class Reproduction in Comparative Perspective2011Inngår i: Persistence, Privilege, and Parenting: The Comparative Study of Intergenerational Mobility / [ed] Timothy M Smeeding, Robert Erikson, and Markus Jäntti, New York: Russell Sage Foundation , 2011, s. 138-171Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 24.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Grusky, David
    Sato, Yoshimichi
    Miwa, Satoshi
    Di Carlo, Matthew
    Pollak, Reinhard
    Brinton, Mary C.
    Social Mobility in Japan: A New Approach to Modeling Trend in Mobility2008Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 25.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). University of Oxford; United Kingdom.
    Kalter, Frank
    van Tubergen, Frank
    Studying Minority and Majority Youth in Comparative Perspective2018Inngår i: Growing Up in Diverse Societies: The Integration of the Children of Immigrants in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden / [ed] Frank Kalter, Jan O. Jonsson, Frank van Tubergen, Anthony F. Heath, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, s. 1-39Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 26.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Mood, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Choice by Contrast in Swedish Schools: How Peers’ Achievement Affects Educational Choice2008Inngår i: Social Forces: International Journal of Social Research, Vol. 87, nr 2, s. 741-765Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We ask whether a social contrast mechanism depresses the educational aspirations of students with high-achieving peers. We study two entire cohorts of students in the final grade of the Swedish comprehensive school with matched information on social origin and achievements (160,417 students, 829 schools). Controlling for school fixed effects and observed characteristics of students and families, we find that the propensity to make a high-aspiring choice of upper-secondary school program is lower for students with high-achieving schoolmates, given own achievement. While theoretically interesting, the effect is small compared to that of own achievement: Moving an average student from an average school to a school that lies one standard deviation lower in achievement increases the probability of a high-aspiring choice by three percentage points.

  • 27.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Mood, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Mental well-being in boys and girls of immigrant background: The balance between vulnerability and resilience2018Inngår i: Growing Up in Diverse Societies: The Integration of the Children of Immigrants in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden / [ed] Frank Kalter, Jan O. Jonsson, Frank van Tubergen, Anthony F. Heath, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, s. 369-397Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 28.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Mood, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Sociala konsekvenser av ekonomisk utsatthet. Umgänge, stöd och deltagande2014Inngår i: Ojämlikhetens dimensioner: uppväxtvillkor, arbete och hälsa i Sverige / [ed] Marie Evertsson & Charlotta Magnusson, Stockholm: Liber, 2014, s. 311-326Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 29.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Mood, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Bihagen, Erik
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Poverty in Sweden 1991-2007. Change, dynamics, and intergenerational transmission of poverty during economic recession and growth2011Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary

    • Has poverty increased or decreased in Sweden during the last two decades? The answer to this question depends on the definition of poverty. In relative terms poverty has increased due to increasing income differences.

    • Between 5 and 11 per cent of the population ended up in absolute poverty between 1991 and 2007. The proportions were much higher for those living alone, for young adults, and for immigrants, particularly those newly arrived.

    • Half of the poor leave poverty already the year after entry. The group of poor therefore is composed to a large extent by those who are long-term poor. For those who have once been poor, the risk is high to return to poverty.

    • Poverty is strongly associated with economic recession and growth. When the macroeconomic conditions are favourable fewer become poor and the persistence in poverty decreases.

    • Long-term poverty, defined in absolute terms, has decreased but become more concentrated to those living alone and to immigrants. Among immigrants, persistence is higher than among those born in Sweden.

    • An individual’s incomes and risk of poverty are associated with the household incomes during childhood. Those who grow up poor have excess risks for ending up poor as adults. The probability of ending up as high-income earners is much higher for those who grew up under such advantaged conditions themselves as compared to others.

    • Intergenerational income mobility increased between 1995 and 2005, approximately, but whereas inequality of opportunity thus decreased the economic consequences of the income background grew.

  • 30.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). University of Oxford, England, UK.
    Mood, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institute for Future Studies, Sweden.
    Bihagen, Erik
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Poverty trends during two recessions and two recoveries: Lessons from Sweden 1991—20132016Inngår i: IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, E-ISSN 2193-9012, Vol. 5, artikkel-id 3Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We study cross-sectional and long-term poverty in Sweden over a period spanning two recessions, and discuss changes in the policy context. We find large increases in absolute poverty and deprivation during the 1990’s recession but much smaller increases in 2008-2010. While increases in non-employment contributed to increasing poverty in the 1990’s, the temporary poverty increase 2008-2010 was entirely due to growing poverty among non-employed. Relative poverty has increased with little variation across business cycles. Outflow from poverty and long-term poverty respond quickly to macro-economic recovery, but around one percent of the working-aged are quite resistant to such improvements.

  • 31.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Ethnic differences in early school-leaving: an international comparison.2014Inngår i: Unequal attainments: ethnic educational inequalities in ten Western countries / [ed] Anthony Heath and Yaël Brinbaum, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 32.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Weak Performance—Strong Determination: School Achievement and Educational Choice among Children of Immigrants in Sweden2011Inngår i: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 27, nr 4, s. 487-508Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We ask how the advantages and disadvantages in the educational careers of children of immigrants in Sweden are produced, making a theoretical distinction between mechanisms connected with school performance on one hand, and educational choice on the other. Using a new data set, covering six full cohorts of Swedish-born ninth-graders in 1998–2003 (N¼612,730), with matched school-Census information, we show that children of non-European immigrant origin are disadvantaged in their school performance but advantaged in their choice of academic upper secondary education. They have lower and more often incomplete grades, which force a sizeable proportion—10–20 per cent—into non-meritorious tracks or lead them to leave school. Given grades, children of non-European background make heterogeneous choices: many do not enrol in upper secondary education, but among those who do the propensity is high that they choose academic studies before vocational. In contrast, children of the ‘old’ (chiefly Nordic) labour immigrants are similar to the majority group in their equal preference for these two routes. A school system where choice plays a significant role appears to be advantageous for the often high-aspiring second-generation immigrant students, but greater efforts to reduce early achievement differences may still alleviate ethnic minority disadvantages.

  • 33.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Östberg, Viveca
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Centrum för forskning om ojämlikhet i hälsa (CHESS).
    Studying Young People's Level of Living: The Swedish Child-LNU2010Inngår i: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X, E-ISSN 1874-8988, Vol. 3, nr 1, s. 47-64Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a strategy for studying the level of living of young people based on survey information from children themselves, combined with information from parents and administrative records. In this way, children become the prime informants of their own conditions, at the same time as we get reliable information on their family context, such as the household economy and parental characteristics, from other sources. We base our over-arching theoretical idea on a definition of level of living in terms of command over resources in several areas of life; resources with which children can actively shape their own lives, according to age and maturity. The focus on scope of action leads us to prefer descriptive rather than evaluative indicators. We define empirical indicators along eight broad dimensions of the level of living of young people which we use in a survey of 10–18-year-olds, the Swedish Child-LNU (n = 1,304, response rate = 76,6%), connected to the Level-of-Living Survey, LNU2000, done on adults, i.e., the children’s parents. We report descriptive results showing that the overall level of living of young people in Sweden is very high, but that children to lone parents and immigrants lag behind on some indicators. A worry for the future is the relatively high incidence of poor psychological well-being and psychosomatic problems.

  • 34. Kalter, Frank
    et al.
    Jonsson, Jan O.Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).van Tubergen, FrankHeath, Anthony
    Growing Up in Diverse Societies: The Integration of the Children of Immigrants in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden2018Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 35.
    Mood, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Jan O., Jonsson
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden; Nuffield College, UK.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Centrum för forskning om ojämlikhet i hälsa (CHESS).
    The Mental Health Advantage of Immigrant-Background Youth: The Role of Family Factors2017Inngår i: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 79, nr 2, s. 419-436Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Children of immigrant background, despite problems with acculturation, poverty, and discrimination, have better mental health than children of native parents. We asked whether this is a result of immigrant families' characteristics such as family structure and relations. Using a new comparative study on the integration of immigrant-background youth conducted in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden (N= 18,716), particularly strong associations with mental health (internalizing and externalizing problems) were found for family structure, family cohesion, and parental warmth. Overall, half of the advantage in internalizing and externalizing problems among immigrant-background youth could be accounted for by our measures of family structure and family relations, with family cohesion being particularly important.

  • 36.
    Mood, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institutet för framtidsstudier, Sverige.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Oxfords universitet, England.
    Den ökande ensamheten i Sverige är en myt2018Inngår i: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, nr 8 augustiArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 37.
    Mood, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Ekonomisk utsatthet och välfärd bland barn och deras familjer 1968-2010: underlagsrapport till Barns och ungas hälsa, vård och omsorg 20132013Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 38.
    Mood, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden; Nuffield College, UK.
    The Social Consequences of Poverty: An Empirical Test on Longitudinal Data2016Inngår i: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 127, nr 2, s. 633-652Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Poverty is commonly defined as a lack of economic resources that has negative social consequences, but surprisingly little is known about the importance of economic hardship for social outcomes. This article offers an empirical investigation into this issue. We apply panel data methods on longitudinal data from the Swedish Level-of-Living Survey 2000 and 2010 (n = 3089) to study whether poverty affects four social outcomes-close social relations (social support), other social relations (friends and relatives), political participation, and activity in organizations. We also compare these effects across five different poverty indicators. Our main conclusion is that poverty in general has negative effects on social life. It has more harmful effects for relations with friends and relatives than for social support; and more for political participation than organizational activity. The poverty indicator that shows the greatest impact is material deprivation (lack of cash margin), while the most prevalent poverty indicators-absolute income poverty, and especially relative income poverty-appear to have the least effect on social outcomes.

  • 39.
    Mood, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institute for Future Studies (IFFS), Sweden.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institute for Future Studies (IFFS), Sweden; Oxford University, UK.
    Trends in child poverty in Sweden: Parental and child reports2016Inngår i: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X, E-ISSN 1874-8988, Vol. 9, nr 3, s. 825-854Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We use several family-based indicators of household poverty as well as child-reported economic resources and problems to unravel child poverty trends in Sweden. Our results show that absolute (bread-line) household income poverty, as well as economic deprivation, increased with the recession 1991–96, then reduced and has remained largely unchanged since 2006. Relative income poverty has however increased since the mid-1990s. When we measure child poverty by young people’s own reports, we find few trends between 2000 and 2011. The material conditions appear to have improved and relative poverty has changed very little if at all, contrasting the development of household relative poverty. This contradictory pattern may be a consequence of poor parents distributing relatively more of the household income to their children in times of economic duress, but future studies should scrutinze potentially delayed negative consequences as poor children are lagging behind their non-poor peers. Our methodological conclusion is that although parental and child reports are partly substitutable, they are also complementary, and the simultaneous reporting of different measures is crucial to get a full understanding of trends in child poverty.

  • 40.
    Mood, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institutet för framtidsstudier, Sverige.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Oxfords universitet, England.
    Utbyggd välfärd skapar inte ensamhet2018Inngår i: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, nr 13 augustiArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 41.
    Mood, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Bihagen, Erik
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Socioeconomic persistence across generations: cognitive and noncognitive processes2012Inngår i: From parents to children: the intergenerational transmission of advantage / [ed] John Ermisch, Markus Jäntti, Timothy M. Smeeding, New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2012, s. 53-84Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter analyses the role of cognitive ability, personality traits, and physical characteristics in transmission of socioeconomic status – measured as the intergenerational correlation between father’s and sons’ income and educational attainment, respectively. We find that the intergenerational educational correlation is mostly mediated by cognitive ability, while personality traits and physical characteristics are of little importance. The income correlation is mediated by cognitive ability too, but also by personality traits – and our analyses suggest that characteristics such as social maturity, emotional stability, and leadership capacity gain their importance directly in the labour market rather than through schooling. An interesting finding is that father’s income has a persistent and non-negligible effect on sons’ income despite very extensive controls for other parental characteristics (such as education, social class and occupation) and for other important mediators.

  • 42.
    Mood, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institute for Futures Studies (IFFS), Sweden.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institute for Futures Studies (IFFS), Sweden; Nuffield College, UK.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Centrum för forskning om ojämlikhet i hälsa (CHESS).
    Immigrant Integration and Youth Mental Health in Four European Countries2016Inngår i: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 32, nr 6, s. 716-729Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The mental health of children of immigrant background compared to their majority peers is an important indicator of integration. We analyse internalizing and externalizing problems in 14–15-year-olds from England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden (n = 18,716), using new comparative data (Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Survey in Four European Countries). Studying more than 30 different origin countries, we find that despite potential problems with acculturation and social stress, children of immigrants—particularly from geographically and culturally distant countries—report systematically fewer internalizing and externalizing problems than the majority population, thus supporting the ‘immigrant health paradox’ found in some studies. However, surprisingly, we do not find that this minority advantage changes with time in the destination country. Externalizing problems are most prevalent in our English sample, and overall Swedish adolescents show the least mental health problems. A plausible account of our results is that there is a positive selection of immigrants on some persistent and intergenerationally transferable characteristic that invokes resilience in children.

  • 43.
    Plenty, Stephanie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institute for Future Studies (IFFS), Sweden.
    Jan O., Jonsson
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Institute for Future Studies (IFFS), Sweden; Nuffield College, Oxford University, UK.
    Social Exclusion among Peers: The Role of Immigrant Status and Classroom Immigrant Density2017Inngår i: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 46, nr 6, s. 1275-1288Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing immigration and school ethnic segregation have raised concerns about the social integration of minority students. We examined the role of immigrant status in social exclusion and the moderating effect of classroom immigrant density among Swedish 14-15-year olds (n = 4795, 51 % females), extending conventional models of exclusion by studying multiple outcomes: victimization, isolation, and rejection. Students with immigrant backgrounds were rejected more than majority youth and first generation non-European immigrants were more isolated. Immigrants generally experienced more social exclusion in immigrant sparse than immigrant dense classrooms, and victimization increased with higher immigrant density for majority youth. The findings demonstrate that, in addition to victimization, subtle forms of exclusion may impede the social integration of immigrant youth but that time in the host country alleviates some risks for exclusion.

  • 44.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Ethnic Segregation and Educational Outcomes in Swedish Comprehensive Schools2007Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    We ask whether ethnic density in Swedish comprehensive schools affect teacher-assigned school grades in ninth grade (age 16). The data, based on two entire cohorts who graduated in 1998 and 1999 (188,000 pupils and 1,043 schools), link school information with Census data on social origin, and enable us to distinguish first- from second generation immigrants.

    Using multilevel analysis we find the proportion of first, but not the second, generation immigrant pupils in a school to depress grades in general, but particularly for (first generation) immigrant pupils. Passing a threshold of more than 40 percent immigrants reduces grades with around a fifth of a standard deviation, affecting fourteen percent of immigrant children. Our main results are robust to model specifications which address omitted variable bias both at individual- and school-level. One policy implication of our results is that desegregation policies which concentrated on the two per cent most segregated schools would probably improve school results and reduce ethnic inequality.

1 - 44 of 44
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf