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  • 1.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Goldscheider, Frances
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Attitudes to the gender division of labor and the transition to fatherhood: Are egalitarian men in Sweden more likely to remain childless?2016In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 269-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most European countries, including Sweden, have witnessed considerable postponement of first births over the past several decades, and societal gender equality has been mentioned among the central reasons for the delay in childbearing. Continued postponement of parenthood over the life course can result in final childlessness, i.e. the individual will reach the end of his/her reproductive period without having become a parent. As levels of final childlessness have been increasing in most European countries, studies of childlessness have become more common. However, most of these studies deal exclusively with women, and the theorizing regarding what leads to final childlessness, particularly among men, is clearly underdeveloped. In this paper we will contribute to this research area by investigating the long-term relationships between attitudes toward domestic gender equality and men's transition to parenthood in Sweden. Our dependent variable is a close approximation of final childlessness. We use Swedish panel survey data on attitudes to the gender division of labor among still childless young adults aged 22-30 in 1999, combined with register data on births in the period 1999-2012. The article shows that the initial delay in becoming fathers evidenced by more egalitarian men is not made up in the long term.

  • 2.
    Drefahl, Sven
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Kolk, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Dödlighet2017In: Demografi: Befolkningsperspektiv på samhället / [ed] Ann-Zofie Duvander, Jani Turunen, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, p. 67-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Turunen, JaniStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Demografi: Befolkningsperspektiv på samhället2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Jordens befolkning har de senaste 50 åren ökat med över fyra miljarder människor. Hur har det gått till? Är det för att vi lever längre eller för att vi skaffar fler barn? Är befolkningsökning  positivt eller negativt? Varför domineras vissa befolkningar av barn medan andra åldras snabbt – och vad blir följderna av detta?

    För att svara på dessa frågor krävs demografisk kunskap. Med den här boken vill vi ge läsaren ökad kunskap om världens befolkningsutveckling med fokus på Sverige. Vi vill ge förståelse för hur befolkningen påverkar samhällets utformning, men också om hur samhället kan påverka befolkningsutvecklingen.

    Boken beskriver befolkningsutvecklingen i ett historiskt perspektiv men har sitt huvudsakliga fokus på nutida samhällen. Kapitlen tar upp demografins mest centrala processer: barnafödande, dödlighet och migration men även befolkningsstruktur samt parbildning och separationer. Boken presenterar även grundläggande demografiska mått och metoder.

    Boken vänder sig till studenter inom främst samhällsvetenskap men även andra som är intresserade av att få en introduktion till demografi.

  • 4.
    Fransson, Emma
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Östberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Bergström, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Psychological complaints among children in joint physical custody and other family types: Considering parental factors2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 177-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Increasing proportions of Scandinavian children and children in other Western countries live in joint physical custody, moving between parents’ homes when parents live apart. Children and parents in non-intact families are at risk of worse mental health. The potential influence of parental ill-health on child well-being in the context of differing living arrangements has not been studied thoroughly. This study investigates the psychological complaints of children in joint physical custody in comparison to children in sole parental care and nuclear families, while controlling for socioeconomic differences and parental ill-health. Methods: Data were obtained from Statistics Sweden’s yearly Survey of Living Conditions 2007–2011 and child supplements with children 10–18 years, living in households of adult participants. Children in joint physical custody (n=391) were compared with children in sole parental care (n=654) and children in nuclear families (n=3,639), using a scale of psychological complaints as the outcome measure. Results: Multiple regression modelling showed that children in joint physical custody did not report higher levels of psychological complaints than those in nuclear families, while children in sole parental care reported elevated levels of complaints compared with those in joint physical custody. Adding socioeconomic variables and parental ill-health only marginally attenuated the coefficients for the living arrangement groups. Low parental education and parental worry/anxiety were however associated with higher levels of psychological complaints. Conclusions: Psychological complaints were lower among adolescents in joint physical custody than in adolescents in sole parental care. The difference was not explained by parental ill-health or socioeconomic variables.

  • 5. Ma, Li
    et al.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Rizzi, Ester
    Divorce Chinese Style2018In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 80, no 5, p. 1287-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated divorce during China's social and economic transformation period from 1970 to 2012. Specifically, the study examined the trend development of divorce and demonstrated how marriage formation type and individual socioeconomic characteristics were associated with the likelihood of divorce across time. Event-history analysis was applied to longitudinal data from the China Family Panel Studies (2010-2012 waves). The results showed a threefold increase in divorce from the pre-1990s to the 1990s. Surprisingly, the trend shifted to a plateau toward the 2000s. When cohabitation was in its rapidly diffusing stage in the 1990s, individuals who cohabited prior to marriage had a substantially higher likelihood of divorce. As cohabitation became increasingly common in the 2000s, its effect on divorce weakened. The role of socioeconomic characteristics in divorce also varied across time. This study enriches the knowledge of family dynamics in contemporary Chinese society.

  • 6.
    Malmberg, Bo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Wimark, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Axelsson, Linn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Invandringens effekter på Sveriges ekonomiska utveckling2016Report (Other academic)
  • 7. Ruppanner, Leah
    et al.
    Brandén, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Does Unequal Housework Lead to Divorce? Evidence from Sweden2018In: Sociology, ISSN 0038-0385, E-ISSN 1469-8684, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 75-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of couple-level data hinders direct exploration of how inconsistencies in couples’ housework reports structure their relationship quality. We address this limitation by applying Swedish data from the 2009 Young Adult Panel Study (N = 1057 couples) matched with Swedish register data (2009–2014) to extend equity theory by estimating mismatch in couples’ housework reports on relationship satisfaction and stability. We find women who report performing more housework are less likely to be satisfied with their relationships, and are more likely to consider breaking up. These unions are also more likely to dissolve. Using both partners’ housework reports, we document discrediting women’s housework contribution, or reporting she does less than she reports, is associated with lower relationship satisfaction. Women in these partnerships also consider breaking up, and the unions are more likely to dissolve. Our results identify the gendered impact of housework inequality on relationship stability.

  • 8.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Adolescent Educational Outcomes in Blended Families: Evidence from Swedish Register Data2014In: Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, ISSN 1050-2556, E-ISSN 1540-4811, Vol. 55, no 7, p. 568-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Swedish register data, this article examines the association between having experienced the birth of a younger half-sibling and two educational outcome measures among Swedish 9th graders from 1998 to 2007. The data set, with the full population of 9th graders (N = 874,812), enables us to differentiate between adolescents with maternal as well as paternal half-siblings. The results show that adolescents in postseparation families with half-siblings have lower overall grades and are less likely to be eligible for school continuation after 9th grade than those without half-siblings. The results point to interesting gender patterns both by the sex of the child and whether the half-sibling is maternal or paternal.

  • 9.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Adolescent Educational Outcomes in Blended Families: Evidence from Swedish Register Data 1998-2007Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Using data from Swedish population registers (n: 874,812) this paper examines the association between sibling structure and educational outcomes among Swedish 9th graders 1998 to 2007. The large dataset, with the full student population, enables us to differentiate between adolescents with older and younger maternal as well as paternal half-siblings. The results show that adolescents in post-separation families with half-siblings have lower overall grades and are less likely to be eligible for school continuation after 9th grade than those without half-siblings. The results point to interesting gender patterns both by the sex of the child as well as whether the half-sibling is maternal or paternal. 

  • 10.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Barn mår inte sämre av delat boende2013In: Jordemodern, ISSN 0021-7468, no 4, p. 22-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Entering a stepfamily: Children’s Experience of Family Reconstitution in Sweden 1970-20002011In: Zeitschrift für Familienforschung, ISSN 1437-2940, E-ISSN 2196-2154, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 154-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I use the Swedish Level of Living Survey data to study children’s experience of family reconstitution, or the first formation of stepfamily in Sweden 1970 to 2000. I set out to analyze relative risks for acquiring a stepparent for boys and girls of different ages and socioeconomic backgrounds, here measured as parent’s educational attainment. The results show no educational differences in the stepfamily formation process. There are however clear gender differences in the family reconstitution process where the likelihood of gaining a stepparent varies by the child’s gender. Other factors that have effect on the child’s likelihood of entering the first stepfamily are the time lived with a single parent as well as the child’s age in interaction with the child’s sex. Although there are no educational differentials in stepfamily formation, one needs to account for the social gradient in the processes leading to children being in the risk pool. Particularly children of higher educated parents have a significantly lower risk of being born out of union or experiencing a parental union dissolution and thus being exposed to the risk of entering a stepfamily.

  • 12.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Entering a stepfamily: Family reconstitution in Sweden 1970-2000.2010In: Is  Family Alive?: Changing Social relations through Sex, Politics and Communication / [ed] Asato, Wako & Wataru Kusaka, Kyoto, Japan: Kyoto University Global COE Program , 2010, p. 305-313Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Family structure, gender, and adolescent emotional well-being2013In: Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, ISSN 1050-2556, E-ISSN 1540-4811, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 476-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on gender differences in emotional well-beingof adolescents in five different family settings. It analyzestwo main mediators—economic deprivation and parental socialization—and is based on unusually rich survey data combiningparental and child reports as well as information from administrativeregisters. The results show lower well-being of childrenin single-mother families and stepfamilies. These associations aremainly mediated through parental socialization rather than economicdeprivation, except for girls in their early to midteens livingwith a single mother. Different patterns of lower well-being levelsfor boys and girls in different family settings are found.

  • 14.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Shared Physical Custody and Children’s Experience of Stress2017In: Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, ISSN 1050-2556, E-ISSN 1540-4811, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 371-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies shared physical custody in Sweden, the country in the world where the phenomenon is most prevalent. We ask whether children in shared physical custody settings are more likely to report high levels of stress compared to children living in sole custody. The analysis is based on data with combined information from parents, children, and administrative registers. The models are controlled control for interparental as well as parent–child relationship quality and parents’ income. The results show that children sharing residence equally have lower likelihood of experiencing high levels of stress. The results can be interpreted as evidence for a positive effect of continuing everyday-like parental relationships after a family dissolution.

  • 15.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Stepfamily Dynamics in Sweden: Essays on family structure and children’s well-being2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates different aspects of family structure and children’s well-being in Sweden. Applying a child perspective, it analyzes children’s likelihood of stepfamily entry, their emotional well-being in different family forms and educational outcomes in families with complex sibling structures. Analyses are performed using data from nationally representative surveys of both parents and children as well as from administrative registers.

    The results do not show any socioeconomic differences in the process of family reconstitution, although children of parents with low educational attainment are more likely to be in the risk pool for stepfamily formation. There are however differences by gender, with girls having higher likelihood of stepfamily entry than boys, especially in the younger ages. Children are also more likely to experience a stepfamily formation on the paternal side, thus gaining a stepmother. Gender differences can also be found in the association between family type and emotional as well as educational well-being, with girls showing slightly more adverse outcomes than boys. Children of both sexes do however show lower well-being and school outcomes in post-separation family types than in original two-parent families.

    Like previous international stepfamily literature the results show that Swedish children in stepfamilies and blended families experience adverse emotional and educational outcomes but that the differences are generally small. The main contrast to previous, mostly American, studies are the lack of socioeconomic differences in stepfamily formation and that adverse emotional outcomes in single parent families as well as stepfamilies seem to be mainly explained by differences in parenting and the parent-child relationship rather than economic deprivation.

  • 16.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Understanding families – a global introduction Linda McKie and Samantha Callan. Sage Publications, London, 2012. No. of pages: xvii + 246. Price £24.99 (paperback). ISBN 978 1 84787 932 5:  2013In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 648-650Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Åldersstruktur som grund för konflikt: En demografisk studie av Kosovo2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 18.
    Turunen, Jani
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Fransson, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Bergström, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Self-esteem in children in joint physical custody and other living arrangements2017In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 149, p. 106-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Parental support has been shown to be important for children's self-esteem, which in turn is related to later important life outcomes. Today, an increasing number of children in the Western world spend time in both the parents' respective households after a separation. Children who live with both parents report more parental support than children who live only with one parent after a divorce. We took the opportunity of the commonness of children sharing their time between their parents' homes in Sweden to investigate children's self-esteem in relation to family type. Study design and methods: With nationally representative survey data (ULF) collected from both parents and children, we analyze differences in children's self-esteem among 4823 10-18 year olds in nuclear families, joint physical custody and those living mostly or only with one parent after a separation using ordinary least squares regression, adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Results: We found no significant difference in self-esteem between children who lived equally much with both parents, mostly with one parent and those in nuclear families, whereas children in single care showed lower self-esteem compared with children in the other living arrangements. The difference was not explained by socioeconomic factors. Conclusion: The self-esteem of children who share their time between their parent's respective homes after a separation does not deviate from that in their peers in nuclear families. Instead, those in single care reported lower self-esteem than those in the other living arrangements. These differences were not explained by socioeconomic factors. Longitudinal studies are needed to establish pre- and post-separation family characteristics that influence self-esteem and well-being in young people.

1 - 18 of 18
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