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  • 1.
    Eliasson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Human-Computer Interaction for Mobility and Learning2012In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning 2012 / [ed] Marcus Specht, Mike Sharples, Jari Multisilta, 2012, p. 332-335Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contextual learning activities supported by mobile devices are designed to include some kind of interaction with the physical environment. However, students may place the mobile devices in the foreground of interaction rather than interacting with the physical environment. We understand this as a problem of human-computer interaction, or more specifically of human-device interaction. This leads to the research question: How do we design for contextual learning supported by mobile devices? We approach this question from a design-based research perspective, where we design and evaluate contextual mobile learning activities together with teachers and students in four iterations. The contributions of this thesis are (1) a review of contextual mobile learning research, (2) a conceptualisation of contextual mobile learning from the perspective of human-device interaction, and (3) a model of human-device interaction that can be used in designing contextual mobile learning activities.

  • 2.
    Eliasson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tools for Designing Mobile Interaction with the Physical Environment in Outdoor Lessons2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile technologies are increasingly being used to support students in outdoor learning activities. For instance, in a growing number of research projects, smartphones and positioning technologies are being used to support students in exploring the natural environment. However, previous research has identified challenges with the introduction of mobile technology into outdoor lessons. One fundamental challenge is that interaction with mobile technology in outdoor lessons may distract students from interacting with the physical environment. In this thesis this challenge is approached from the perspective of human-computer interaction, guided by the following research question: How can we design, evaluate, and reflect on mobile technology for interacting with the physical environment in outdoor lessons? The thesis presents four design cases on outdoor geometry and biology lessons, which act as probes for developing conceptual design tools. The design cases were developed through a concept-driven design approach and evaluated on field tests with primary school students. Future workshop and Interaction analysis were the main methods used. The results of the field tests suggest that mobile technology needs to be designed to orientate students in their interaction with the physical environment. In line with the concept-driven design approach, the thesis proposes three design tools. The design tools proposed are: Design guidelines that are specific enough for guiding the design of mobile technology for outdoor lessons, a Design model for designing and evaluating mobile technology for outdoor lessons, and Design concepts for reflecting on the placement of mobile technology in outdoor lessons. The design tools are proposed as tools for researchers and designers to take the challenge of distraction into account in designing mobile technology for outdoor lessons.

  • 3.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mobile Devices as Support Rather than Distraction for Mobile Learners: Evaluating Guidelines for Design2011In: International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, ISSN 1941-8647, E-ISSN 1941-8655, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article questions the design of mobile learning activities that lead students to spend time focusing on the mobile devices at the expense of interacting with other students or exploring the environment. This problem is approached from an interaction design perspective, designing and analysing geometry-learning activities. The authors present six guidelines for designing mobile learning activities, where mobile devices support rather than distract students from contents and contexts relevant to the learning goals. The guidelines are developed through video analysis of groups of middle school students doing learning activities outdoors and evaluated using the task model. The guidelines suggest that students (1) assume roles based on a different functionality of each device, (2) use devices as contextual tools, that the activities, (3) include physical interaction with the environment, (4) let teachers assume roles, (5) encourage face-to-face communication, and (6) introduce students to the mobile devices.

  • 4.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Six ways of interacting with mobile devices in mobile inquiry-based learning2012In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference Mobile Learning 2012 / [ed] Inmaculada Arnedillo Sánchez and Pedro Isaías, 2012, p. 67-74Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We design a mobile learning activity with the aim of supporting inquiry-based learning and analyze it to understand how students interact with mobile devices. For analysis we use a model of contextual human-technology interaction, which is an expansion of an older model by Buxton (1995). Our research question is: How can student interaction in a mobile learning activity be described in the model of contextual human-technology interaction? We approach this question by analyzing an eight minute long video clip of a group of three students using mobile devices for calculating the distribution of trees in a forest area. We categorize the results in six different ways of interacting with technology according to the model. The analysis shows how the model of contextual human-technology interaction can be used for describing placement of technology in mobile learning activities when students are mobile in and between contexts relevant for their learning goals.

  • 5.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Evaluating Interaction with Mobile Devices in Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning2012In: WMUTE '12 Proceedings of the 2012 IEEE Seventh International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education, Washington, DC, USA: IEEE Computer Society, 2012, p. 92-96Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We evaluate to what extent students are interacting with mobile devices in one of four ways intended in the design of a mobile learning activity. Video data from one class of fifth grade students were analyzed using a model of four different types of interaction. The evaluation shows that the students interacted with the devices in the ways intended in design 64% of the time. The contribution is an approach for translating learning goals to interaction design goals in mobile learning research. We conclude that this approach can be of value in designing and evaluating interaction with mobile devices for an entire mobile learning activity.

  • 6.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Using smartphones and QR codes for supporting students in exploring tree species2013In: Scaling up Learning for Sustained Impact: 8th European Conference, on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL 2013, Paphos, Cyprus, September 17-21, 2013. Proceedings / [ed] Davinia Hernández-Leo, Tobias Ley, Ralf Klamma, Andreas Harrer, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 436-441Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smartphones are increasingly being used on field trips to support students in exploring the natural world. In this paper we present a design and analysis of an inquiry-based learning field trip for primary school students. One problem for design is how to make use of smartphones to support, rather than distract, students in interacting with the physical environment. We approach this problem by comparing two alternative designs, where students use smartphones for identifying tree species either by using an identification instrument or by reading a text description. The results show that students made use of the instrument for identification, QR codes, for identifying tree species and made use of the text descriptions for searching for tree species. In this sense, QR codes, connecting contextual information on smartphones to the physical environment, work as a learning tool that may be used for orienting students in their interaction with the physical environment.

  • 7.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Design Heuristics for Balancing Visual Focus on Devices in Formal Mobile Learning Activities2010In:  , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Design Guidelines for Location-Based and Contextual Learning Supported by Mobile Devices2012In: International Journal of Handheld Computing Research, ISSN 1947-9158, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 26-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In location-based and contextual mobile learning, students are continually mobile in the virtual, social, and physical environment. A common problem in this view of mobile learning is that students spend time focusing on the mobile devices at the expense of interacting with other students or exploring the physical environment. The authors approach this problem from an interaction design perspective, where they design and analyse geometry-learning activities in two iterations. Based on video data from groups of students participating in the learning activities, the authors analyse when mobile devices are in the foreground and background of their interaction. The authors present six guidelines for designing location-based and contextual mobile learning activities, where mobile devices support rather than distract students from contents and contexts relevant to the learning goals. Finally, the guidelines are evaluated using a model of interaction, which represents mobile device interaction as one of four different modes of human interaction with technology.

  • 9.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Design-Oriented Research or Research-Oriented Design in Mobile Learning?2010In: Norditel 2010 Book of abstracts, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Design research in mobile learning is challenging. In this position paper, we suggest that the dichotomy between design-oriented research and research-oriented design can help explicate the role of different design activities in mobile learning research.

  • 10.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Get the bees away from the hive: Balancing visual focus on devices in mobile learning2010In: IADIS International Conference Mobile Learning 2010, Porto, Portugal, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11. Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Bergström, Peter
    Eliasson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Lindberg, J. Ola
    Bridging the Distance from Research to Practice: Designing for Technology Enhanced Learning2012In: NGL 2012 Next Generation Learning Conference: Conference Proceedings, Dalarna University , 2012, p. 1-9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A grand challenge for educational research is to remove its weak link to practice. One of the strategies to confront these challenges can be through the use of Design-Based Research (DBR). A DBR approach includes working iterations of design, implementation and evaluation in real world learning contexts, making it especially suitable for research in Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL). This paper describes and contextualizes a workshop that points out the need to examine different design approaches and digital technology tools to explore TEL in educational practices. Since the goal of the workshop is to use multidiscipline perspectives of education and didactics (ED), computer science (CS), interaction design (ID), to show the complexity for supporting next generation learning, these perspectives will in the paper be described and put in relation to each other. What research questions within and in between the three perspectives should be included in a DBRapproach in order to inform and facilitate TELpractices. In the end, of the paper a multidisciplinary DBR-approach allowing a more holistic understanding of educational practices usin g TEL will be argued for.

  • 12. Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Eliasson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lessons from Designing Geometry Learning Activities that Combine Mobile and 3D Tools2010In: IEEE WMUTE (International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education), 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 12 of 12
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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