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  • 1. Lu, Ya-Ke
    et al.
    Qiao, Ya-Mei
    Liang, Xiao
    Yao, Wu
    Yan, Zhen
    Wang, Hui-Xin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Zhengzhou University, China.
    Pei, Jin-Jing
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Reciprocal relationship between psychosocial work stress and quality of life: the role of gender and education from the longitudinal study of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 6, article id e027051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate the reciprocal relationship between psychosocial work stress and quality of life (QoL) and to examine whether the relationship can be moderated by gender or education. Design Longitudinal, population-based study. Setting The Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Participants The study population was derived from the SHARE, and there were 2006 participants with good QoL at baseline, 1109 with high job control and 1072 with high job reward, respectively, who were followed up for 2 years to detect incidence of poor QoL, low job control and low job reward. Main outcome measures Logistic regression models were employed to explore the reciprocal relationship between psychological work stress and QoL. Stratification analyses by gender and education were performed. Results Participants with low reward (OR= 1.53, 95% CI 1.26 to 1.88) and low control (OR= 1.40, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.71) at baseline were at higher risk of poor QoL over the 2-year follow-up. The combination of low reward and low control further increased the risk (OR= 1.90, 95% CI 1.46 to 2.48). Stratified analyses revealed that these associations were more pronounced among those who had high levels of education. Further, individuals with poor QoL were at significantly higher risk of having low reward (OR= 2.14, 95% CI 1.55 to 2.96) but not low control (OR= 1.33, 95% CI0.98 to 1.79) at the 2-year follow-up, especially among those who had medium levels of education. No gender differences were found. Conclusions There is a reciprocal relationship between psychological work stress and poor QoL. Education may play an important role in the relationship.

  • 2. Qiao, Ya-Mei
    et al.
    Lu, Ya-Ke
    Yan, Zhen
    Yao, Wu
    Pei, Jin-Jing
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Wang, Hui-Xin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Zhengzhou University, China.
    Reciprocal associations between job strain and depression: A 2-year follow-up study from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe2019In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 9, article id e01381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A growing number of people suffered from depression. This study examined the depression prevalence in workers across 10 European countries plus Israel and the reciprocal associations between job strain and depression.

    Methods: The study population consisted of 7,879 workers aged 50-63 years at baseline (2004) from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Job demands (physical or psychosocial) and job control variables were derived from the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). Two 4-category job strains (physical and psychosocial) were obtained based on the cross-tabulation of these dichotomized demands and control variables. There were 4,284 depression-free, 3,259 high physical strain-free and 3,195 high psychosocial strain-free participants at baseline who were followed up for 2 years to detect incident depression, high physical job strain, or high psychosocial strain, respectively. The reciprocal associations between job strain and depression were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression and multivariate multilevel logistic regression adjusting for potential confounders.

    Results: The prevalence of depression varied from the lowest 12.5% in Germany to the highest 27.2% in France. Compared to individuals with low strain, a significantly higher risk of depression were found in individuals with high physical strain (OR = 1.39) and high psychosocial strain (OR = 1.55), after adjusting for potential confounders. Depression at baseline was not significantly associated with subsequent high job strain. Similar results were observed from multilevel models that took into consideration of the potential country-level influences.

    Conclusions: The prevalence of depression varies across countries in Europe. Avoiding high job strain may be an effective preventive strategy to prevent depression epidemic.

  • 3. Zhuo, Lai-Bao
    et al.
    Yao, Wu
    Yan, Zhen
    Giron, Maria S. T.
    Pei, Jing-Jing
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Wang, Hui-Xin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Zhengzhou University, China.
    Impact of effort reward imbalance at work on suicidal ideation in ten European countries: The role of depressive symptoms2020In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 260, p. 214-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Evidence of the association between effort reward imbalance (ERI) and suicidal ideation is sparse. This study examined the influence of ERI at work on suicidal ideation and the mediating effect of depressive symptoms. Methods: There were 4963 workers aged 50 + without suicidal ideation at baseline in the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe, these workers were followed-up for 8-years to detect incident suicidal ideation. ERI was measured by a short ERI questionnaire. Suicidal ideation was evaluated by one item derived from the 12-item Europe-depression scale, and depressive symptoms were assessed by the remaining 11 items in the scale. Cox models were employed to explore the relationship adjusting for potential confounders. Mediation analysis was used to test the mediating effect of depressive symptoms. Results: A significantly higher incidence of suicidal ideation was related with high effort (HR = 1.51) and low reward (HR = 1.42), respectively. A high effort-low reward imbalance was associated with even higher risk of suicidal ideation (HR = 1.96) as compared to low effort-high reward combination. The association was varied by gender, region, education and household income. Depressive symptoms mediated a modest proportion (natural indirect effect 14.4%) of the total association between ERI and suicidal ideation. Limitation: Suicidal ideation definition based on self-administered questionnaires which could lead to false negatives. And some unmeasured confounders might have biased the results. Conclusions: Efforts in promoting balanced effort-reward at work may reduce suicidal ideation among working population aged 50+. Avoiding depressive symptoms may further enhance such efforts.

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