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  • 1.
    Jaramillo, Fernando
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Desormeaux, Amanda
    Hedlund, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Jawitz, James W.
    Clerici, Nicola
    Piemontese, Luigi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Alexandra Rodríguez-Rodriguez, Jenny
    Adolfo Anaya, Jesús
    Blanco-Libreros, Juan F.
    Borja, Sonia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Celi, Jorge
    Chalov, Sergey
    Chun, Kwok Pan
    Cresso, Matilda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Dessu, Shimelis Behailu
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    Downing, Andrea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Espinosa, Luisa
    Ghajarnia, Navid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Girard, Pierre
    Gutiérrez, Álvaro G.
    Hansen, Amy
    Hu, Tengfei
    Jarsjö, Jerker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Kalantary, Zahra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Labbaci, Adnane
    Licero-Villanueva, Lucia
    Livsey, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Machotka, Ewa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies.
    McCurley, Kathryn
    Palomino-Ángel, Sebastián
    Pietron, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Price, René
    Ramchunder, Sorain J.
    Ricaurte-Villota, Constanza
    Ricaurte, Luisa Fernanda
    Dahir, Lula
    Rodríguez, Erasmo
    Salgado, Jorge
    Sannel, A. Britta K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Carolina Santos, Ana
    Seifollahi-Aghmiuni, Samaneh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Sun, Lian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Beijing Normal University, China.
    Thorslund, Josefin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Vigouroux, Guillaume
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Wang-Erlandsson, Lan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Xu, Diandian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Hohai University, China.
    Zamora, David
    Ziegler, Alan D.
    Åhlén, Imenne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Priorities and Interactions of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with Focus on Wetlands2019In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wetlands are often vital physical and social components of a country's natural capital, as well as providers of ecosystem services to local and national communities. We performed a network analysis to prioritize Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets for sustainable development in iconic wetlands and wetlandscapes around the world. The analysis was based on the information and perceptions on 45 wetlandscapes worldwide by 49 wetland researchers of the Global Wetland Ecohydrological Network (GWEN). We identified three 2030 Agenda targets of high priority across the wetlandscapes needed to achieve sustainable development: Target 6.3-Improve water quality; 2.4-Sustainable food production; and 12.2-Sustainable management of resources. Moreover, we found specific feedback mechanisms and synergies between SDG targets in the context of wetlands. The most consistent reinforcing interactions were the influence of Target 12.2 on 8.4-Efficient resource consumption; and that of Target 6.3 on 12.2. The wetlandscapes could be differentiated in four bundles of distinctive priority SDG-targets: Basic human needs, Sustainable tourism, Environmental impact in urban wetlands, and Improving and conserving environment. In general, we find that the SDG groups, targets, and interactions stress that maintaining good water quality and a wise use of wetlandscapes are vital to attaining sustainable development within these sensitive ecosystems.

  • 2. Jiménez, Alejandro
    et al.
    Livsey, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Stockholm International Water Institute, Sweden.
    Åhlén, Imenne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Stockholm International Water Institute, Sweden.
    Scharp, Cecilia
    Takane, Marina
    Global Assessment of Accountability in Water and Sanitation Services Using GLAAS Data2018In: Water Alternatives, ISSN 1965-0175, E-ISSN 1965-0175, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 238-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Global Analysis and Assessment of Sanitation and Drinking-Water (GLAAS) is one of UN-Water's regular reports. Its focuses include aspects of investment and the enabling environment for the delivery of water, sanitation and hygiene services. Accountability refers to the mechanisms through which duty bearers, elected officials and service providers report to rights holders and other stakeholders within the service delivery framework. Accountability contributes to good sector performance and the overall sustainability of services. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of accountability in the drinking-water and sanitation sector globally, based on the available data from the GLAAS survey of 2014. To achieve this, accountability was defined from a human rights perspective, and particularised for water and sanitation. Next the quantitative and open-ended questions from the GLAAS survey that related to this definition were analysed for all 94 responding countries. Comparisons were drawn between water and sanitation services in urban and rural settings, and regional trends were identified. The results show higher levels of accountability for water than sanitation services, and limited information on wastewater. Potential means to strengthen accountability in water and sanitation globally are seen to include improving access to information on the services provided, enacting participation policies and increasing the capacity of regulatory institutions. Particular attention should be paid to rural services. The GLAAS survey could be modified for a better understanding of the accountability mechanisms for WASH service provision.

  • 3.
    Livsey, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Katterer, Thomas
    Vico, Giulia
    Lyon, Steve W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. The Nature Conservancy, USA..
    Lindborg, Regina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Scaini, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Da, Chau Thi
    Manzoni, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Do alternative irrigation strategies for rice cultivation decrease water footprints at the cost of long-term soil health?2019In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 14, no 7, article id 074011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The availability of water is a growing concern for flooded rice production. As such, several water-saving irrigation practices have been developed to reduce water requirements. Alternate wetting and drying and mid-season drainage have been shown to potentially reduce water requirements while maintaining rice yields when compared to continuous flooding. With the removal of permanently anaerobic conditions during the growing season, water-saving irrigation can also reduce CO2 equivalent (CO2eq) emissions, helping reduce the impact of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, the long-term impact of water-saving irrigation on soil organic carbon (SOC)-used here as an indicator of soil health and fertility-has not been explored. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of common water-saving irrigation practices (alternate wetting and drying and mid-season drainage) on (i) SOC, and (ii) GHG emissions. Despite an extensive literature search, only 12 studies were found containing data to constrain the soil C balance in both continuous flooding and water-saving irrigation plots, highlighting the still limited understanding of long-term impacts of water-saving irrigation on soil health and GHG emissions. Water-saving irrigation was found to reduce emissions of CH4 by 52.3% and increased those of CO2 by 44.8%. CO2eq emissions were thereby reduced by 18.6% but the soil-to-atmosphere carbon (C) flux increased by 25% when compared to continuous flooding. Water-saving irrigation was also found to have a negative effect on both SOC-reducing concentrations by 5.2%-and soil organic nitrogen-potentially depleting stocks by more than 100 kgN/ha per year. While negative effects of water-saving irrigation on rice yield may not be visible in short-term experiments, care should be taken when assessing the long-term sustainability of these irrigation practices because they can decrease soil fertility. Strategies need to be developed for assessing the more long-term effects of these irrigation practices by considering trade-offs between water savings and other ecosystem services.

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