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  • 1.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Olsson, JanStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Media, popular culture, and the American century2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1941, media mogul Henry R. Luce exulted, “American jazz, Hollywood movies, American slang, American machines and patented products are in fact the only things that every community in the world, from Zanzibar to Hamburg, recognizes in common.” It is as true today as it was then. From the early days of Hollywood, an insatiable demand for U.S. cultural products—in advertising, fashion, film, popular music, television, and much else—has had a profound and continuing impact across the globe. Media, Popular Culture, and the American Century explores a diverse range of Americana, where the borders between the real and the imaginary, dream and dystopia, America and the world, blur and disappear. Essays move from configurations of U.S. culture in the early 1900s to the age of Google and digital music.

  • 2.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Mediated America: Americana as Hollywoodiana2010In: Media, popular culture, and the American century / [ed] Kingsley Bolton and Jan Olsson, London: John Libbey , 2010, p. 7-33Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Galili, DoronStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.Olsson, JanStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.Robert, Valentine
    Corporeality in Early Cinema: Viscera, Skin, and Physical Form2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporeality in Early Cinema inspires a heightened awareness of the ways in which early film culture, and screen praxes overall are inherently embodied. Contributors argue that on- and offscreen (and in affiliated media and technological constellations), the body consists of flesh and nerves and is not just an abstract spectator or statistical audience entity.

    Audience responses from arousal to disgust, from identification to detachment, offer us a means to understand what spectators have always taken away from their cinematic experience. Through theoretical approaches and case studies, scholars offer a variety of models for stimulating historical research on corporeality and cinema by exploring the matrix of screened bodies, machine-made scaffolding, and their connections to the physical bodies in front of the screen.

  • 4.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    “A Remarkably Versatile Dane”: Authorship, Style, and Trickality in Benjamin Christensen's Blind Justice2006In: North-West Passage, Vol. 3, no -, p. 9-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Alfred Hitchcock, théoricien de la télévision2011In: Télévision: le moment expérimental / [ed] Gilles Delavaud & Denis Maréchal, Rennes: Éditions Apogée , 2011, p. 536-548Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    ‘Asta’s ink: The Stockholm letters2012In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 5-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article offers a condensed account of Asta Nielsen's interaction with the Swedish National Censorship Board in 1911 after the banning of her film In dem großen Augenblick/The Great Moment for screening in Sweden. Her strategy, publishing open letters and inviting representatives from the press to non-public screenings, set the standard for other film companies dissatisfied with the slew of bans issued by the Board. A Nielsen letter to young movie fans, published in facsimile in a Swedish fan magazine in 1920, is translated to illustrate a different type of press interaction a decade later.

  • 7.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    “ ‘Dear Miss Gagner!’ – A Star and Her Methods,”2008In: Stellar Encounters: Stardom in Popular European Cinema, John Libbey Publishing, London , 2008, p. 217-229Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Exhibition Practices in Transition: Spectators, Audiences, and Projectors2018In: Technology and Film Scholarship: Experience, Study Theory / [ed] Santiago Hidalgo, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2018, p. 51-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Feeding Gossip: Alfred Hitchcock's Marketing Model: in 2nd Annual International Conference on Journalism & Mass Communications, Proceedings2013Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Filmaffärer: sicksackande anteckningar kring några Frank Heller-adaptioner2014In: Frank Heller och filmen / [ed] Göran Wessberg, Lund: Pelotard Press , 2014, p. 41-58Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    "Filmvisning på utrygg grunn – tilfellet Arthur S. Hyman"2009In: Veier Tilbake. Filmhistoriske perspektiver, Høyskoleforlaget, Kristiansand , 2009, p. 182–201-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Framing Silent Calls: Coming to Cinematographic Terms with Telephony2004In: Allegories of Communication. Intermedial Concerns from Cinema to the Digital, Rome: John Libbey , 2004, p. 157-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Hitchcock à la Carte2015Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alfred Hitchcock: cultural icon, master film director, storyteller, television host, foodie. And as Jan Olsson argues in Hitchcock à la Carte, he was also an expert marketer who built his personal brand around his rotund figure and well-documented table indulgencies. Focusing on Hitchcock's television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955-1962) and the The Alfred Hitchcock Hour (1962-1965), Olsson asserts that the success of Hitchcock's media empire depended on his deft manipulation of bodies and the food that sustained them. Hitchcock's strategies included frequently playing up his own girth, hiring body doubles, making numerous cameos, and using food—such as a frozen leg of lamb—to deliver scores of characters to their deaths. Constructing his brand enabled Hitchcock to maintain creative control, blend himself with his genre, and make himself the multi-million-dollar franchise's principal star. Olsson shows how Hitchcock's media brand management was a unique performance model that he used to mark his creative oeuvre as strictly his own.

  • 14.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Hitchcock à la Carte: Menus, Marketing and the Macabre2007In: Casting a Shadow: Creating the Alfred Hitchcock Film, Evanston: Northwestern University Press , 2007, p. 62-77; 81Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    "Hjalmar och Stina i tecknet av Dollar2008In: Förklädnader : jubileumskväll fredagen den 19 september 2008, i Börssalen, Svenska Akademien / Hjalmar Bergman samfundet, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Impeccable Characters—and The Politics of Stardom2017In: Quarterly Review of Film and Video, ISSN 1050-9208, E-ISSN 1543-5326, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 485-508Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Introduction: Jan Olsson and Kingsley Bolton, "Mediated America: Americana as Hollywoodiana"2010In: Media, Popular Culture, and the American Century / [ed] Kingsley Bolton och Jan Olsson, Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket , 2010, p. 7-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    "Italian Marionettes Meet Cinematic Modernity"2010In: Media, Popular Culture, and the American Century / [ed] Kingsley Bolton och Jan Olsson, Stockholm/London: Kungliga biblioteket/John Libbey Publishing , 2010, p. 35-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Klostret i Sendomir2011In: Le Giornate del Cinema Muro, 2011 / [ed] La Cineteca del Friuli, Pordenone: Le Giornate del Cinema Muto , 2011, p. 131-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    "Lek"2008In: Film och andra rörliga bilder - en introduktion, Raster Förlag, Stockholm , 2008, p. 88-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Les Appels Téléphoniques dans le Champ de Cinéma Muet2019In: Loin des Yeux... Le Cinéma: De la téléphonie à Internet: Imaginaires Médiatiques des Télécommunications et de la Surveillance / [ed] Alain Boillat, Laurent Guido, Lausanne: Editions L'Age d'Homme , 2019, p. 193-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Los Angeles Before Hollywood: Journalism and American Film Culture, 1905–19152009Book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Modernity Stops at Nothing: The American Chase Film and the Specter of Lynching2012In: A Companion to Early Cinema / [ed] André Gaudreault, Nicolas Dulac, Santiago Hidalgo, Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012, p. 257-276Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    National Soul/Cosmopolitan Skin: Swedish Cinema at a Crossroads2014In: Silent Cinema and the Politics of Space / [ed] Jennifer Bean et al, Bloomington: Indiana UP: Indiana University Press, 2014, p. 245-269Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Negotiating Peripheral Feature Market:Malmo–Copenhagen–Berlin/Kristianstad–Stockholm–Paris2010In: Domitor 2008: Les Cinémas périphériques dans la période des premier temps/Peripheral Early Cinema / [ed] François Amy de la Bretèque, Michel Cadé, Jordi Pons i Busquet, Angel Quintana, Perpignan: Presses Universitaires de Perpignan , 2010, 1, p. 131-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Nils Krok’s Social Pathos and Paul Garbagni’s Style: Ingeborg Holm as Objekt Lesson2010In: Film History. An International Journal, ISSN 0892-2160, E-ISSN 1553-3905, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 73-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay examines Victor Sjöström's Ingeborg Holm in terms of its exhibition and preservation history. Produced by Swedish Biograph in 1913, the film survives today in a truncated copy derived from a 1915 reissue. Key stylistic elements identified in the scholarly reception of Sjöström's film are discussed in relation to its influential predecessor, Paul Garbagni's I lifvets vår/Första älskarinnan (In the Springtime of Life, Swedish Biograph, 1912). Sjöström was a featured actor in Garbagni's film. A sketch of the institutional background of Swedish cinema in 1912, when Garbagni arrived at the brand new SB studio at Lidingö, introduces the discussion of Garbagni and Sjöström's work.

  • 27.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies. Jan Olsson.
    Notes on Floral Symbolism, Allegory, and Intermediality in the Films of D.W. Griffith2017In: A Companion to D.W. Griffith / [ed] Charles Keil, Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2017, p. 191-215Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    One Commercial Week2004In: Television After TV: Essays on a Medium in Transition, Durham and London: Duke University Press , 2004, p. 249-269Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    “Postmodern High Noon: 24 and the Shifting Landscape of Television”2008In: Shifting Landscapes: Media and Film in European Context, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing , 2008, p. 262-286Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Pressing Matters: Media Crusades before the Nickelodeons2015In: Film History. An International Journal, ISSN 0892-2160, E-ISSN 1553-3905, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 105-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Media crusades leveled at moving-picture exhibition in penny arcades and nickel shows are surprisingly consistent in their tropes and rhetorical strategies from the inaugural campaign in the San Francisco Call in 1899 to the famous one in the Chicago Tribune in 1907. This essay situates this emerging discourse on visual “corruption” alongside many other “evils” in the larger context of media activism. The critical tenet is the historiographic usefulness of mobilizing journalism as a day-to-day negotiation of media culture’s functions in modernity’s cityscape.

  • 31.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    “Quel film non esiste”2004In: Per Dreyer: Incarnazione del Cinema, Milan: Il Castoro , 2004, p. 126-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Rediscoveries and Restorations: Karusellen2010In: Le Giornate del Cinema Muto XXIX edizione, 29th Pordenone Silent Film festival, Pordenone: Associazone Culturale "Le Giornate del Cinema Muto" , 2010, p. 98-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Rooster Play: Pathé Frères and the Beginnings of In-Frame Trademarks2018In: Moving image, ISSN 1532-3978, E-ISSN 1542-4235, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 1-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Screen Bodies and Busybodies: Corporeal Constellations in the Era of Anonymity2013In: Film History. An International Journal, ISSN 0892-2160, E-ISSN 1553-3905, Vol. 25, no 1-2, p. 188-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay reappraises the discourse on and conceptualization of screen bodies, primarily in newsprint, prior to screen credits and ideas of stardom. The essay takes off from Richard deCordova's research in Picture Personalities and a series of texts on location shooting reprinted in the first volume of Moving Picture World (1907). It leads up to a portrait of John P. Wade as the first moving picture hero.

  • 35.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Shooting and shopping: Suiting Grant and dressing Saint2019In: Film Fashion and Consumption, ISSN 2044-2823, E-ISSN 2044-2831, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 49-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By investigating the fashion aspects of Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest (1959), this article argues for a heightened level of analytical attention to the many meanings of costume choices in the overall design of films. The text focuses on Cary Grant’s elegant, but famously manhandled suit as the film progresses, and how to understand its function and provenance in the grander scheme of ‘things’ in the film. In addition, Helen Rose’s discarded costume suggestions for Eva Marie Saint’s character are discussed – and how Hitchcock personally took on the role as personal shopper for Eve Kendall, Saint’s role. Further, the article highlights the collaborative nature of the film’s production and its pivotal ideas rather than argue for auteurist absolutism and a Hitchcock-alone approach to the film’s meaning. Ernest Lehman famously described his work on North by Northwest as an attempt to script ‘the Hitchcock picture to end all Hitchcock pictures’.

  • 36.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    ”Sound Aspirations: The Two Dimensions of Synchronicity”2004In: Le son en perspective: nouvelles recherches/New Perspectives in Sound Study, Bruxelles, P.I. E,-Peter Lang, 2004 , 2004, p. 99-114Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Stiller at first: A footnote2014In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 5-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article disentangles the confusion surrounding the production order of Mauritz Stiller’s film activities during his first months at AB Svenska Biografteatern (Svenska bio)/Swedish Biograph in 1912. Drawing on items from the extensive Stockholm press scene, it can be demonstrated that Stiller’s first film production indeed was the one that was first publicly screened, Mor och dotter/‘Mother and Daughter’ (1912) featuring Stiller, Anna Norrie and Lilly Jacobsson. The article also sheds light on Stiller’s role in Stockholm bohemian circles as local film production was ushered in.

  • 38.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    The Canon Revisited: Gunnar Hedes saga2009In: Le Giornate del Cinema Muto XXVIII edizione/28th Pordenone Silent Film festival, Pordenone: Associazone Culturale "Le Giornate del Cinema Muto" , 2009, p. 98-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    “Trading Places: Griffith, Patten and Agricultural Modernity”2005In: Film History, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 39-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Turning Garbo Watchable: From Swwedish Bread Bun to Hollywood Goddess2019In: Unwatchable / [ed] Nicholas Baer, Maggie Hennefeld, Laura Horak, Gunnar Iversen, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2019, p. 237-243Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Två Människor/Two People2005In: The Cinema of Scandinavia, London: Wallflower Press , 2005, p. 79-88Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42. Sørenssen, Bjørn
    et al.
    Salmi, Hannu
    Vestergaard Kau, Edvin
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    World War II and Scandinavian cinema: An overview2012In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 201-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article gives a short introduction to the distinctly different wartime experiences of the film industries in the Nordic countries during World War II.

1 - 42 of 42
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