Change search
Refine search result
1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Alonso-Mori, Roberto
    et al.
    Kern, Jan
    Gildea, Richard J.
    Sokaras, Dimosthenis
    Weng, Tsu-Chien
    Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt
    Tran, Rosalie
    Hattne, Johan
    Laksmono, Hartawan
    Hellmich, Julia
    Glöckner, Carina
    Echols, Nathaniel
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    Schafer, Donald W.
    Sellberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Kenney, Christopher
    Herbst, Ryan
    Pines, Jack
    Hart, Philip
    Herrmann, Sven
    Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.
    Latimer, Matthew J.
    Fry, Alan R.
    Messerschmidt, Marc M.
    Miahnahri, Alan
    Seibert, M. Marvin
    Zwart, Petrus H.
    White, William E.
    Adams, Paul D.
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Boutet, Sébastien
    Williams, Garth J.
    Zouni, Athina
    Messinger, Johannes
    Glatzel, Pieter
    Sauter, Nicholas K.
    Yachandra, Vittal K.
    Yano, Junko
    Bergmann, Uwe
    Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode2012In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 109, no 47, p. 19103-19107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this probe-before-destroy approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as well as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. K beta(1,3) XES spectra of Mn-II and Mn-2(III,IV) complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to > 100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. The technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II.

  • 2. Beye, M.
    et al.
    Anniyev, T.
    Coffee, R.
    Dell'Angela, M.
    Foehlisch, A.
    Gladh, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Katayama, T.
    Kaya, S.
    Krupin, O.
    Mogelhoj, A.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Nordlund, D.
    Norskov, J. K.
    Öberg, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Ogasawara, H.
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Schlotter, W. F.
    Sellberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Sorgenfrei, F.
    Turner, J. J.
    Wolf, M.
    Wurth, W.
    Öström, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Selective Ultrafast Probing of Transient Hot Chemisorbed and Precursor States of CO on Ru(0001)2013In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 110, no 18, article id 186101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have studied the femtosecond dynamics following optical laser excitation of CO adsorbed on a Ru surface by monitoring changes in the occupied and unoccupied electronic structure using ultrafast soft x-ray absorption and emission. We recently reported [M. Dell'Angela et al. Science 339, 1302 (2013)] a phonon-mediated transition into a weakly adsorbed precursor state occurring on a time scale of >2 ps prior to desorption. Here we focus on processes within the first picosecond after laser excitation and show that the metal-adsorbate coordination is initially increased due to hot-electron-driven vibrational excitations. This process is faster than, but occurs in parallel with, the transition into the precursor state. With resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, we probe each of these states selectively and determine the respective transient populations depending on optical laser fluence. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of CO adsorbed on Ru(0001) were performed at 1500 and 3000 K providing insight into the desorption process.

  • 3. Beye, Martin
    et al.
    Öberg, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Xin, Hongliang
    Dakovski, Georgi L.
    Dell'Angela, Martina
    Föhlisch, Alexander
    Gladh, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Hantschmann, Markus
    Hieke, Florian
    Kaya, Sarp
    Kuehn, Danilo
    LaRue, Jerry
    Mercurio, Giuseppe
    Minitti, Michael P.
    Mitra, Ankush
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Moeller, Stefan P.
    Ng, May Ling
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, United States.
    Nordlund, Dennis
    Norskov, Jens
    Östrom, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Ogasawara, Hirohito
    Persson, Mats
    Schlotter, William F.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, United States.
    Wolf, Martin
    Abild-Pedersen, Frank
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Wurth, Wilfried
    Chemical Bond Activation Observed with an X-ray Laser2016In: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, ISSN 1948-7185, E-ISSN 1948-7185, Vol. 7, no 18, p. 3647-3651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of bonding and antibonding orbitals is fundamental in chemistry. The population of those orbitals and the energetic difference between the two reflect the strength of the bonding interaction. Weakening the bond is expected to reduce this energetic splitting, but the transient character of bond-activation has so far prohibited direct experimental access. Here we apply time-resolved soft X-ray spectroscopy at a free electron laser to directly observe the decreased bonding antibonding splitting following bond-activation using an ultrashort optical laser pulse.

  • 4. Dell'Angela, M.
    et al.
    Anniyev, T.
    Beye, M.
    Coffee, R.
    Foehlisch, A.
    Gladh, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Katayama, T.
    Kaya, S.
    Krupin, O.
    LaRue, J.
    Mogelhoj, A.
    Nordlund, D.
    Norskov, J. K.
    Öberg, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Ogasawara, H.
    Öström, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Schlotter, W. F.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Sorgenfrei, F.
    Turner, J. J.
    Wolf, M.
    Wurth, W.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Real-Time Observation of Surface Bond Breaking with an X-ray Laser2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 339, no 6125, p. 1302-1305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron x-ray laser to probe the electronic structure of CO molecules as their chemisorption state on Ru(0001) changes upon exciting the substrate by using a femtosecond optical laser pulse. We observed electronic structure changes that are consistent with a weakening of the CO interaction with the substrate but without notable desorption. A large fraction of the molecules (30%) was trapped in a transient precursor state that would precede desorption. We calculated the free energy of the molecule as a function of the desorption reaction coordinate using density functional theory, including van der Waals interactions. Two distinct adsorption wells-chemisorbed and precursor state separated by an entropy barrier-explain the anomalously high prefactors often observed in desorption of molecules from metals.

  • 5. Dell'Angela, M.
    et al.
    Anniyev, T.
    Beye, M.
    Coffee, R.
    Foehlisch, A.
    Gladh, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kaya, S.
    Katayama, T.
    Krupin, O.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, USA; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Nordlund, D.
    Schlotter, W. F.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, USA.
    Sorgenfrei, F.
    Turner, J. J.
    Öström, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Ogasawara, H.
    Wolf, M.
    Wurth, W.
    Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer2015In: structural dynamics us, ISSN 2329-7778, Vol. 2, no 2, article id 025101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  • 6. Hattne, Johan
    et al.
    Echols, Nathaniel
    Tran, Rosalie
    Kern, Jan
    Gildea, Richard J.
    Brewster, Aaron S.
    Alonso-Mori, Roberto
    Gloeckner, Carina
    Hellmich, Julia
    Laksmono, Hartawan
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt
    Lampe, Alyssa
    Han, Guangye
    Gul, Sheraz
    DiFiore, Doerte
    Milathianaki, Despina
    Fry, Alan R.
    Miahnahri, Alan
    White, William E.
    Schafer, Donald W.
    Seibert, M. Marvin
    Koglin, Jason E.
    Sokaras, Dimosthenis
    Weng, Tsu-Chien
    Sellberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Latimers, Matthew J.
    Glatzel, Pieter
    Zwart, Petrus H.
    Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Messerschmidt, Marc
    Williams, Garth J.
    Boutet, Sebastien
    Messinger, Johannes
    Zouni, Athina
    Yano, Junko
    Bergmann, Uwe
    Yachandra, Vittal K.
    Adams, Paul D.
    Sauter, Nicholas K.
    Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers2014In: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 545-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and without radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract meaningful high-resolution signals from fewer diffraction measurements.

  • 7. Huang, Congcong
    et al.
    Wikfeldt, Thor Kjartan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nordlund, D.
    Bergmann, U.
    McQueen, T.
    Sellberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Pettersson, Lars G.M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Wide-angle X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics study of medium-range order in ambient and hot water2011In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 13, no 44, p. 19997-20007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed wide-angle X-ray diffraction measurements with high energy-resolution and accuracy to study water structure at three different temperatures (7, 25 and 66 degrees C) under normal pressure. Using a spherically curved Ge crystal an energy resolution better than 15 eV has been achieved which eliminates influence from Compton scattering. The high quality of the data allows for a reliable Fourier transform of the experimental data resolving shell structure out to similar to 12 angstrom, i.e. 5 hydration shells. Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the TIP4P/2005 force-field reproduce excellently the experimental shell-structure in the range 4-12 angstrom although less agreement is seen for the first peak in the intermolecular pair-correlation function (PCF). The Shiratani-Sasai Local Structure Index [J. Chem. Phys. 104, 7671 (1996)] identifies a tetrahedral minority giving the intermediate-range oscillations in the O-O PCF and a disordered majority providing a more featureless background in this range. The current study supports the proposal that the structure of liquid water, even at high temperatures, can be described in terms of a two-state fluctuation model involving local structures related to the high-density and low-density forms of liquid water postulated in the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis.

  • 8. Katayama, T.
    et al.
    Anniyev, T.
    Beye, M.
    Coffee, R.
    Dell'Angela, M.
    Foehlisch, A.
    Gladh, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kaya, S.
    Krupin, O.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Nordlund, D.
    Schlotter, W. F.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Sorgenfrei, F.
    Turner, J. J.
    Wurth, W.
    Östrom, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Ogasawara, H.
    Ultrafast soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of surface adsorbates using an X-ray free electron laser2013In: Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena, ISSN 0368-2048, E-ISSN 1873-2526, Vol. 187, p. 9-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on an experimental system designed to probe chemical reactions on solid surfaces on a sub-picosecond timescale using soft X-ray emission spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser (FEL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We analyzed the O 1s X-ray emission spectra recorded from atomic oxygen adsorbed on a Ru(0001) surface at a synchrotron beamline (SSRL, BL13-2) and an FEL beamline (LCLS, SXR). We have demonstrated conditions that provide negligible amount of FEL induced damage of the sample. In addition we show that the setup is capable of tracking the temporal evolution of electronic structure during a surface reaction of submonolayer quantities of CO molecules desorbing from the surface.

  • 9. Kern, Jan
    et al.
    Alonso-Mori, Roberto
    Hellmich, Julia
    Tran, Rosalie
    Hattne, Johan
    Laksmono, Hartawan
    Gloeckner, Carina
    Echols, Nathaniel
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    Sellberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt
    Gildea, Richard J.
    Glatzel, Pieter
    Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.
    Latimer, Matthew J.
    McQueen, Trevor A.
    DiFiore, Doerte
    Fry, Alan R.
    Messerschmidt, Marc
    Miahnahri, Alan
    Schafer, Donald W.
    Seibert, M. Marvin
    Sokaras, Dimosthenis
    Weng, Tsu-Chien
    Zwart, Petrus H.
    White, William E.
    Adams, Paul D.
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Boutet, Sebastien
    Williams, Garth J.
    Messinger, Johannes
    Sauter, Nicholas K.
    Zouni, Athina
    Bergmann, Uwe
    Yano, Junko
    Yachandra, Vittal K.
    Room temperature femtosecond X-ray diffraction of photosystem II microcrystals2012In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 109, no 25, p. 9721-9726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the dioxygen on earth is generated by the oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) using light from the sun. This lightdriven, four-photon reaction is catalyzed by the Mn4CaO5 cluster located at the lumenal side of PS II. Various X-ray studies have been carried out at cryogenic temperatures to understand the intermediate steps involved in the water oxidation mechanism. However, the necessity for collecting data at room temperature, especially for studying the transient steps during the O-O bond formation, requires the development of new methodologies. In this paper we report room temperature X-ray diffraction data of PS II microcrystals obtained using ultrashort (<50 fs) 9 keV X-ray pulses from a hard X-ray free electron laser, namely the Linac Coherent Light Source. The results presented here demonstrate that the probe before destroy approach using an X-ray free electron laser works even for the highly-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster in PS II at room temperature. We show that these data are comparable to those obtained in synchrotron radiation studies as seen by the similarities in the overall structure of the helices, the protein subunits and the location of the various cofactors. This work is, therefore, an important step toward future studies for resolving the structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster without any damage at room temperature, and of the reaction intermediates of PS II during O-O bond formation.

  • 10. Kern, Jan
    et al.
    Alonso-Mori, Roberto
    Tran, Rosalie
    Hattne, Johan
    Gildea, Richard J.
    Echols, Nathaniel
    Gloeckner, Carina
    Hellmich, Julia
    Laksmono, Hartawan
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt
    Koroidov, Sergey
    Lampe, Alyssa
    Han, Guangye
    Gul, Sheraz
    DiFiore, Doerte
    Milathianaki, Despina
    Fry, Alan R.
    Miahnahri, Alan
    Schafer, Donald W.
    Messerschmidt, Marc
    Seibert, M. Marvin
    Koglin, Jason E.
    Sokaras, Dimosthenis
    Weng, Tsu-Chien
    Sellberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Latimer, Matthew J.
    Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.
    Zwart, Petrus H.
    White, William E.
    Glatzel, Pieter
    Adams, Paul D.
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Williams, Garth J.
    Boutet, Sebastien
    Messinger, Johannes
    Zouni, Athina
    Sauter, Nicholas K.
    Yachandra, Vittal K.
    Bergmann, Uwe
    Yano, Junko
    Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction of Photosystem II at Room Temperature2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 340, no 6131, p. 491-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S-1) and the first illuminated state (S-2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD-XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies.

  • 11. Laksmono, Hartawan
    et al.
    McQueen, Trevor A.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Loh, N. Duane
    Huang, Congcong
    Schlesinger, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    Hampton, Christina Y.
    Nordlund, Dennis
    Beye, Martin
    Martin, Andrew V.
    Barty, Anton
    Seibert, M. Marvin
    Messerschmidt, Marc
    Williams, Garth J.
    Boutet, Sebastien
    Arnann-Winkel, Katrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. University of Innsbruck, Austria.
    Loerting, Thomas
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA; .
    Anomalous Behavior of the Homogeneous Ice Nucleation Rate in No-Man's Land2015In: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, ISSN 1948-7185, E-ISSN 1948-7185, Vol. 6, no 14, p. 2826-2832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an analysis of ice nucleation kinetics from near-ambient pressure water as temperature decreases below the homogeneous limit T-H by cooling micrometer-sized droplets (microdroplets) evaporatively at 10(3)-10(4) K/s and probing the structure ultrafast using femtosecond pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron X-ray laser. Below 232 K, we observed a slower nucleation rate increase with decreasing temperature than anticipated from previous measurements, which we suggest is due to the rapid decrease in water's diffusivity. This is consistent with earlier findings that microdroplets do not crystallize at <227 K, but vitrify at cooling rates of 10(6)-10(7) K/s. We also hypothesize that the slower increase in the nucleation rate is connected with the proposed fragile-to-strong transition anomaly in water.

  • 12. Mendez, Derek
    et al.
    Lane, Thomas J.
    Sung, Jongmin
    Sellberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Levard, Clement
    Watkins, Herschel
    Cohen, Aina E.
    Soltis, Michael
    Sutton, Shirley
    Spudich, James
    Pande, Vijay
    Ratner, Daniel
    Doniach, Sebastian
    Observation of correlated X-ray scattering at atomic resolution2014In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 369, no 1647, p. 20130315-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tools to study disordered systems with local structural order, such as proteins in solution, remain limited. Such understanding is essential for e. g. rational drug design. Correlated X-ray scattering (CXS) has recently attracted new interest as a way to leverage next-generation light sources to study such disordered matter. The CXS experiment measures angular correlations of the intensity caused by the scattering of X-rays from an ensemble of identical particles, with disordered orientation and position. Averaging over 15 496 snapshot images obtained by exposing a sample of silver nanoparticles in solution to a micro-focused synchrotron radiation beam, we report on experimental efforts to obtain CXS signal from an ensemble in three dimensions. A correlation function was measured at wide angles corresponding to atomic resolution that matches theoretical predictions. These preliminary results suggest that other CXS experiments on disordered ensembles-such as proteins in solution-may be feasible in the future.

  • 13.
    Schlesinger, Daniel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory2016In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 144, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics.

  • 14.
    Schlesinger, Daniel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theoryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15. Schreck, Simon
    et al.
    Beye, Martin
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    McQueen, Trevor
    Laksmono, Hartawan
    Kennedy, Brian
    Eckert, Sebastian
    Schlesinger, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nordlund, Dennis
    Ogasawara, Hirohito
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    Segtnan, Vegard H.
    Kubicek, Katharina
    Schlotter, William F.
    Dakovski, Georgi L.
    Moeller, Stefan P.
    Bergmann, Uwe
    Techert, Simone
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Wernet, Philippe
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Harada, Yoshihisa
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Foehlisch, Alexander
    Reabsorption of Soft X-Ray Emission at High X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Fluences2014In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 113, no 15, p. 153002-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on oxygen K-edge soft x-ray emission spectroscopy from a liquid water jet at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We observe significant changes in the spectral content when tuning over a wide range of incident x-ray fluences. In addition the total emission yield decreases at high fluences. These modifications result from reabsorption of x-ray emission by valence-excited molecules generated by the Auger cascade. Our observations have major implications for future x-ray emission studies at intense x-ray sources. We highlight the importance of the x-ray pulse length with respect to the core-hole lifetime.

  • 16.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    X-ray scattering and spectroscopy of supercooled water and ice2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents experimental studies of water and ice at near-atmospheric pressures using intense x-rays only accessible at synchrotrons and free-electron lasers. In particular, it focuses on the deeply supercooled, metastable state and its implications on ice nucleation.

    The local structure of the liquid phase was studied by x-ray scattering over a wide temperature range extending from 339 K down to 227 K. In order to be able to study the deeply supercooled liquid, micron-sized water droplets were evaporatively cooled in vacuum and probed by ultrashort x-ray pulses. This is to date the lowest temperature at which measurements of the structure have been performed on bulk liquid water cooled from room temperature. Upon deep supercooling, the structure evolved toward that of a low-density liquid with local tetrahedral coordination. At ~230 K, where the low-density liquid structure started to dominate, the number of droplets containing ice nuclei increased rapidly. The estimated nucleation rate suggests that there is a “fragile-to-strong” transition in the dynamics of the liquid below 230 K, and its implications on water structure are discussed.

    Similarly, the electronic structure of deeply supercooled water was studied by x-ray emission spectroscopy down to 222 K, but the spectral changes expected from the structural transformation remained absent and explanations are discussed. At high fluence, the non-linear dependence of the x-ray emission yield indicated that there were high valence hole densities created during the x-ray pulse length due to Auger cascades, resulting in reabsorption of the x-ray emission.

    Finally, the hydrogen-bonded network in water was studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy and compared to various ices. It was found that the pre-edge absorption cross-section, which is associated with distorted hydrogen bonds, could be minimized for crystalline ice grown on a hydrophobic BaF2(111) surface with low concentration of nucleation centers.

  • 17.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Huang, C.
    McQueen, T. A.
    Loh, N. D.
    Laksmono, H.
    Schlesinger, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sierra, R. G.
    Nordlund, D.
    Hampton, C. Y.
    Starodub, D.
    DePonte, D. P.
    Beye, M.
    Chen, C.
    Martin, A. V.
    Barty, A.
    Wikfeldt, Kjartan Thor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Weiss, T. M.
    Caronna, C.
    Feldkamp, J.
    Skinner, L. B.
    Seibert, M. M.
    Messerschmidt, M.
    Williams, G. J.
    Boutet, S.
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bogan, M. J.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Ultrafast X-ray probing of water structure below the homogeneous ice nucleation temperature2014In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 510, no 7505, p. 381-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water has a number of anomalous physical properties, and some of these become drastically enhanced on supercooling below the freezing point. Particular interest has focused on thermodynamic response functions that can be described using a normal component and an anomalous component that seems to diverge at about 228 kelvin (refs 1-3). This has prompted debate about conflicting theories(4-12) that aim to explain many of the anomalous thermodynamic properties of water. One popular theory attributes the divergence to a phase transition between two forms of liquid water occurring in the 'no man's land' that lies below the homogeneous ice nucleation temperature (T-H) at approximately 232 kelvin(13) and above about 160 kelvin(14), and where rapid ice crystallization has prevented any measurements of the bulk liquid phase. In fact, the reliable determination of the structure of liquid water typically requires temperatures above about 250 kelvin(2,15). Water crystallization has been inhibited by using nanoconfinement(16), nanodroplets(17) and association with biomolecules(16) to give liquid samples at temperatures below T-H, but such measurements rely on nanoscopic volumes of water where the interaction with the confining surfaces makes the relevance to bulk water unclear(18). Here we demonstrate that femtosecond X-ray laser pulses can be used to probe the structure of liquid water in micrometre-sized droplets that have been evaporatively cooled(19-21) below TH. We find experimental evidence for the existence of metastable bulk liquid water down to temperatures of 227(-1)(+2) kelvin in the previously largely unexplored no man's land. We observe a continuous and accelerating increase in structural ordering on supercooling to approximately 229 kelvin, where the number of droplets containing ice crystals increases rapidly. But a few droplets remain liquid for about a millisecond even at this temperature. The hope now is that these observations and our detailed structural data will help identify those theories that best describe and explain the behaviour of water.

  • 18.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Kaya, Sarp
    Segtnan, Vegard H.
    Chen, Chen
    Tyliszczak, Tolek
    Ogasawara, Hirohito
    Nordlund, Dennis
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Comparison of x-ray absorption spectra between water and ice: New ice data with low pre-edge absorption cross-section2014In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 141, no 3, p. 034507-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of crystal growth conditions on the O K-edge x-ray absorption spectra of ice is investigated through detailed analysis of the spectral features. The amount of ice defects is found to be minimized on hydrophobic surfaces, such as BaF2(111), with low concentration of nucleation centers. This is manifested through a reduction of the absorption cross-section at 535 eV, which is associated with distorted hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, a connection is made between the observed increase in spectral intensity between 544 and 548 eV and high-symmetry points in the electronic band structure, suggesting a more extended hydrogen-bond network as compared to ices prepared differently. The spectral differences for various ice preparations are compared to the temperature dependence of spectra of liquid water upon supercooling. A double-peak feature in the absorption cross-section between 540 and 543 eV is identified as a characteristic of the crystalline phase. The connection to the interpretation of the liquid phase O K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum is extensively discussed.

  • 19.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    McQueen, Trevor A.
    Laksmono, Hartawan
    Schreck, Simon
    Beye, Martin
    DePonte, Daniel P.
    Kennedy, Brian
    Nordlund, Dennis
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    Schlesinger, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Tokushima, Takashi
    Zhovtobriukh, Iurii
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Eckert, Sebastian
    Segtnan, Vegard H.
    Ogasawara, Hirohito
    Kubicek, Katharina
    Techert, Simone
    Bergmann, Uwe
    Dakovski, Georgi L.
    Schlotter, William F.
    Harada, Yoshihisa
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Wernet, Philippe
    Foehlisch, Alexander
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    X-ray emission spectroscopy of bulk liquid water in no-man's land2015In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 142, no 4, article id 044505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of bulk liquid water was recently probed by x-ray scattering below the temperature limit of homogeneous nucleation (T-H) of similar to 232 K [J. A. Sellberg et al., Nature 510, 381-384 (2014)]. Here, we utilize a similar approach to study the structure of bulk liquid water below T-H using oxygen K-edge x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Based on previous XES experiments [T. Tokushima et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 460, 387-400 (2008)] at higher temperatures, we expected the ratio of the 1b(1)' and 1b(1) peaks associated with the lone-pair orbital in water to change strongly upon deep supercooling as the coordination of the hydrogen (H-) bonds becomes tetrahedral. In contrast, we observed only minor changes in the lone-pair spectral region, challenging an interpretation in terms of two interconverting species. A number of alternative hypotheses to explain the results are put forward and discussed. Although the spectra can be explained by various contributions from these hypotheses, we here emphasize the interpretation that the line shape of each component changes dramatically when approaching lower temperatures, where, in particular, the peak assigned to the proposed disordered component would become more symmetrical as vibrational interference becomes more important.

  • 20.
    Sellberg, Jonas Alexander
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Huang, Congcong
    McQueen, Trevor A.
    Loh, N. Duane
    Laksmono, Hartawan
    Schlesinger, Daniel
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    Nordlund, Dennis
    Hampton, Christina H.
    Starodub, Dmitri
    DePonte, Daniel P.
    Beye, Martin
    Chen, Chen
    Martin, Andrew V.
    Barty, Anton
    Wikfeldt, Kjartan Thor
    Weiss, Thomas M.
    Caronna, Chiara
    Feldkamp, Jan
    Skinner, Lawrie B.
    Seibert, Marvin M.
    Messerschmidt, Marc
    Williams, Garth J.
    Boutet, Sebastien
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Experimental Observation of Bulk Liquid Water Structure in “No-man’s Land”Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Sellberg, Jonas Alexander
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kaya, Sarp
    Segtnan, Vegard H.
    Chen, Chen
    Tyliszczak, Tolek
    Ogasawara, Hirohito
    Nordlund, Dennis
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Comparison of x-ray absorption spectra between water and ice: new ice data with low pre-edge absorption cross-sectionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 22. Sierra, Raymond G.
    et al.
    Laksmono, Hartawan
    Kern, Jan
    Tran, Rosalie
    Hattne, Johan
    Alonso-Mori, Roberto
    Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt
    Gloeckner, Carina
    Hellmich, Julia
    Schafer, Donald W.
    Echols, Nathaniel
    Gildea, Richard J.
    Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.
    Sellberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    McQueen, Trevor A.
    Fry, Alan R.
    Messerschmidt, Marc M.
    Miahnahri, Alan
    Seibert, M. Marvin
    Hampton, Christina Y.
    Starodub, Dmitri
    Loh, N. Duane
    Sokaras, Dimosthenis
    Weng, Tsu-Chien
    Zwart, Petrus H.
    Glatzel, Pieter
    Milathianaki, Despina
    White, William E.
    Adams, Paul D.
    Williams, Garth J.
    Boutet, Sebastien
    Zouni, Athina
    Messinger, Johannes
    Sauter, Nicholas K.
    Bergmann, Uwe
    Yano, Junko
    Yachandra, Vittal K.
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Nanoflow electrospinning serial femtosecond crystallography2012In: Acta Crystallographica Section D: Biological Crystallography, ISSN 0907-4449, E-ISSN 1399-0047, Vol. 68, p. 1584-1587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An electrospun liquid microjet has been developed that delivers protein microcrystal suspensions at flow rates of 0.14-3.1 mu l min(-1) to perform serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies with X-ray lasers. Thermolysin microcrystals flowed at 0.17 mu l min(-1) and diffracted to beyond 4 angstrom resolution, producing 14 000 indexable diffraction patterns, or four per second, from 140 mu g of protein. Nanoflow electrospinning extends SFX to biological samples that necessitate minimal sample consumption.

  • 23. Xin, H.
    et al.
    LaRue, J.
    Öberg, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Beye, M.
    Dell'Angela, M.
    Turner, J. J.
    Gladh, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Ng, M. L.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kaya, S.
    Mercurio, G.
    Hieke, F.
    Nordlund, D.
    Schlotter, W. F.
    Dakovski, G. L.
    Minitti, M. P.
    Foehlisch, A.
    Wolf, M.
    Wurth, W.
    Ogasawara, H.
    Norskov, J. K.
    Östrom, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Abild-Pedersen, E.
    Strong Influence of Coadsorbate Interaction on CO Desorption Dynamics on Ru(0001) Probed by Ultrafast X-Ray Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Simulations2015In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 114, no 15, article id 156101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that coadsorbed oxygen atoms have a dramatic influence on the CO desorption dynamics from Ru(0001). In contrast to the precursor-mediated desorption mechanism on Ru(0001), the presence of surface oxygen modifies the electronic structure of Ru atoms such that CO desorption occurs predominantly via the direct pathway. This phenomenon is directly observed in an ultrafast pump-probe experiment using a soft x-ray free-electron laser to monitor the dynamic evolution of the valence electronic structure of the surface species. This is supported with the potential of mean force along the CO desorption path obtained from density-functional theory calculations. Charge density distribution and frozen-orbital analysis suggest that the oxygen-induced reduction of the Pauli repulsion, and consequent increase of the dative interaction between the CO 5 sigma and the charged Ru atom, is the electronic origin of the distinct desorption dynamics. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of CO desorption from Ru(0001) and oxygen-coadsorbed Ru(0001) provide further insights into the surface bond-breaking process.

  • 24.
    Öberg, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gladh, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Dell'Angela, M.
    Anniyev, T.
    Beye, M.
    Coffee, R.
    Föhlisch, A.
    Katayama, T.
    Kaya, S.
    LaRue, J.
    Mögelhöj, A.
    Nordlund, D.
    Ogasawara, H.
    Schlotter, W. F.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Sorgenfrei, F.
    Turner, J. J.
    Wolf, M.
    Wurth, W.
    Öström, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Nörskov, J. K.
    Pettersson, L. G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Optical laser-induced CO desorption from Ru(0001) monitored with a free-electron X-ray laser: DFT prediction and X-ray confirmation of a precursor state2015In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 640, p. 80-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present density functional theory modeling of time-resolved optical pump/X-ray spectroscopic probe data of CO desorption from Ru(0001). The BEEF van der Waals functional predicts a weakly bound state as a precursor to desorption. The optical pump leads to a near-instantaneous (<100 fs) increase of the electronic temperature to nearly 7000 K. The temperature evolution and energy transfer between electrons, substrate phonons and adsorbate is described by the two-temperature model and found to equilibrate on a timescale of a few picoseconds to an elevated local temperature of similar to 2000K. Estimating the free energy based on the computed potential of mean force along the desorption path, we find an entropic barrier to desorption (and by time-reversal also to adsorption). This entropic barrier separates the chemisorbed and precursor states, and becomes significant at the elevated temperature of the experiment (similar to 1.4 eV at 2000 K). Experimental pump-probe X-ray absorption/X-ray emission spectroscopy indicates population of a precursor state to desorption upon laser-excitation of the system (Dell'Angela et al., 2013). Computing spectra along the desorption path confirms the picture of a weakly bound transient state arising from ultrafast heating of the metal substrate.

  • 25.
    Östrom, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Öberg, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Xin, H.
    Larue, J.
    Beye, M.
    Dell'Angela, M.
    Gladh, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Ng, M. L.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Kaya, S.
    Mercurio, G.
    Nordlund, D.
    Hantschmann, M.
    Hieke, F.
    Kuehn, D.
    Schlotter, W. F.
    Dakovski, G. L.
    Turner, J. J.
    Minitti, M. P.
    Mitra, A.
    Moeller, S. P.
    Foehlisch, A.
    Wolf, M.
    Wurth, W.
    Persson, M.
    Norskov, J. K.
    Abild-Pedersen, F.
    Ogasawara, H.
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Probing the transition state region in catalytic CO oxidation on Ru2015In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 347, no 6225, p. 978-982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Femtosecond x-ray laser pulses are used to probe the carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation reaction on ruthenium (Ru) initiated by an optical laser pulse. On a time scale of a few hundred femtoseconds, the optical laser pulse excites motions of CO and oxygen (O) on the surface, allowing the reactants to collide, and, with a transient close to a picosecond (ps), new electronic states appear in the OK-edge x-ray absorption spectrum. Density functional theory calculations indicate that these result from changes in the adsorption site and bond formation between CO and O with a distribution of OC-O bond lengths close to the transition state (TS). After 1 ps, 10% of the CO populate the TS region, which is consistent with predictions based on a quantum oscillator model.

1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf