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  • 1.
    Bejnö, Hampus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Johansson, Susanna
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Grimaldi, Lauren
    Cepeda, Ray
    Emergent Language Responses Following Match-to-Sample Training among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder2018In: International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy / Revista Internacional de Psicologia y Terapia Psicologica, ISSN 1577-7057, E-ISSN 2340-2857, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explored the effects of match-to-sample training on emergent responses in the domains of receptive and expressive language among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in an applied setting. A concurrent multiple probe design across six participants was applied, with a follow-up after 10 days. All six children participated in a match-to-sample training procedure. The participants were trained to match a picture card of an item with a word card corresponding to the name of the item, and a word card of an item with a picture card corresponding to the name of the item. After training, three participants developed the emergent responses of receptively identifying and expressively naming both picture cards and word cards. There was a correspondence between acquired matching skills and the development of emergent language responses. Follow-up measures showed that the acquired emergent responses remained somewhat stable over time. The results are discussed in relation to prior research and in terms of implications for teaching children with ASD language skills in applied settings such as preschools. The results are also discussed in relation to the participant’s prior verbal skills and to the retention of emergent language responses.

  • 2. Ejeby, Kersti
    et al.
    Savitskij, Ruslan
    Öst, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Brandt, Lena
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Åsberg, Marie
    Backlund, Lars G.
    Randomized controlled trial of transdiagnostic group treatments for primary care patients with common mental disorders2014In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, E-ISSN 1460-2229, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 273-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The purpose was to test the effectiveness of two transdiagnostic group interventions compared to care as usual (CAU) for patients with anxiety, depressive or stress-related disorders within a primary health care context. Objectives. To compare the effects of cognitive-based-behavioural therapy (CBT) and multimodal intervention (MMI) on the quality of life and relief of psychological symptoms of patients with common mental disorders or problems attending primary health care centre. Methods. Patients (n = 278), aged 18-65 years, were referred to the study by the GPs and 245 were randomized to CAU or one of two group interventions in addition to CAU: (i) group CBT administered by psychologists and (ii) group MMI administered by assistant nurses. The primary outcome measure was the Mental Component Summary score of short form 36. Secondary outcome measures were Perceived Stress Scale and Self-Rating Scale for Affective Syndromes. The data were analysed using intention-to-treat with a linear mixed model. Results. On the primary outcome measure, the mean improvement based on mixed model analyses across post-and follow-up assessment was significantly larger for the MMI group than for the CBT (4.0; P = 0.020) and CAU (7.5; P = .001) groups. Participants receiving CBT were significantly more improved than those in the CAU group. On four of the secondary outcome measures, the MMI group was significantly more improved than the CBT and CAU groups. The course of improvement did not differ between the CBT group and the CAU group on these measures. Conclusions. Transdiagnostic group treatment can be effective for patients with common mental disorders when delivered in a primary care setting. The group format and transdiagnostic approach fit well with the requirements of primary care.

  • 3. Ejeby, Kersti
    et al.
    Savitskij, Ruslan
    Öst, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Brandt, Lena
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Åsberg, Marie
    Backlund, Lars G.
    Symptom reduction due to psychosocial interventions is not accompanied by a reduction in sick leave: Results from a randomized controlled trial in primary care2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 67-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate whether interventions that have positive effects on psychological symptoms and quality of life compared with usual care would also reduce days on sick leave. Design. A randomized controlled trial. Setting. A large primary health care centre in Stockholm, Sweden. Intervention. Patients with common mental disorders were recruited by their GPs and randomized into one of two group interventions that took place in addition to usual care. These group interventions were: (a) group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and (b) group multimodal intervention (MMI). Both types of intervention had previously shown significant effects on quality of life, and MMI had also shown significant effects on psychological symptoms. Patients. Of the 245 randomized patients, 164 were employed and had taken sick leave periods of at least two weeks in length during the study period of two years. They comprised the study group. Main outcome measures. The odds, compared with usual care, for being sick-listed at different times relative to the date of randomization. Results. The mean number of days on sick leave increased steadily in the two years before randomization and decreased in the two years afterwards, showing the same pattern for all three groups. The CBT and MMI interventions did not show the expected lower odds for sick-listing compared with usual care during the two-year follow-up. Conclusion. Reduction in psychological symptoms and increased well-being did not seem to be enough to reduce sickness absence for patients with common mental problems in primary care. The possibility of adding workplace-oriented interventions is discussed.

  • 4.
    Folke, Fredrik
    et al.
    Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
    von Bahr, Mari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Assadi-Talaremi, Vandad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Exposure and response prevention in the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder: A case series2012In: Pragmatic Case Studies in Psychotherapy, ISSN 1553-0124, E-ISSN 1553-0124, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 255-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study investigates the effect of exposure and response prevention in relation to other components present in behavioral therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). Treatment components were added one at a time in four consecutive phases: A1) Self-Monitoring; B) Therapist Contact; C) Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP); and, A2) Renewed Self-Monitoring. Client assessment involved (a) a daily self-report diary of BDD symptoms throughout treatment and (b) periodic completion of standardized self-report measures tapping BDD symptoms and related symptoms of depression and global functioning. In all, six clients participated in the study. Three clients (Ms. A, Ms. B, and Ms. C) made large or relatively large improvements in their daily self-reported BDD symptoms during the exposure and response prevention treatment phase. A fourth client (Mr. D) did not make such an improvement during this phase, but made overall progress over the course of treatment. All four of these clients achieved statistically significant improvement over baseline on the standardized BDD measure. One client (Ms. E) dropped out of treatment during the ERP phase, and one (Ms. F) chose not to proceed to the ERP phase after receiving education about it. The results indicate that beneficial effects of treatment occurred during the ERP phase for three of the clients, and thus suggest that this component should, in spite of clients’ almost reflexive, initial skepticism, be considered essential in the behavioral treatment of Body Dysmorphic Disorder. The variety of reactions of the different clients to the treatments is documented and discussed, along with an analysis of the factors that differentiated those clients who found the ERP phase helpful and those who did not.

  • 5.
    Jansson, Billy
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Tham, Kåre
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    A Structured Approach to Goal Formulation in Psychotherapy: Differences between Patients and Controls2015In: International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy / Revista Internacional de Psicologia y Terapia Psicologica, ISSN 1577-7057, E-ISSN 2340-2857, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 181-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic goals are considered a vital component in psychological treatments, but to date relatively little attention has been paid to the assessment and evaluation of these goals. In order to validate of a self-rating version of the Bern Inventory of Therapeutic goals checklist (BIT-C), the present study investigated if goals, measured this way, can differentiate between patients (n= 147) and healthy controls (n= 106). Results suggested that BIT-C was successful in discriminating between client and non-clients. Most importantly, clients had a higher tendency to endorse goal categories related to depressive symptoms, substance abuse, coping with somatic problems and current relationships, but a lower tendency to endorse goal categories relating to eating behaviors compared to non-patients. Further, patients perceived attainment of prioritized goals as more distant than non-patients did. The results were discussed in terms of BIT-C being a measure that can be readily applied to identify key targets in psychological treatments.

  • 6.
    Johansson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Jönsson, Arne
    Arbitrarily applicable relational responding as non-axiomatic logical reasoning2018In: Proceedings of the 14th SweCog Conference / [ed] Tom Ziemke, Mattias Arvola, Nils Dahlbäck, Erik Billing, Skövde: University of Skövde , 2018, p. 7-9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the research tradition called “contextual behavioral science” (Zettle, Hayes, & Barnes-Holmes, 2016) it is argued that a large part of cognitive phenomena are made possible due to a type of operant behavior known as “arbitrarily applicable relational responding”. Relational Frame Theory (RFT; Hayes, Barnes-Holmes, & Roche, 2001; Roche & Dymond, 2013) is a contextual behavioral account of language and cognition. RFT aims to develop a unified account of language and cognition and have been showed to account for as diverse topics as language development, the emergence of a self, human suffering, intelligence, problem solving, etc. The fundamental thesis of RFT is that language and cognition are all instances of arbitrarily applicable relational responding (AARR). According to this perspective, relating means responding to one event in terms of another. While both non-humans and humans are able to respond relationally, only humans seem to able to do this arbitrarily. For example, a human being can be presented with three similar coins and being told that “coin A is worth less than coin B, which in turn is worth less than coin C”. The fact that a human being in some context would immediately pick coin A, is to RFT an example of AARR in which stimuli are arbitrarily related along a comparative dimension of worth.

    NARS (Non-Axiomatic Reasoning System; Wang, 2006, 2013) is a project aiming to building a general purpose intelligent system. An assumption in NARS is that the essence of intelligence is the principle of adapting to the environment while working with insufficient knowledge and resources. Accordingly, an intelligent system should rely on finite processing capacity, work in real time, be open to unexpected tasks, and learn from experience. NARS is built as a reasoning system, using a formal specification “non-axiomatic logic” (NAL) to define its functionality. NAL is designed incrementally with multiple layers. At each layer, NAL and its internal language Narsese are extended to have a higher expressive power, a richer semantics, and a larger set of inference rules, so as to increase the intelligence of the system. The reasoning process in NARS uniformly carries out many cognitive functions that are traditionally studied as separate processes with different mechanisms, such as learning, perceiving, planning, predicting, remembering, problem solving, decision making, etc.

    The primary aim of this work is to investigate if NARS can do AARR with gradually increasing complexity, and under which conditions this is made possible. Potential applications are for example describing and exploring mental health phenomena within an artificial general intelligence framework.

  • 7. Kaldo, Viktor
    et al.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jernelöv, Susanna
    Involving clients in treatment methods: A neglected interaction in the therapeutic relationship2015In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 83, no 6, p. 1136-1141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The authors investigate a model on how clients’ differential involvement in therapeutic methods mediates the effect of therapist support in psychological treatment—in this case, a cognitive behaviorally based bibliotherapy for insomnia, administered with or without supportive telephone calls. Method: Eighty-nine participants, who fulfilled diagnostic criteria for insomnia, had a mean age of 49.1 years (range, 18–73 years) and were predominantly female (77%), fairly well educated, and mainly Caucasian. Participants were randomized between a bibliotherapeutic self-help treatment and the same treatment with the addition of therapist support. Primary outcome measure was the Insomnia Severity Index. Data on involvement in different methods and aspects of the treatment were estimated by clients at posttreatment and validated against therapist ratings of client involvement during treatment. Structural equation modeling was used to test if the effect of therapeutic support on outcome was mediated by involvement in treatment. Results: Carrying out the treatment with therapist support significantly boosted the therapeutic effects. A mediational analysis with involvement in the three key treatment methods (sleep restriction, sleep compression, and stimulus control) as the mediator fully mediated the differential effect between the two conditions (Sobel test; r = .31; z = 2.173; p < .05) and explained 68.4% of the total effect. Conclusions: Therapeutic support improved outcome via higher patient involvement rather than having a direct effect on outcome. Thus, relationship and methods could be regarded as interactional, and patient involvement should be considered. These factors could be further studied in treatments where specific ingredients within the therapeutic contact can be experimentally manipulated.

  • 8.
    Linde, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Rück, Christian
    Bjureberg, Johan
    Ivanov, Volen Z.
    Djurfeldt, Diana Radu
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Acceptance-Based Exposure Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder: a Pilot Study2015In: Behavior Therapy, ISSN 0005-7894, E-ISSN 1878-1888, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 423-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is an often severe, chronic, and disabling disorder, and although some controlled trials of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) have shown efficacy, the body of evidence is still limited. The condition is generally considered difficult to treat, and further research to determine the effectiveness of psychological treatments for BDD is needed. The present study is the first to evaluate an acceptance-based therapy for BDD. In total, 21 patients received a 12-week group treatment consisting of weekly sessions of psychoeducation, acceptance and defusion practice, and exposure exercises to foster acceptance of internal discomfort and to strengthen the patients’ committed purposeful actions. The primary outcome was BDD symptomatology (measured on the BDD-YBOCS) assessed by a psychiatrist before and after treatment and at 6 months follow-up. The secondary outcomes were self-rated BDD symptoms, psychological flexibility, depressive symptoms, quality of life, and disability. Reductions in BDD symptomatology from pre- to posttreatment were significant and showed a large effect size, d = 1.93 (95% CI 0.82–3.04). At posttreatment, 68% of the participants showed clinically significant improvement in the primary outcome variable. Treatment gains were maintained at 6 months follow-up. The treatment also resulted in significant improvements in all secondary outcomes. The dropout rate was low; 90.5% of the participants completed treatment. This study suggests that acceptance-based exposure therapy may be an efficacious and acceptable treatment for BDD that warrants further investigation in larger controlled trials.

  • 9. Molander, Olof
    et al.
    Lindner, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm Center for Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Bjureberg, Johan
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm Center for Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Internet-based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Gambling Disorder and Psychiatric Co-morbidities: A Pilot Study Protocol2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is recommended to address the high prevalence of co-occurring mental ill health in problem gamblers, there are, to our knowledge, no specific treatment protocols available targeting psychiatric co-morbidities. Furthermore, psychiatric co-morbidities are seldom addressed in gambling treatment studies.

    Intervention: We are currently developing a new internet-based CBT protocol based on the Pathways model [1]. Briefly, this etiological model states that there are distinct pathways for development and maintenance of gambling problem in conjunction with psychiatric co-morbidities. Our treatment will offer tailored behavioral interventions targeting the specific maintenance processes for each gambling pathway proposed by the Pathway model.

    Methods: Treatment-seeking participants (N=20) with Gambling Disorder and psychiatric co-morbidities will be recruited in a first pilot study delivered via the internet. In addition to evaluating feasibility and potential efficacy, we will examine moderators according to the proposed maintenance processes in the Pathways model.

    Results: The pilot study is planned to commence spring 2019.

    Conclusion: The results of the pilot study will hopefully contribute to specific knowledge regarding treatment interventions for gamblers with psychiatric co-morbidities, as well as to the research field as a whole.

  • 10.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Depression2013In: KBT inom psykiatrin / [ed] Lar-Göran Öst, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2013, 2, p. 193-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Depression och bipolär störning.2006In: Kognitiv Beteendeterapi inom Psykiatrin., Natur och Kultur, Stockholm , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kognitiv beteendeterapi är idag en etablerad behandlingsform vid depression och som även finner ett ökat stöd vid bipolär störning. Detta bokkapitel går igenom grundläggande begrepp för att förstå och behandla dessa besvär utifrån ett kognitivt beteendeterapeutiskt perspektiv.

  • 12.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Exposure Therapy for Anxiety Disorders: Is There Room for Cognitive Interventions?2012In: Exposure Therapy: Rethinkning the model - Refining the method / [ed] Peter Neudeck, Hans-Ulrich Wittchen, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2012, p. 275-298Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that methods of exposure therapy have proven to be highly effective in various empirical studies, they are still underused and sometimes subject to controversial discussion. There have been significant developments: In recent years, methods of exposure therapy have been applied in various areas of therapy, including body dysmorphic disorder and hypochondriasis. Exposure techniques also play an important role in the so called "third wave therapies" (Acceptance & Commitment Therapy, Dialectical Behavior Therapy). And there is more recently a revival of exposure in panic and agoraphobia and GAD. On the other hand, a large number of scientific articles discuss the practical applications (ethical aspects, amount of exposure) and the theoretical foundations (habituation) of exposure therapy. In order to provide an overview of the current debate and to point out the latest developments in the area of exposure therapy, we have decided to present the current state of discussion (most contributors are scientist-practitioners) to an interested professional audience.

  • 13.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Folke, Fredrik
    Exposure Therapy: What Is It That We Are Selling?2012In: Pragmatic Case Studies in Psychotherapy, ISSN 1553-0124, E-ISSN 1553-0124, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 296-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This discussion is a response to Muller and Schultz’s (2012) thoughtful commentary on our case series on treating Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) in this issue of the Pragmatic Case Studies in Psychotherapy. We join Muller and Schultz in their dedication to exposure treatment. We  elaborate on their perceptive comments on what exposure is, and how it is presented, applied, and implemented most effectively, in the context of  BDD specifically. We conclude by briefly exploring some of the complexities of the theory underlying exposure therapy.

  • 14.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Folke, Fredrik
    Kanter, Jonathan W.
    A learning theory account of depression2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 73-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning theory provides a foundation for understanding and deriving treatment principles for impacting a spectrum of functional processes relevant to the construct of depression. While behavioral interventions have been commonplace in the cognitive behavioral tradition, most often conceptualized within a cognitive theoretical framework, recent years have seen renewed interest in more purely behavioral models. These modern learning theory accounts of depression focus on the interchange between behavior and the environment, mainly in terms of lack of reinforcement, extinction of instrumental behavior, and excesses of aversive control, and include a conceptualization of relevant cognitive and emotional variables. These positions, drawn from extensive basic and applied research, cohere with biological theories on reduced reward learning and reward responsiveness and views of depression as a heterogeneous, complex set of disorders. Treatment techniques based on learning theory, often labeled Behavioral Activation (BA) focus on activating the individual in directions that increase contact with potential reinforcers, as defined ideographically with the client. BA is considered an empirically well-established treatment that generalizes well across diverse contexts and populations. The learning theory account is discussed in terms of being a parsimonious model and ground for treatments highly suitable for large scale dissemination.

  • 15.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Gustavsson, Thomas
    Lundgren, Tobias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Må dåligt: Om psykopatologi i vardagslivet2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    När vi ställs inför ångest, depression, självskadebeteende och psykos uppfattar vi det ofta som svårbegripligt och främmande. Med Må dåligt vill författarna öka förståelsen för psykisk ohälsa.  De visar både hur olika tillstånd yttrar sig i vardagslivet och hur allmänmänskliga psykologiska processer bidrar till dem. Bokens utgångspunkt är att psykisk ohälsa utvecklas i samspel mellan den omgivande miljön och vad vi lär oss av våra erfarenheter under livet. Ett huvudbudskap är att psykisk hälsa inte är detsamma som ett liv fritt från det som kan vara plågsamt, utan det avgörande är ett liv som är värt att leva.

  • 16.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Jansson, Billy
    The stability of treatment goals, as assessed by a Swedish version of the Bern Inventory of Treatment Goals2016In: Nordic Psychology, ISSN 1901-2276, E-ISSN 1904-0016, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 30-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Formulating treatment goals has been shown to be an area of vital concern for both outcome and treatment processes. However, it is not as yet an area of structured routine assessment, either in clinical practice or in research. One possible explanation for this is the lack of validated and readily available goal assessment procedures. The present study investigated the test–retest stability of a Swedish translation of the checklist version of the Bern Inventory of Treatment Goals (BIT-C) among 30 patients in primary care. We calculated the consistency of the endorsement of the different therapeutic goal categories over a 2-week period prior to treatment. There were no changes in symptoms or quality-of-life-related measures between the two assessment points. Overall, the goal category items in BIT-C were found to demonstrate moderate to substantial reliability. In conclusion, even though our study was small, it provided initial psychometric support for the Swedish version of BIT-C as a clinically useful tool for the assessment of treatment goals.

  • 17.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Jansson, Billy
    Treatment goals and their attainment: A structured approach to assessment and evaluation2016In: The Cognitive Behaviour Therapist, ISSN 0965-5794, E-ISSN 1754-470X, Vol. 9, article id e2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment goals are considered a vital part of therapeutic work, and their role is often emphasized in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). However, the attainment of goals is rarely accounted for in terms of treatment outcome. In this study, we set out to investigate a structured format for goal assessment and goal attainment in CBT delivered as routine care. We were especially interested in the sensitivity to change in perceived goal attainment. Patients completed a self-administered version of the Bern Inventory of Treatment Goals (BIT-C) and rated their perceived attainment on a maximum of five prioritized goals before and after 12 weeks of treatment, along with measures on anxiety, depression and health-related quality of life. The results indicated that the prioritized goals only partially correspond to disorder-specific concerns, and that perceived proximity to treatment goals is clearly associated with improvements following treatment. The results are discussed in terms of the BIT-C being a promising tool for use in clinical settings in assessing treatment goals as well as in evaluating the attainment of these goals.

  • 18.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Molander, Olof
    Lindner, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    What can be learned about gambling from a learning perspective?: A narrative review2019In: Nordic Psychology, ISSN 1901-2276, E-ISSN 1904-0016, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 303-322Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gambling is a field that harbors both harmless recreational activities and pathological varieties that may be considered an addictive disorder. It is also a field that deserves special interest from a learning theoretical perspective, since pathological gambling represents both a pure behavioral addiction involving no ingestion of substances and behavior that exhibits extreme resistance to extinction. As the field of applied psychology of learning, or behavior analysis, espouses a bottom-up approach, the basis of understanding begins in basic research on behavioral principles. This article provides a narrative review of the field of laboratory experiments conducted to disentangle the learning processes of gambling behavior. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of learning principles in gambling that has been demonstrated under lab conditions and that may be of importance in the development of clinical applications when gambling has become a problem. Several processes, like the importance of delay and probability discounting, reinforcement without actual winning, and rule governed behavior have been experimentally verified. The common denominator appears to be that they impede extinction. Other areas, especially Pavlovian conditioning, are scarce in the literature. Our recommendations for the future would be to study Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning in interaction. Treatment programs should profit from strategies that serve to enhance extinction learning. We also conclude that online gambling should provide a promising environment for controlled research on how to limit excessive gambling, provided that the gambling companies are interested in that.

  • 19.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Torneke, Niklas
    On Having a Goal: Goals as Representations or Behavior2015In: Psychological Records, ISSN 0033-2933, E-ISSN 2163-3452, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 89-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article discusses the concepts of having a goal and of goal-directed behavior from a behavior-analytic perspective. In clinical psychology as well as in the study of human behavior at large, goals delineate an important area of investigation when it comes to health, well-being, and behavioral change. While concepts like goals and goal-directed behavior may be more frequently used outside the theoretical boundaries of behavior analysis, we argue that by incorporating recent behavior analytic research on verbal behavior, new and fruitful ways open up for approaching the phenomenon of having a goal. A behavior-analytic approach thereby may increase both precision in understanding and the potential for influencing essential aspects of human behavior. This analysis starts with the concept of rule-governed behavior and develops that analysis by using the concept of derived relational responding.

  • 20.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Törneke, Niklas
    Adfaerdens ABC: en introduktion til behavioristisk psykoterapi2010Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [da]

    I de senere år er der opstået fornyet interesse for indlæringspsykologien - også inden for de kliniske anvendelsesområder. Den øgede interesse har medført et større fokus på adfærdsterapiens grundlæggende metoder, og der er fremkommet flere nye terapiformer, som baserer sig på de indlæringspsykologiske principper. Adfærdens ABC er en grundbog i klinisk indlæringspsykologi og fungerer som en introduktionstekst til moderne adfærdsterapi. Den præsenterer både klassiske principper for indlæring og nyeste viden om bl.a. sprog og kognition. Alt sættes i et klinisk perspektiv, og igennem bogens mange caseeksempler får læseren en konkret fremstilling af indlæringspsykologisk forankret psykoterapi. Bogen er oplagt til de grundlæggende uddannelser inden for psykologi, psykoterapi og psykiatri.

  • 21.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Törneke, Niklas
    Beteendets ABC - En introduktion till behavioristisk psykoterapi.2006Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Beteendets ABC är en grundbok i klinisk inlärningspsykologi och fungerar som en introduktionstext till modern beteendeterapi. Den presenterar både klassiska principer för inlärning och nyare tankegångar, särskilt vad gäller mänskligt språk och kognition. Allt sätts in i ett kliniskt perspektiv med särskilt fokus på inledande bedömning. Genom att väva in kliniska fall ger boken en konkret framställning av en inlärningspsykologiskt förankrad psykoterapi. Boken är avsedd för grundläggande utbildningar inom psykoterapi, klinisk psykologi och psykiatri men vänder sig också till yrkesverksamma inom psykiatri och relaterade vårdområden.

  • 22.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Törneke, Niklas
    The ABCs of Human Behavior2008Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    When behavior and cognitive therapy mixed into cognitive behavior therapies, largely during the 1980s, cognitive models became dominant and basic behavior principles were largely sidelined in clinical psychology curricula. Issues in cognition became the focus of case conceptualization and intervention planning for most therapists. In recent years there has been a renewed interest in learning theory, and basic behavior principles are once again becoming central in clinical practice. This is especially true in the new "third-wave" behavior therapies which begin to address areas of concern in the cognitive models. If you've been practicing for a while, classical behaviorism may not have been a major part of your clinical education. In order to broaden your understanding of learning theory and make the best use of the newer psychotherapies, you need to revisit basic behavioral principles from a practical angle.

    The ABCs of Human Behavior offers you, the practicing clinician, a solid and practical introduction to the basics of modern behavioral psychology. The book focuses both on the classical principles of learning as well as more recent developments that explain language and cognition in behavioral and contextual terms. These principles are not just discussed in the abstract--rather the book shows how the principles of learning apply in a clinical context. Practical and easy to read, the book walks you through both common sense and clinical examples that will help you use behavioral principles to observe, explain, and influence behavior in a therapeutic setting.

    From the Publisher

    The ABCs of Human Behavior the first book to present modern behavioral psychology to practicing clinicians. The book focuses both on the classical principles of learning, as well as the more recent developments that help explain language and cognition.

  • 23.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Öst, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Panic and avoidance in panic disorder with agoraphobia: Clinical relevance of change in different aspects of the disorder2007In: Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, ISSN 0005-7916, E-ISSN 1873-7943, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different aspects of change were examined in 62 patients who fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for a primary diagnosis of panic disorder with agoraphobia of moderate to severe magnitude, and who were treated with 16 sessions of behavioral therapy. The treatment resulted in substantial effects on panic attacks and agoraphobic avoidance. Panic-free status only differentiated the patients regarding mood at pre- and post-treatment. Changes in panic and avoidance were related to each other, but change in avoidance was more related to change in negative affect. Change in quality of life (QOL) was also more associated with change in avoidance at post-treatment. At follow-up change in QOL was more related to change in panic than change in avoidance.

  • 24.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Öst, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Therapists’ and clients’ perceptions of each other and working alliance in the behavioral treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia2007In: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 320-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty-nine patients who fulfilled criteria for a primary diagnosis of panic disorder with moderate to severe agoraphobia were treated with 16 sessions of behavioral therapy. The study investigated the relationship between therapists' and clients' perception of each other, working alliance, and outcome. There was initially a low correspondence between therapist and client perceptions but a growing consensus during treatment. This was most pronounced regarding high ratings of therapist qualities and the perception of the client as attractive. Clients' perceptions showed virtually zero correlation with outcome regardless of time. Therapist perception of client as showing active participation and goal direction yielded positive correlations with outcome at posttreatment and follow-up from Session 4 and throughout treatment. No significant relation between working alliance and outcome was found apart from the fact that those who improved during follow-up rated the alliance significantly higher than those who did not improve.

  • 25.
    Roll-Pettersson, Lise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Ek, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Ramnerö, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Benefits of BACB Certification for Universities in Europe: A Case Study from Sweden2010In: Association of professional behavior analysts, no 17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The endorsement of the Behaviour Analyst Certification Board (BACB) program by the European Association for Behaviour Analysis and the BACB’s accreditation by the National Council for Certifying Agencies of the Institute for Credentialing Excellence are important factors for professional development and identity from the perspective of European behaviour analysts. Countries within Europe have different ideological and philosophical assumptions concerning important conceptual and practical knowledge for professionals like licensed psychologists and special educators. The conceptual knowledge base in one country might differ from that of another country. Certification in behaviour analysis, however, would clearly indicate that an individual has knowledge and skills in applied behaviour analysis and can apply them in an ethical and accountable manner in practical settings, regardless of the country in which the individual was trained and the academic discipline in which the individual obtained degree or coursework. Thus BACB certification may promote collaboration among countries, and may come to serve as a tie that binds theory and practice across countries as well as disciplines.

1 - 25 of 25
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