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  • 1.
    Agné, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Dellmuth, Lisa Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Does stakeholder involvement foster democratic legitimacy in international organizations? An empirical assessment of a normative theory2015In: The Review of International Organizations, ISSN 1559-7431, E-ISSN 1559-744X, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 465-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The involvement of non-state organizations in global governance is widely seen as an important step toward global democracy. Proponents of "stakeholder democracy" argue that stakeholder organizations, such as civil society groups and other non-state actors, may represent people significantly affected by global decisions better than elected governments. In this article we identify a particularly promising sociological variant of this argument, test it against new evidence from a large-scale survey among stakeholder organizations with varying levels of involvement in international organizations (IOs), and find that the suggested stakeholder mechanism for producing democratic legitimacy in global governance does not work. Stakeholder involvement is unproductive for democratic legitimacy in IOs as perceived by stakeholders themselves. We suggest alternative explanations of this finding and argue that empirical analysis is useful for adjudicating normative arguments on the viability of stakeholder democracy in global governance.

  • 2. Bexell, Magdalena
    et al.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Uhlin, Anders
    Democracy in Global Governance: The Promises and Pitfalls of Transnational Actors2010In: Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations, ISSN 1075-2846, E-ISSN 1942-6720, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 81-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of transnational actors in global policymaking is increasingly seen as a means to democratize global governance. Drawing on alternative theories of democracy and existing empirical evidence, we assess the promises and pitfalls of this vision. We explore how the structuring and operation of international institutions, public-private partnerships, and transnational actors themselves may facilitate expanded participation and enhanced accountability in global governance. We find considerable support for an optimistic verdict on the democratizing potential of transnational actor involvement, but also identify hurdles in democratic theory and the practice of global governance that motivate a more cautious outlook. In conclusion, we call for research that explores the conditions for democracy in global governance through a combination of normative political theory and positive empirical research.

  • 3.
    Dellmuth, Lisa Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Scholte, Jan Aart
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Institutional sources of legitimacy for international organisations: Beyond procedure versus performance2019In: Review of International Studies, ISSN 0260-2105, E-ISSN 1469-9044, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 627-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses a significant gap in the literature on legitimacy in global governance, exploring whether, in what ways, and to what extent institutional qualities of international organisations (IOs) matter for popular legitimacy beliefs towards these bodies. The study assesses the causal significance of procedure and performance as sources of legitimacy, unpacks these dimensions into specific institutional qualities, and offers a comparative analysis across IOs in three issue areas of global governance. Theoretically, the article disaggregates institutional sources of legitimacy to consider democratic, technocratic, and fair qualities of procedure and performance. Empirically, it examines the effects of these institutional qualities through a population-based survey experiment in four countries in different world regions with respect to IOs in economic, security, and climate governance. The findings demonstrate that both procedure- and performance-related aspects of IO policymaking matter for popular legitimacy beliefs. This result holds across democratic, technocratic, and fair qualities of IO procedure and performance. Disaggregating the results by issue area indicates that a broader scope of institutional qualities are important for legitimacy beliefs in economic governance compared to security governance and, especially, climate governance. These findings suggest that propositions to reduce the institutional sources of IO legitimacy to single specific qualities would be misguided.

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  • 4.
    Dellmuth, Lisa Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Advocacy Strategies in Global Governance: Inside versus Outside Lobbying2017In: Political Studies, ISSN 0032-3217, E-ISSN 1467-9248, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 705-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As political authority shifts to the global level, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) increasingly attempt to influence policy-making within international organisations (IOs). This article examines the nature and sources of non-governmental organisations’ advocacy strategies in global governance. We advance a twofold theoretical argument. First, non-governmental organisation advocacy can be described in terms of inside and outside strategies, similar to interest group lobbying in American and European politics. Second, non-governmental organisations’ chosen combination of inside and outside strategies can be explained by their organisational goals and membership base. Empirically, this argument is corroborated through a large-n analysis of original data from structured interviews with 303 non-governmental organisation representatives active in relation to the United Nations (UN), complemented by 19 semi-structured interviews with UN and state officials. The article’s findings have implications for the theory and practice of non-governmental organisation involvement in global governance.

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  • 5.
    Dellmuth, Lisa Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The social legitimacy of international organisations: Interest representation, institutional performance, and confidence extrapolation in the United Nations2015In: Review of International Studies, ISSN 0260-2105, E-ISSN 1469-9044, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 451-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social legitimacy is central to the effectiveness of international organisations (IOs). Yet, so far, we have little systematic knowledge about what drives citizens to support or oppose IOs. In this article, we isolate and assess three alternative explanations of social legiti- macy in global governance, privileging interest representation, institutional performance, and confidence extrapolation. We test these theories in a multilevel analysis of citizen confidence in the United Nations (UN) using World Values Survey and European Values Study data, sup- plemented by contextual measures. The results grant support to the arguments that institu- tional performance and confidence extrapolation shape popular confidence in the UN, while offering little support for the explanation of interest representation. These findings challenge the predominant understanding that more democratic procedures lead to greater social legitimacy for IOs. Instead, the UN case suggests that the social legitimacy of IOs is based primarily on the organisations’ capacity to deliver, as well as on citizens’ general confidence in political institutions, which IOs may have little to do with and can do little to change.

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  • 6.
    Dellmuth, Lisa Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Why national and international legitimacy beliefs are linked: Social trust as an antecedent factor2020In: The Review of International Organizations, ISSN 1559-7431, E-ISSN 1559-744X, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 311-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent public opinion research has established an empirical regularity of unusual stability and strength: citizen beliefs in the legitimacy of national and international institutions are highly linked. The dominant interpretation of this link holds that citizens draw on their perceptions of national institutions as a heuristic when forming opinions about international institutions. This article proposes an alternative mechanism, privileging social trust as an antecedent factor contributing to both national and international legitimacy beliefs. Using original survey data on citizen attitudes toward four international institutions in three countries, the article provides evidence for social trust as an antecedent factor, while granting no support for the dominant interpretation. The article suggests three broader implications: social trust has more far-reaching consequences for international cooperation than previously understood; political efforts to affect the legitimacy of international institutions are constrained by individual predispositions; and a comparative approach is central to the study of public attitudes toward international institutions.

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  • 7.
    Galaz, Victor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Boin, Arjen
    Ituarte-Lima, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hey, Ellen
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Westley, Frances
    Global Governance Dimensions of Globally Networked Risks: The State of the Art in Social Science Research2017In: Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, ISSN 1944-4079, E-ISSN 1944-4079, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 4-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global risks are now increasingly being perceived as networked, and likely to result in large-scale, propagating failures and crises that transgress national boundaries and societal sectors. These so called globally networked risks pose fundamental challenges to global governance institutions. A growing literature explores the nature of these globally networked or systemic risks. While this research has taught us much about the anatomy of these risks, it has consistently failed to integrate insights from the wider social sciences. This is problematic since the prescriptions that result from these efforts flow from naive assumptions about the way real-world state and non-state actors behave in the international arena. This leaves serious gaps in our understanding of whether networked environmental risks at all can be governed. The following essay brings together decades of research by different disciplines in the social sciences, and identifies five multi-disciplinary key insights that can inform global approaches to governing these. These insights include the influence of international institutions; the dynamics and effect of international norms and legal mechanisms; the need for international institutions to cope with transboundary and cross-sectoral crises; the role of innovation as a strategy to handle unpredictable global risks; and the necessity to address legitimacy issues.

  • 8. Gustavsson, Jakob
    et al.
    Tallberg, JonasStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Internationella relationer2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 9. Johansson, Karl Magnus
    et al.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Explaining Chief Executive Empowerment: EU Summitry and Domestic Institutional Change2010In: West European Politics, ISSN 0140-2382, E-ISSN 1743-9655, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 208-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article questions the claim that the way German governments have responded to Muslim demands for accommodating Islam fits a German national model. The empirical focus is on Islamic religious instruction in five German Lander. The evidence presented shows that there is not one but several German models. Lander with Christian Democratic dominance were more supportive of confessional religious instruction than Lander where the left was stronger. At the same time Christian Democrats initially were more reluctant to extend the privilege of religious instruction to Muslim groups. In Lander where Article 7 III of the German constitution applied, corporatist hurdles were an obstacle for Muslim groups, but this was less the case in Berlin. Religion-state institutions are important for understanding how European countries have dealt with the growing presence of Islam, but it is equally important to understand the politically contested nature of these institutions.

  • 10.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bailer, Stefanie
    Dellmuth, Lisa M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Târlea, Silvana
    Bargaining success in the reform of the Eurozone2019In: European Union Politics, ISSN 1465-1165, E-ISSN 1741-2757, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 65-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides a systematic assessment of bargaining success in the reform of the Eurozone 2010 to 2015. Theoretically, we develop an argument about preferences and institutions as determinants of bargaining success and contrast this argument with an alternative account privileging states’ power resources. Empirically, we conduct a statistical analysis of new data covering all key reform proposals. Our findings are three-fold. First, contrary to a conventional narrative of German dominance, the negotiations produced no clear winners and losers. Second, while power resources were of limited importance, holding preferences that were centrist or close to the European Commission favored bargaining success—particularly when adoption only required the support of a qualified majority. Third, these descriptive and explanatory results reflect dynamics of compromise and reciprocity.

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  • 11.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Squatrito, Theresa
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Stability and change in international policy-making: A punctuated equilibrium approach2018In: The Review of International Organizations, ISSN 1559-7431, E-ISSN 1559-744X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 547-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International organizations (IOs) have developed into important policy venues beyond the state. Yet our understanding of the broader dynamics of IO policy-making is limited. This article offers the first comparative analysis of macro patterns in IO policy-making. Theoretically, we draw on punctuated equilibrium theory to develop hypotheses about stability and change in the orientation of IO policy agendas. Empirically, we examine novel data on the policy output of five general-purpose IOs between 1980 and 2015, combining statistical analysis and comparative case illustrations. The analysis yields two central results. First, the policy agendas of all five IOs display patterns of punctuated equilibria, with longer periods of stability interrupted by shorter periods of dramatic change. Second, the level of institutional friction in decision-making contributes to variation in punctuations across IOs and within IOs over time. The results suggest four broader implications: (1) punctuated equilibrium theory applies to a broader empirical domain than previously thought; (2) patterns of change in IOs are more complex than conventionally expected; (3) institutional friction matters for IOs’ responsiveness to societal demands and problem pressures; and (4) deeper integration of punctuated equilibrium theory into the study of IOs can pave the way for a promising IR research agenda.

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  • 12.
    Sommerer, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Diffusion across International Organizations: Connectivity and Convergence2019In: International Organization, ISSN 0020-8183, E-ISSN 1531-5088, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 399-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While extensive research shows that policies and institutions spread across states through processes of diffusion, we know little about diffusion among international organizations (IOs). This article advances the state of the field by developing a novel approach for the study ofdiffusion among IOs. This approach consists of three components: a theoretical focus onconnectivity among IOs as pathways for diffusion; a conceptual differentiation between alternative types of convergence effects; and a methodological strategy combining dyadic and spatial analysis of diffusion. The article illustrates the usefulness of this approach through an empirical case: the diffusion of participatory governance arrangements among IOs, 1970-2010. The analysis shows that connectivity among IOs contributes to convergence, which typically is manifested through imitation of very specific institutional models. The article has implications both for the study of IOs and for the general study of diffusion.

  • 13.
    Sommerer, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Transnational Access to International Organizations 1950-2010: A New Dataset2017In: International Studies Perspectives, ISSN 1528-3577, E-ISSN 1528-3585, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 247-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article introduces a new dataset on the access of transnational actors (TNAs) to international organizations (IOs). While IOs were long the exclusive preserve of member governments, the past decades have witnessed a shift toward more inclusive forms of governance, involving participation by non-governmental organizations, philanthropic foundations, multinational corporations, and other forms of TNAs. Yet existing research has lacked the data necessary to map this phenomenon and its variation over dimensions such as time, issue areas, and world regions. The TRANSACCESS dataset is designed for this purpose, and contains information on the level of openness in 298 bodies of 50 IOs from 1950 to 2010. On the basis of this dataset, we also introduce a first quantitative measure of institutional openness, in the shape of a composite index, available at both IO and body level. This index can be used to compare TNA access across and within IOs, but also as a variable in large-N studies on global and regional governance where IO openness is potentially relevant.

  • 14. Squatrito, Theresa
    et al.
    Sommerer, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Transnational Access to International Organizations, 1950–2010: Structural Factors and Critical Junctures2016In: Historical Institutionalism and International Relations: Explaining Institutional Development in World Politics / [ed] Thomas Rixen, Lora Anne Viola, Michael Zürn, Oxford University Press, 2016, p. 165-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The institutional designs of international organizations (IOs) are notoriously resistant to reform. Nevertheless, we have witnessed a dramatic transformation of international organizations, from interstate cooperation toward more complex forms of governance, involving participation by transnational actors (TNAs). This chapter maps the speed, scope, and depth of institutional change in TNA access. Combining descriptive statistics with case studies, the chapter explains the dynamics of institutional change that we observe. The chapter argues that the process of change has been driven by two structural factors—deepening cooperation and domestic democratization—in combination with the end of the Cold War as a critical juncture. The end of the Cold War triggered the temporal intersection of these two structural factors, separating an early period of slow and incremental growth in openness from a later period of rapid and profound expansion of TNA access.

  • 15.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bargaining Power in the European Council2008In: Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 46, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    EU efter utvidgningen: farhågor, framgångar och framtidsfrågor2010In: En statsvetares olika sfärer: en vänbok till Daniel Tarschys / [ed] Tommy Möller & Olof Ruin, Stockholm: Hjalmarson & Högberg , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    European governance and supranational institutions: making states comply2003Book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Europeiseringen av Norge i ett jämförande perspektiv: The Europeanization of Norway in a Comparative Perspective2012In: Internasjonal Politikk, ISSN 0020-577X, E-ISSN 1891-1757, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 287-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on Europeanization clearly shows that membership in the European Union over time affects the national political systems of member states. Given Norway’s extensive integration within the EU, it is relevant and important to assess whether and, if so, how the Norwegian political system, too, has changed as a result, and how these effects compare with the general patterns among EU member states. Exploring the Europeanization of Norway in a comparative perspective, the article maps the effects of European integration for four central power relationships in the Norwegian political system: national-supranational authority, executive-legislative-judicial authority, political-administrative authority and national-regional authority. It is demonstrated that integration within the EU to a large extent has had the same effects in Norway as in the member states of the EU, despite Norway’s alternative form of affiliation: extensive delegation of power to the supranational level, strengthening of the government in relation to the parliament, an increasingly important role for national courts, expanded power and autonomy of the executive administration in relation to the political leadership, and some strengthening of the regions vis-à-vis the central government.

  • 19.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    EU:s politiska system2013 (ed. 5)Book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    EU:s politiska system2004Book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Explaining the institutional foundations of European Union negotiations2010In: Journal of European Public Policy, ISSN 1350-1763, E-ISSN 1466-4429, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 633-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European Union (EU) negotiations take place within the framework of a set of formal and informal institutions. Member states negotiate in the organizational context of the Council and the European Council, take decisions through alternative procedures and decision rules, and sustain a set of norms for the conduct of negotiations. While the effects of these institutions on negotiation behaviour and outcomes have received extensive attention, the question of why these particular institutions have been established or evolved remains underexplored. This contribution makes an argument in favour of systematic attention to the design of negotiation institutions in the EU, and suggests that we should draw on general theoretical approaches to institutional design for these purposes. Moreover, rather than engaging in the exercise of trying to prove or falsify theoretical approaches, we should exploit the potential for explanatory complementarities in concrete empirical domains. To this end, the paper advances a domain-of-application approach to institutional design and illustrates its applicability to EU negotiation institutions through four empirical illustrations.

  • 22.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Explaining the Institutional Foundations of European Union Negotiations2010In: Negotiation Theory and the EU: The State of the Art / [ed] Andreas Dür, Gemma Mateo & Daniel Thomas, London: Routledge , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Formal Leadership by the Council Presidency2008In: Games Governments Play in Brussels: Unveiling the Council of the European Union, Palgrave Macmillan , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Global stakeholder democracy: a reality-check2012In: Comparison, quotas and critical change: in honor of Drude Dahlerup / [ed] Lenita Freidenvall och Michele Micheletti, Stockholm: Department of Political Science, zStockholm University , 2012, p. 185-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    När Europa kom till Sverige: ordförandeskapet i EU 20012001Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Orchestrating enforcement: international organizations mobilizing compliance constituencies2015In: International Organizations as Orchestrators / [ed] Kenneth W. Abbott et al., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015, p. 166-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most broadly shared conclusion in scholarship on dispute settlement, legalization and compliance over the past two decades is probably the virtue of granting private actors access to international courts and tribunals. Yet for all its benefits, private access is not a universally available and effective institutional design option. This chapter shows that IGOs sometimes compensate for these limits by turning to a strategy of orchestration, and identifies the conditions under which this takes place. Where procedures for private enforcement are lacking, orchestration can offer a substitute, as when IGOs independently create mechanisms for compliance complaints. Where such procedures exist but private actors face resource barriers, orchestration can offer a complement, as when IGOs provide funding and training to potential litigants. This chapter argues that orchestration of enforcement in both its variants will only happen when three necessary conditions are fulfilled: a) IGOs lack sufficient capabilities to effectively enforce compliance through other governance means; b) private actors hold privileged information about state compliance; and c) IGOs enjoy a capacity for independent action, as shaped by entrepreneurial resources and state oversight.

  • 27.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The Power of the Chair: Formal Leadership in International Cooperation2010In: International Studies Quarterly, ISSN 0020-8833, E-ISSN 1468-2478, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 241-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the influence wielded by the formal leaders of international cooperation-those state or supranational representatives that chair and direct negotiations in the major decision bodies of multilateral organizations and conferences. This is a topic that so far has received limited systematic attention by IR theorists, who have tended to treat bargaining parties as functionally and formally equivalent, leaving little theoretical space for formal leadership. Drawing on rational choice institutionalism, I introduce a theory that develops a coherent argument for the delegation of authority to the chairmanship, the power resources of negotiation chairs, and the influence of formal leaders over outcomes. I assess the explanatory power of this theory through evidence on formal leadership in three alternative organizational settings: the European Union, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade/the World Trade Organization, and the United Nations environmental conferences. I find in favor of the chairmanship as a source of independent influence in international cooperation. Formal leaders perform functions of agenda management, brokerage, and representation that make it more likely for negotiations to succeed, and possess privileged resources that may enable them to steer negotiations toward the agreements they most prefer.

  • 28.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Transnational Access to International Institutions: Three Approaches2010In: Transnational Actors in Global Governance: Patterns, Explanations, and Implications / [ed] Christer Jönsson & Jonas Tallberg, Basingstoke: Palgrave , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Transparency2016In: The Oxford Handbook of International Organizations / [ed] Jacob Katz Cogan, Ian Hurd, Ian Johnstone, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Vem har makten i Europa2013In: Statsvetenskapens frågor / [ed] Li Bennich-Björkman, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, p. 154-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Dellmuth, Lisa M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    NGO Influence in International Organizations: Information, Access, and Exchange2018In: British Journal of Political Science, ISSN 0007-1234, E-ISSN 1469-2112, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 213-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is broad consensus that non-governmental organizations (NGOs) sometimes succeed in influencing policy-making within international organizations (IOs), there is much less agreement on the factors and conditions that make NGO lobbying effective. In this article, we make two contributions to this debate. First, we examine the determinants of influence among NGOs active in different IOs, issue areas, and policy phases. The analysis builds on original survey data of more than 400 NGOs involved in five different IOs, complemented by elite interviews with IO and state officials. Second, we advance a specific argument about how the strategic exchange of information and access between NGOs and IOs increases NGO influence in IOs. We contrast this argument, derived from theories of lobbying in American and European politics, with three alternative explanations of NGO influence, privileging material resources, transnational networks, and public-opinion mobilization, and sketch the broader implications of our results for research on NGOs in global governance.

  • 32.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Johansson, Karl Magnus
    Party Politics in the European Council2008In: Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 15, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Jönsson, Christer
    Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Transnational Access:  Findings and Future Research2010In: Transnational Actors in Global Governance: Patterns, Explanations, and Implications / [ed] Christer Jönsson & Jonas Tallberg, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Jönsson, Christer
    Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Transnational Actor Participation in International Institutions: Where, Why, and with What Consequences?2010In: Transnational Actors in Global Governance: Patterns, Explanations, and Implications / [ed] Christer Jönsson & Jonas Tallberg, Basingstoke: Palgrave , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Jönsson, ChristerStatsvetenskapliga institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Transnational Actors in Global Governance: Patterns, Explanations, and Implications2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Palme, Joakim
    Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Aylott, Nicholas
    Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Södertörns högskola.
    Casula Vifell, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Europeiseringen av Sverige2010Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Smith, James McCall
    Dispute Settlement in World Politics: States, Supranational Prosecutors, and Compliance2014In: European Journal of International Relations, ISSN 1354-0661, E-ISSN 1460-3713, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 118-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses one prominent expression of the interplay between politics and law in international cooperation: the dynamics of bargaining in the settling of compliance disputes. Our central argument is that the formal structure of dispute settlement systematically shapes the likelihood and terms of negotiated compliance settlements. We introduce an ideal type distinction between interstate dispute settlement, where the authority to sue states for non-compliance resides exclusively with states, and supranational dispute settlement, where this authority is partly or entirely delegated to a commission or secretariat with a prosecutorial function. We hypothesize that systems relying on supranational prosecution are more effective in addressing noncompliance, and more likely to mediate the impact of power asymmetries on dispute settlement outcomes, compared to systems relying on state-initiated complaints only. We find support for this proposition in an in-depth comparison of dispute settlement and compliance bargaining in the World Trade Organization and the European Union, and in a brief survey of experiences from other international organizations.

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    TallbergSmithEJIR
  • 38.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sommerer, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Squatrito, Theresa
    Democratic Memberships in International Organizations: Sources of Institutional Design2016In: The Review of International Organizations, ISSN 1559-7431, E-ISSN 1559-744X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 59-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestic regime type has emerged a powerful explanation of multiple phenomena in world politics. This article extends this argument to the design of international organizations (IOs), where a profound development in recent decades is growing access for transnational actors (TNAs). While earlier research has shown that democracy in IO memberships helps to explain IO openness, we know little about the mechanisms that drive this effect. This article unpacks the relationship between democratic memberships and IO design by theorizing and assessing the impact of three different constellations of democracies on the openness of IOs. Empirically, we conduct a multivariate analysis of TNA access to 50 IOs from 1950 to 2010, combined with a case study of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe. Our main findings are three-fold. First, democracy’s effect on openness is primarily a product of the combined weight of democracies within IOs and their resulting capacity to secure support for their polity preferences. Second, in contrast, we only find limited support for a specific influence of new democracies and democratic major powers on IO openness. Third, decision rules that allow for openness reforms to be adopted by a majority of member states facilitate and strengthen the influence of democracies, by reducing the ability of autocracies to block change. The findings have implications for our understanding of institutional design in global governance and democracy’s effects in world politics.

  • 39.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sommerer, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Squatrito, Theresa
    Jönsson, Christer
    Explaining the Transnational Design of International Organizations2014In: International Organization, ISSN 0020-8183, E-ISSN 1531-5088, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 741-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Past decades have witnessed a shift in international cooperation toward growing involvement of transnational actors (TNAs), such as non-governmental organizations, multinational corporations, and philanthropic foundations. This article offers a comprehensive theoretical and empirical account of TNA access to IOs. The analysis builds on a novel dataset, covering formal TNA access to 298 organizational bodies from 50 IOs over the time period 1950 to 2010. We identify the most profound patterns in TNA access across time, issue areas, policy functions, and world regions, and statistically test competing explanations of the variation in TNA access. The central results are three-fold. First, the empirical data confirm the existence of a far-reaching institutional transformation of IOs over the past sixty years, pervading all issue areas, policy functions, and world regions. Second, variation in TNA access within and across IOs is mainly explained by a combination of three factors: functional demand for the resources of TNAs, domestic democratic standards in the membership of IOs, and state concerns with national sovereignty. Third, existing research suffers from a selection bias that has led it to overestimate the general importance of a new participatory norm in global governance for the openness of IOs.

  • 40.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sommerer, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Squatrito, Theresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Jönsson, Christer
    The opening up of international organizations: transnational access in global governance2013Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Once the exclusive preserve of member states, international organizations have become increasingly open in recent decades. Now virtually all international organizations at some level involve NGOs, business actors and scientific experts in policy-making. This book offers the first systematic and comprehensive analysis of this development. Combining statistical analysis and in-depth case studies, it maps and explains the openness of international organizations across issue areas, policy functions and world regions from 1950 to 2010. Addressing the question of where, how and why international organizations offer transnational actors access to global policy-making, this book has implications for critical issues in world politics. When do states share authority with private actors? What drives the design of international organizations? How do activists and businesses influence global politics? Is civil society involvement a solution to democratic deficits in global governance?

  • 41.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sommerer, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Squatrito, Theresa
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The performance of international organizations: a policy output approach2016In: Journal of European Public Policy, ISSN 1350-1763, E-ISSN 1466-4429, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 1077-1096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many problems confronting today’s societies are transnational in character, leading states to increasingly rely on international organizations (IOs) for policy solutions. Yet the performance of IOs varies extensively. As an initial step toward explaining variation in IO performance, this article discusses how performance may best be conceptualized for empirical analysis. We advance an output-based account of IO performance, privileging the results IOs produce in terms of policy output. This conceptualization is distinct from the main alternative perspectives on IO performance, emphasizing either behavioral change by targets (policy outcome) or problem-solving effectiveness (policy impact). In addition, we introduce a typology of output that captures five generic features of IO policy of theoretical importance: policy volume, orientation, type, instrument, and target. We conclude by highlighting the implications of an output-based account to IO performance for the study of institutional design and effectiveness in global governance.

  • 42.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Squatrito, Theresa
    Sommerer, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Explaining Patterns in IO Openness: Governance Problems, Policy Approaches, and Institutional Design2014In: Politische Vierteljahresschrift, ISSN 0032-3470, E-ISSN 1862-2860, no 49, p. 370-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While international organizations (IOs) in recent decades have expanded the opportunities for transnational actors (TNAs) to participate in policy-making, significant differences remain across and within IOs. We argue that a neglected source of variation in openness is the policy approaches of IOs, understood as organizational styles of problem-solving. Policy approaches matter because one and the same governance problem may be tackled in multiple ways. Based on a descriptive statistical analysis and two case studies (Asian Development Bank, Commonwealth), we show that IOs which pursue a centralized approach to problem solving are less likely to involve TNAs than IOs that pursue a decentralized policy approach.

  • 43.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Uhlin, Anders
    Lunds universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Civil society and global democracy: an assessment2012In: Global democracy: normative and empirical perspectives / [ed] Daniele Archibugi, Mathias Koenig-Archibugi and Raffaele Marchetti, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012, p. 210-232Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Civil society actors are increasingly seen as holding the promise of a democratization of global governance. Rejecting confederal and federal blueprints for global democracy, a number of theorists in recent years have advanced models for how to democratize existing institutional arrangements through the involvement of civil society actors. In this chapter, we assess the empirical viability of this normative vision, varyingly referred to as global stakeholder democracy, transnational democracy, and democratic polycentrism. This chapter thereby seeks to advance a new agenda in research on global democracy, informed by the ambition to explore the empirical preconditions of alternative theoretical models. We conclude that existing procedures and practices in global governance fall short of fulfilling the normative proposals in the vision of democratic polycentrism, but may qualify as a step in a long-term process of democratization toward this vision.

  • 44. Târlea, Silvana
    et al.
    Bailer, Stefanie
    Degner, Hanno
    Dellmuth, Lisa M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Leuffen, Dirk
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Wasserfallen, Fabio
    Explaining governmental preferences on Economic and Monetary Union Reform2019In: European Union Politics, ISSN 1465-1165, E-ISSN 1741-2757, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 24-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the extent to which economic or political factors shaped government preferences in the reform of the Economic Monetary Union. A multilevel analysis of European Union member governments’ preferences on 40 EMU reform issues negotiated between 2010 and 2015 suggests that countries’ financial sector exposure has significant explanatory power. Seeking to minimize the risk of costly bailouts, countries with highly exposed financial sectors were more likely to support solutions involving high degrees of European integration. In contrast, political factors had no systematic impact. These findings help to enhance our understanding of preference formation in the European Union and the viability of future EMU reform.

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