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  • 1.
    Boman, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Upptäck Neapelbukten2013In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Att upptäcka antiken: Recensioner av Stephen L. Dyson, In pursuit of ancient pasts. A history of Classical Archaeology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, New Haven och London 2006, och Great moments in Greek archaeology, red. Panos Valavanis, Los Angeles 20072009In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 4, p. 38-43Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Cymbalspelande satyrer: Ett populärt motiv bland restauratörer av antik skulptur2009In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. -, no 3, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Spelar han cymbaler, eller kanske flöjt? Förvirringen kan bli stor när man tittar närmare på antika skulpturer som restaurerats. Följ med på upptäcktsfärd bland (till synes) cymbalspelande satyrer!

  • 4.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Dancing with decorum: The eclectic usage of kalathiskos dancers and pyrrhic dancers in Roman visual culture2012In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 5, p. 7-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines two groups of motifs in Roman visual culture: females modelled on kalathiskos dancers, and males modelled on pyrrhic dancers. Eclecticism is emphasized as a strategy which was used to introduce novelties that were appropriate within a Roman cultural context. The figures representing kalathiskos dancers and pyrrhic dancers were both changed in an eclectic manner and this resulted in motifs representing the goddess Victoria, and the curetes respectively.

    Kalathiskos dancers and eclectic Victoriae figure on many different media at least from the Augustan era and into the 2nd century AD. It is argued here that the establishment of these two motifs in Roman visual culture is closely related to the aesthetics which came to the fore during the reign of Augustus. Thereafter, both kalathiskos dancers and eclectic Victoriae lingered on in the Roman cultural context until many of the material categories on which they were depicted ceased to be produced.

    Unlike the kalathiskos dancers, the male figures modelled on pyrrhic dancers are so rare within Roman visual culture that we can only assume they were, to some extent, perceived as an inappropriate motif. This can most likely be explained by the negative attitude, amongst the Roman elite, towards male dancing.

  • 5.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Dancing with decorum: The eclectic uses of kalathiskos dancers in Roman visual culture2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Den ofrivillige cymbalspelaren: En satyrskulpturs genomslag i tid och rum2011In: Okonstlad konst: Om äkthet och autenticitet i estetisk teori och praktik / [ed] Axel Englund, Anna Jörngården, Lindome: Symposion Brutus Östlings bokförlag, 2011, p. 87-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    En pompejansk Medusa2013In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 36-36Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Ett mystiskt moln över Medelhavet2010In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 2, p. 28-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Evading Greek models: Three studies on Roman visual culture2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For a long time, Roman ideal sculptures have primarily been studied within the tradition of Kopienkritik. Owing to some of the theoretical assumptions tied to this practice, several important aspects of Roman visual culture have been neglected as the overall aim of such research has been to gain new knowledge regarding assumed Classical and Hellenistic models. This thesis is a collection of three studies on Roman ideal sculpture. The articles share three general aims: 1. To show that the practice of Kopienkritik has, so far, not produced convincing interpretations of the sculpture types and motifs discussed. 2. To show that aspects of the methodology tied to the practice of Kopienkritik (thorough examination and comparison of physical forms in sculptures) can, and should, be used to gain insights other than those concerning hypothetical Classical and Hellenistic model images. 3. To present new interpretations of the sculpture types and motifs studied, interpretations which emphasize their role and importance within Roman visual culture.

    The first article shows that reputed, post-Antique restorations may have an unexpected—and unwanted—impact on the study of ancient sculptures. This is examined by tracing the impact that a restored motif ("Satyrs with cymbals") has had on the study of an ancient sculpture type: the satyr ascribed to the two-figure group "The invitation to the dance". The second article presents and interprets a sculpture type which had previously gone unnoticed—The satyrs of "The Palazzo Massimo-type". The type is interpreted as a variant of "The Marsyas in the forum", a motif that was well known within the Roman cultural context. The third article examines how, and why, two motifs known from Classical models were changed in an eclectic fashion once they had been incorporated into Roman visual culture. The motifs concerned are kalathiskos dancers, which were transformed into Victoriae, and pyrrhic dancers, which were also reinterpreted as mythological figures—the curetes.

  • 10.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Färgsprakande höst på Medelhavsmuseet2010In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 3, p. 41-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Graciöst vapenskrammel: Beväpnade, manliga dansare i romersk bildvärld2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Hösten på Medelhavsmuseet2006In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 3, p. 28-29Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Intertextualitet och romersk visuell kultur: Ett nytt angreppssätt för romersk idealskulptur2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Projektets grundläggande forskningsfråga rör idealskulpturens roll inom den romerska världen. Sedan 1800-talets mitt har sådana skulpturer i första hand studerats som romerska kopior efter grekiska original, utifrån den kopiekritiska metoden. Men under de senaste tjugo åren har kopiekritikens dominerande ställning kritiserats upprepade gånger. Kritiken rör framför allt det faktum att metoden inte tar i beaktande skulpturernas roll inom den romerska kulturella kontexten. Men trots kritiken har inget annat angreppsätt ännu lyckats konkurrera med kopiekritiken. Detta projekt syftar till att formulera ett nytt angreppssätt för studiet av dessa fascinerande skulpturer, en metod som har en stor potential att ge nya insikter beträffande idealskulpturens plats i det romerska samhället. Det nya angreppssättet utgår ifrån konceptet intertextualitet, och det introducerar således också ett teoretiskt och tvärvetenskapligt element till den aktuella debatten om hur romerska idealskulpturer bör tolkas.

  • 14.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Intertextuality and Roman visual culture: A new approach to Roman ideal sculpture2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this project is to acquire new knowledge regarding the role of ideal sculpture in the Roman world. Since the mid-19th century, such sculptures have been studied primarily as Roman copies of Greek originals, using the method of copy criticism. During the last two decades, the dominating influence of this approach has been repeatedly criticized as it does not investigate the place of such sculptures in the Roman cultural context. Yet, no alternative approach has managed to rival that of copy criticism. This project aims to formulate a new mode of studying this fascinating material, an approach that has great potential to produce new insights into the role of ideal sculptures in Roman society. Turning to the concept of intertextuality, this project also aims to introduce a theoretical and multidisciplinary element to the current debate on how to interpret Roman ideal sculpture.

  • 15.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Kunst von unten? Stil und Gesellschaft in der antiken Welt von der "arte plebea" bis heute (Palilia, 27), eds. Francesco de Angelis, Jens-Arne Dickmann, Felix Pirson and Ralf von den Hoff, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Rom. Wiesbaden 2012. 184 pp. ISBN 978-3-89500-915-02014In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 7, p. 246-248Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Liv och rörelse: Neapelbuktens infrastruktur2013In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 25-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Marsyas in the garden?: Small-scale sculptures referring to the Marsyas in the forum2010In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 3, p. 163-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While studying a small-scale sculpture in the collections of the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, I noticed that it belongs to a previously unrecognized sculpture type. The type depicts a paunchy, bearded satyr who stands with one arm raised. To my knowledge, four replicas exist. By means of stylistic comparison, they can be dated to the late second to early third centuries AD. Due to their scale and rendering they are likely to have been freestanding decorative elements in Roman villas or gardens.

    The iconography of the satyrs of the type discussed is closely related to that of a group of fountain figures. These fountain figures are believed to refer to a motif well known in Roman times: the Marsyas in the forum. In this article I argue that the satyrs of the type discussed refer as well to this once famous depiction of Marsyas.

  • 18.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Marsyas Unbound2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the presentation of the workshop "Reading emotions in ancient visual culture" the following question is posed: "Why was the agonizing sculpture of Marsyas about to be flayed so popular in the early Roman empire?" This paper will suggest an answer to this question. I wish to emphasize that there was an alternative version of the myth of Marsyas, one where he manages to escape the cruel fate that Apollo had set out for him. Instead, Marsyas settled in Italy, where his image was later to be placed in Roman fora as a symbol of liberty. I will suggest that there was a Roman tradition of depicting Marsyas "unbound" - after having escaped from Apollo and arrived in Italy. Agonizing as the depictions of the hanging Marsyas are, in a Roman context they were perhaps not necessarily seen to represent the final hours of Marsyas' life.

  • 19.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Medusa i Helsingfors2008In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 3, p. 26-26Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Medusa till salu i Tübingen2014In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 49-49Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Mer än bara grävning: Kalaureia-projektets många ansikten2010In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 4, p. 1-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Undersökningar av arkeologiska lämningar omfattar naturligtvis utgrävningar, men i dagens läge är arkeologernas åtagande ofta mer omfattande än så. I samband med utforskningen av Poseidons helgedom på Kalaureia anordnas till exempel utställningar, konserter och olivskördar. Läs mer om ett modernt fältprojekts många ansikten.

  • 22.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Metropol-Palais: En dold skönhet i centrala Stockholm2007In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 4, p. 16-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Människor och makt: Neapelbuktens politiska historia2013In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 3-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    "...nach Kräften treue Kopien der alten Meisterwerke.": Friedrich Hauser and the neo-Attic reliefs2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Piscina mirabilis2010In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 3, p. 42-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    På vulkanisk mark2013In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 37-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Recension av E. Tengström, Broar till antiken. Antikens inflytande på svenskt samhälls- och kulturliv 1780-1850, Göteborg 2014, 252 s.2014In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 39-42Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The impact of restoration: The example of "The dancing satyr" in the Uffizi2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The impact of restoration: The example of the dancing satyr in the Uffizi2012In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 5, p. 133-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to show that reputed restorations may have an unexpected impact on the study of ancient sculpture. During the 17th-19th centuries a number of restored antiques where held in exceptionally high regard. One of the consequences of their renowned was the production of copies and adaptations in different scales and media. Such reproductions did not distinguish between the ancient and the restored parts of the work.

    Today these reproductions are centuries old, and in many cases their provenance has long since been forgotten. Therefore, such post-antique sculptures are easily misinterpreted as ancient. Subsequently, they are at times used as evidence of ancient sculptural production. Needless to say, this may cause flawed notions of Classical sculpture.

    The complexity of this relationship, between the ancient and the restored, is here exemplified by tracing the impact that a restored motif – “satyrs with cymbals” – has had on the study of an ancient sculpture type – the satyr attributed to “The invitation to the dance”.

1 - 29 of 29
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