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  • 1.
    Atak, Kivanc
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Prevention, facilitation and the fortress of the transnational: Policing public demonstrations in Europe2016In: Juridikum (Wien), ISSN 1019-5394, E-ISSN 2309-7477, no 4, 484-493 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Atak, Kivanc
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Bayram, Ismail Emre
    Protest Policing alla Turca: Threat, Insurgency, and the Repression of Pro-Kurdish Protests in Turkey2017In: Social Forces, ISSN 0037-7732, E-ISSN 1534-7605, Vol. 95, no 4, 1667-1694 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do certain protests prompt more intervention from the police? And why does the intensity of intervention vary over time? Drawing on analytical approaches in the protest policing literature, and on studies investigating the relationship between civil conflict, public opinion, and state repression, this study examines whether pro-Kurdish events in Turkey are treated more severely than others, and how the policing of these protests changes over time. Based on an original dataset, we analyze more than 10,000 protest events that took place in Turkey between 2000 and 2009. Our findings suggest that compared to others, pro-Kurdish events are more likely to encounter police action, one that particularly involves repressive strategies. We further show that repressive policing in pro-Kurdish events is more pronounced when the Kurdish armed insurgency against the state intensifies. Given that this is the first systematic quantitative study on protest policing in Turkey, it not only tests previously confirmed theories of protest policing, but also makes a theoretical contribution by providing a dynamic notion of threat beyond its situational forms, which builds on the conflict between the Turkish state and the PKK.

  • 3.
    Atak, Kivanc
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    della Porta, Donatella
    Popular uprisings in Turkey: Police culpability and constraints on dialogue-oriented policing in Gezi Park and beyond2016In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 13, no 5, 610-625 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The policing of riots and uprisings poses severe challenges to the police. Yet the police are often culpable in the disturbances touched off by a precipitating incident of police violence or a crackdown on a peaceful protest. The Gezi Park uprisings in Turkey also broke out shortly after excessive force by the Istanbul police against a handful of peaceful activists in Taksim Square. In the aftermath of the mobilizations, however, a drift towards a ‘zero-tolerance’ approach has prevailed over protest control strategies. Drawing on field notes, interviews with activists, excerpts from the news media, protest event analysis and secondary literature, we argue that the chances of dialogue-oriented policing are hampered by two major predicaments in Turkey. The first pertains to the negative biases in police perceptions about protests and protesters that serve to justify and perpetuate a conflict-driven understanding of policing. The second is rooted in the institutional and policy realm and stems from the prevalence of a law-and-order approach to crowd control and public order.

  • 4.
    Atak, Kivanç
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Della Porta, Donatella
    Towards a Global Control? Policing and Protest in a New Century2016In: The SAGE Handbook of Global Policing / [ed] Ben Bradford, Beatrice Jauregui, Ian Loader, Jonny Steinberg, London: Sage Publications, 2016, 515-534 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
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