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  • 1.
    Dutt, Khaleda Gani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Can we rock the boat? A socio-cultural shift by educating the children of sex workers in Kalighat, Kolkata, India2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In South Asia, the intersection of culture, class, gender, and access to education addresses the unique interpretations of disability related to the social environment that often plays a deterministic role in influencing inclusive education. It draws our critical attention to the fact that it is imperative to understand the nuanced way in which disability studies is constructed in South Asia including identifying alternative constructed realities (Rao & Kalyanpur, 2015). It is time to promote a different discourse and bring about a shift in thinking from ‘some’ and ‘most’ to everybody which is an intrinsic goal of inclusive education. In this study, we draw references from the social model of disability studies underpinning that culture plays an influential role. Cultures are partial explanations of a world where dualities such as domination/subordination, superiority/inferiority, normality/abnormality are relentlessly reinforced and legitimized (Shakespeare, 2006). The externally imposed restrictions constructed by society presents insurmountable challenges to those subjected to poverty, societal degradation, gender discrimination and economic deprivation. Children become the most vulnerable population in these circumstances. According to the United Nations Office for Drugs and Crime in South Asia with India occupying a central position is the fastest-growing and second-largest region for human trafficking in the world, after East Asia. The lack of accurate figures makes it difficult to put a number of people being trafficked within South Asia, but activists voice that there are probably thousands of women and children are trafficked within India and as well as from its poorer neighbors Nepal and Bangladesh. Most of them are sold as bonded laborers workingin middle class homes or into marriage, in small shops and hotels or confined to brothels where they are repeatedly raped. In India alone, government data shows that 73,549 children went missing in 2014, of which 31,711 were untraceable compared to 90,654 missing in 2011, of which 34,406 were not found (Bhalla, 2016). However, the actual figure could be much higher as most of these cases are unreported. The overall aim of the study is to examine the pivotal role of inclusive education that is transforming the lives of children living in the red light district of Kalighat, Kolkata. The specific objectives are to identify and analyze the ways in which inclusive education has enabled in the realization of empowerment of the children of Kalighat and to examine the crucial role of intervention by stakeholders to translate decisions into action so that the children are not harvested back into the human trafficking industry.

  • 2.
    Dutt, Khaleda Gani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The Role of Adult Literacy in Transforming the Lives of Women in Rural India: Overcoming Gender Inequalities: Comparative case studies in Bhilwara District Rajasthan & Howrah District West Bengal India2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Indian diaspora is woven around castes, languages, dialects, religions- a young nation boasting of an ancient civilization in which inequalities are deeply ingrained in its culture and traditions. Although vital government interventions have succeeded in increasing the literacy rate of women in both urban and rural areas general household characteristics such as income, caste, occupation and education attainments of parents still continue to determine access, attendance, completion and learning outcomes of girls and women from severely disadvantaged communities. The critical issue investigated in the comparative case study is why and how established hegemonic roles changed because of the catalytic role of adult literacy. The research was conducted in Bhilwara District, Rajasthan and Howrah District, West Bengal, India where literacy has played an intrinsic role in transforming the lives of the rural and marginalized women. In Indian society social norms often prevent women from exercising their free choice and from taking full and equal advantage of opportunities for individual development, contribution and reward. So assessing empowerment/transformation would mean identifying the constraints to empowerment, how women’s agency has developed and finally looking if ‘agency’ was able to address the constraints to women’s access to adult literacy. This would also entail seeking answers to questions such as ‘How is transformation represented in their narratives? What was the impact of literacy upon their lives?

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