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  • 1.
    Ellefson, Merja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Stereotyping Russia, the Western Way2004In: News of the Other. Tracing Identity in Scandinavian Constructions of the Eastern Baltic Sea Region, Nordicom, Göteborg , 2004, p. 203-222Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Antony Beevor, Andra världskriget (Historiska Media, 2012)2012In: Populär historia, ISSN 1102-0822, no 12Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Apocalypse and Abomination: The Representation of Death in World War II Digital Games2003In: Sacred Media: Transforming traditions in the interplay of religion and media, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the case of WWII - and the WWII FPS (First Person Shooter) games that I am studying for my PhD thesis - death is a main ingredient, so plain and obvious that you might even slip past it while looking for interesting things to analyse. But, as a number of researchers - for example Zygmunt Bauman - have pointed out: representations of death and changes in these, as well as ways in which we handle death and dying, offer important knowledge about cultural processes and self-understanding in contemporary society. This also accounts for our perception of the body and its symbolism, including aspects of impurity and decay (Bauman 1992, 1993, Douglas 1966, Kristeva 1980, Turner 1996, Åhrén Snickare 2002; cf Bakhtin 1965). Obviously, there are important connections to the sphere of myth and religion. As pointed out by Durkheim and others after him, religion and mythical thought are to a large extent present even in so-called secularised societies (Durkheim 1912, Eliade 1957 a, 1957 b, Cassirer 1946), something that becomes quite clear in the context of war. Considering the specific context of war games I found it interesting to add a historical perspective on the mythic concept of war casualties, as examined by George L. Mosse in Fallen Soldiers. Reshaping the Memory of the World Wars (1990).

    In this paper I try to sketch the outlines of a study of the representation of death in WWII videogames. I also discuss what this might say about the relationship to death in contemporary society (or, more specifically, in Western popular culture), and conclude with some reflections on the ideological implications that might be found.

  • 4.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Apocalypse the Spielberg Way: Representations of Death and Ethics in Saving Private Ryan, Band of Brothers and the Videogame Medal of Honor: Frontline2003In: Level Up Conference Proceedings, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    “Authenticity” is an issue central to Steven Spielberg in his re-creations of World War II. But while the films are (hyper)realistic also in their representation of death, this is not the case in the videogames. Does this suggest anything about contemporary society’s view of killing, dying and death? In my paper I study death and ethics in Saving Private Ryan, the TV series Band of Brothers, and the video game Medal of Honor: Frontline (2002), all sharing the same topic: the Allied invasion of Normandy during World War II. The differences indicate an ambiguity in the notion of authenticity as well as different strategies of handling ethical questions.

  • 5.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Besök i nazisternas elitskola2014In: Militär Historia, ISSN 2000-3471, no 10, p. 2p. 60-61Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Body, Blut und Boden: pseudo-religious discourses on health in Nazi Germany2013In: The Book of Abstracts: The European Society for the Study of Western Esotericism 4th International Conference, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2013, p. 19-20Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    National Socialist ideology is founded on an intrinsic relation between Volksgenossen, Volksgemeinschaft and Volkskörper – national comrades, ethnic community and racial corpus. Its doctrine of the ”racially outstanding” physiognomy and healthy body as the physical reflections of the true Germanic spirit traces its roots back to the 18th century and the veneration of Greek and Roman sculptures of gods, goddesses and other mythical figures as ideal images of human beings. Although the idea of an a priori correspondence between a healthy body and a healthy soul was by no means a new one, it was further popularized and propagated in the Western fin de siècle counterculture, with the Lebensreform movement as one of its major currents. With explicitly racist and anti-Semitic ideas added to the concept, the healthy German citizen became one of the major ventures of the Nazi regime.While some of the more gruesome practices and crimes – such as the T4 Euthanasia program – are well-known, this paper will focus on their often neglected philosophical foundations. It examines the esoteric connections between body, blood and soil in Nazi Germany, focusing on NSDAP and SS educational practices, and relates them to issues of pseudo-religion and pseudo-science.

  • 7.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Das Dritte Reich als Nervenkitzel: Formen des Umgangs mit Nazi-Deutschland und dem Zweiten Weltkrieg in der zeitgenössigen Populärkultur2005In: Banal Militarism: Zur Veralltäglichung des Militärischen im Zivilen, Transcript, Bielefeld , 2005, p. 409-425Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Die Wewelsburg, NS-inspirierte Okkultur und die Kommerzialisierung des Bösen2015In: Mythos Wewelsburg: Fakten und Legenden / [ed] Kirsten John-Stucke, Daniela Siepe, Paderborn: Verlag Ferdinand Schöningh, 2015, p. 249-264Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Fighting hyperreality with hyperreality: History and death in World War II digital games2007In: Games and Culture, ISSN 1555-4120, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 366-375Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To describe the virtual worlds of digital games as hyperreal and simulacra has become almost a cliché. The perfect copy without an original, complete and even flowing over with signs adding to its real appearance but simultaneously disguising a basic loss of referentials—many of the games can be looked on as substitutes for the real world (if there is such a thing). In this article, I use World War II digital games as examples of hyperrealities, using some of Baudrillard's thoughts on hyperreality and simulacra, on our relation to history and on what he considers to be a fundamental longing for reality that has been lost to us in (post)modern Western society.

  • 10.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Hitler as our Devil? Mainstream representations of Nazi Germany in popular media2010In: Monsters in the Mirror: Representations of Nazism in Popular Culture / [ed] Maartje Abbenhuis-Ash & Sara Buttsworth, Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-Clio , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In my PhD dissertation (2008) I have showed how the depiction of especially Hitler and the SS in post-war popular culture contains striking elements of the mythical, both in a traditional, religiously connected sense and in the modern, secular, as described by Roland Barthes. This is not only to be found in fictional representations, but also – and perhaps surprisingly – to a large extent in documentary films. Henry Jenkins has shown how today´s media landscape is characterised by a convergence, not only between different media technologies and media forms but also regarding the narrative. He describes how transmedia storytelling has become an important part in popular knowledge building, a process for which the case of Hitler, Nazi Germany and WWII provides an excellent example. The representations in films and literature – fact as well as fiction – merges with expressions in and, when it comes to the construction of meaning within the audience, impressions from other media forms: digital games, internet home pages, blogs and discussion forums, comic books, art, music, table-top role-playing games… With an extended definition of media, this also includes such areas as subcultural fashion, Nazi memorabilia collecting, live role-playing and historical reenactment. I argue that although difficult to grasp in its entirety, this whole field must be taken into consideration when trying to understand the phenomenon of Nazi Germany in popular culture, including the construction of popular memory.

    My study, dealing with both media texts and the audience through reception and ethnographic studies, clearly shows that there is a “mainstream” representation of Nazi Germany which is often explicitly building on the metaphysical. Hitler takes on the role as the Devil, with the SS as his demonic servants. This may be interpreted as a reenchantment of our Western world previously disenchanted by modernisation, secularisation etc (cf Weber). In this article I show how the concept of myth – in both senses mentioned above – is shaped within the media texts and how it is received and interpreted by the audience. While some scholars (for example Rosenfeld) have expressed fear for a banalisation and normalisation of Hitler and the Nazi era through popular media, I argue that Hitler on the contrary fills an important role as the Devil of our times.

  • 11.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    “Immersive Historicity in World War II Digital Games”2006In: HUMAN IT: Tidskrift för studier av IT ur ett humanvetenskapligt perspektiv, ISSN 1402-1501, no 8.2, p. 61–90-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I examine the potential feeling of time travel – historical immersion – in the World War II games Medal of Honor: Underground, Medal of Honor: Frontline, Wolfenstein 3D and Return to Castle Wolfenstein. To accomplish this, I make a semiotic analysis of visual and auditory signs based upon the three categories of space, time, and sound. I also consider the element of myth to be an influencing factor. WWII games contribute, in their own way, to our collective memory. Nevertheless, in these games historical facts are not considered as important as excitement, heroes, villains (the dichotomy good/evil), and gothic surroundings. Thus, although they claim to have historical settings and narratives, they are rather reshaping WWII as a stereotypical event with more connections to popular films than to actual historical events.

  • 12.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Julian Strube, Vril: Eine okkulte Urkraft in Theosophie und esoterischen Neonazismus, München: Wilhelm Fink 20132014In: Aries: Journal for the Study of Western Esotericism, ISSN 1567-9896, E-ISSN 1570-0593, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 264-267Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Kryptohistoria och det nazifantastiska som kollektivt minne2009In: Reflektionens gestalt / [ed] Kristina Fjelkestam, Stockholm: Södertörns högskola , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Medier i medier: Det okända och döden som ett annat sätt att vara2012In: Döden i medierna: Våld, tröst och fascination / [ed] Anja Hirdman, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Muslims with Swastikas: The ’Arab-Nazi connection’ in Western popular history2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Mördarmaskin, moralist eller mittemellan?: Om konstruktionen av krigarhjälten i dataspel och populärfilm2004In: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, Vol. 2, p. 74-99Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En närmast outslitlig arketyp utgörs av hjälten: en med extraordinära egenskaper begåvad karaktär som kämpar för det goda. Inom västvärldens populärkultur kan det också tyckas finnas något av en standardmall för denne: en riktig hjälte är vit, man, och går ut i strid för att ställa saker till rätta – kort sagt, en krigare. Hjältebilden säger därigenom också något om föreställda nationella identiteter och idealtyper. I den här artikeln studeras några av 1900- och 2000-talens krigshjältetyper och hjältemyter så som de framställs i populära filmer från USA och Tyskland. Avslutningsvis jämförs dessa med motsvarande representationer i några av dagens dator-/tv-spel med tema andra världskriget.

  • 17.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    “Nazi Fans” but not Neo-Nazis: The Cultural Community of “WWII Fanatics”2006In: Returning (to) Communities: Theory, Culture and Political Practice of the Communal, Rodopi, Amsterdam/New York, NY , 2006, p. 223-240Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is based on a reception study I have made of four Swedish men who all but one have World War II/Nazi Germany as their greatest interest. Using Fiske's concept of "shadow cultural economy" I examine what turned out to be a form of fan community around WWII. Two of these men are into WWII role-play and strategy games, meeting with other "Nazi-fans" sharing the same interests and hobbies. This means that they have been forced to consider the ethical aspects of their hobby for being able to legitimate it both to others but perhaps even more to themselves.

  • 18.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Nazism2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I förra veckan sände SVT ett uppmärksammat reportage i Uppdrag granskning om politiskt våld i Sverige och nazistiska Svenska motståndsrörelsen. I dag föll domen mot den vänsterextremist som högg en nazist i ryggen i Kärrtorp, och den 1:a maj marscherar det nazistiska partiet Svenskarnas parti genom Jönköping för tredje året i rad. Eva Kingsepp – medievetare verksam som forskare och lektor vid Historiska institutionen på Stockholms universitet – skriver om hur nazismen och nazister ofta skildras i populärkulturen. 

  • 19.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Peter Longerich, Goebbels2013In: Populär historia, ISSN 1102-0822, no 8Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Postcolonial shame? The Second World War in North Africa in tv documentaries2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Robert Rosenstone’s words, ”history (as we practice it) is an ideological and cultural product of the Western World at a particular time in its development”. Documentary films are in this respect not different from fiction: both cooperate in the creation of history as performative discourse, thereby giving symbolic meaning to the world. In the case of WWII the historical events are often framed in a way that tells us more about the world today than that of yesterday, using spectacle and mythical concepts as ways of engaging the audience emotionally. The highlighting of heroism, patriotism and militarism is mixed with an encouraged identification with victims.

    As part of a postdoc project I examine Western tv documentaries on WWII in North Africa. What frames are used in the representations? Considering that the ”Good” Allies largely consisted of the region’s colonial powers, how are issues of (post)colonialism and orientalism being represented?

  • 21.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Postmodern apokalyps? Om mytiska symboler i datorspel om andra världskriget2005In: ACSIS nationella forskarkonferens för kulturstudier, Norrköping 13–15 juni 2005. Konferensrapport publicerad elektroniskt på www.ep.liu.se/ecp/015/., 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En av de största genrerna inom det idag allt mer växande området dator- och TV-spel utgörs av spel som på ett eller annat sätt knyter an till andra världskriget och Nazityskland. Här gäller det att inte bara bekämpa ondskan i form av nazister utan inte sällan även deras mardrömslika bundsförvanter – zombies, gengångare och andra ohyggliga varelser. Kopplingen mellan nazister, zombies och ockulta krafter över huvud taget finns inte bara i datorspel, utan har varit ett slitstarkt inslag i den västerländska populärkulturen under flera decennier. Med utgångspunkt i det populära datorspelet Return to Castle Wolfenstein (2001) analyserar detta paper förekomsten av religiöst präglad symbolik i populärkulturens representationer av Nazityskland, och undersöker vidare relationerna mellan ett sekulariserat och ett religiöst förhållningssätt i fråga om detta.

  • 22.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Skola för nazieliten: Ordensburg Vogelsang2013In: Populär Historia, ISSN 1102-0822, no 4, p. 38-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Svart sol och kosmisk kamp: Naziesoteriska teman i efterkrigstida tysk skönlitteratur2010In: Tecken i texten förborgade: 16 artiklar om relationen mellan skönlitteratur och västerländsk esoterism / [ed] Mattias Fyhr & Per Faxneld, Umeå: Bokförlaget h:ström – Text & Kultur , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Tatsachenbasierte Nazi-Exploitation: Dokumentarfilme zum „Nazi-Okkultismus“2015In: Mythos Wewelsburg: Fakten und Legenden / [ed] Kirsten John-Stucke, Daniela Siepe, Paderborn: Verlag Ferdinand Schöningh, 2015, p. 265-276Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The Power of the Black Sun: (Oc)cultural perspectives on Nazi/SS esotericism2012In: ContERN Cyberproceedings: Papers from the 1st International Conference on Contemporary Esotericism / [ed] Egil Asprem, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses some of the different meanings appointed to the spiritual centre of Heinrich Himmler’s SS in Wewelsburg, including the Black Sun symbol, a floor mosaic in the North Tower of the castle. Wewelsburg castle and more recently the Black Sun have during the last decades become established as a token of Nazi esotericism – or occultism, the term I will use here – both in popular culture and in parts of the western esoteric underground as well as in more or less pro-Nazi circles.

    The aim of this paper is twofold, both related to the uses of history. The first concerns the basic assumptions about Nazi occultism as a phenomenon in itself. -What are the discursive relations between official memory culture and popular culture regarding Nazi occultism? The second is to look at the Temple of Set, more specifically its Order of the Trapezoid, as an example of how an esoteric group relates to Nazi occultism and puts this, as it is being conceived by leading members of the Order, into magical use. -From where do practicing occultists working with elements from National Socialism get the theoretical basis for what might be called their magical ideology?

  • 26.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Thrills of the Third Reich: Contemporary popular culture approaches to Nazi Germany2007In: Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I look at visual representations of World War II, compare them to interviews with what I call “Third Reich enthusiasts” and examine how the media texts and images function in creating a contemporary image of the historical events. WWII games cooperate, in their own way, in the maintenance of our collective memory. Nevertheless, in these games historical facts are not considered as important as excitement, heroes, villains (the dichotomy good/evil), and gothic surroundings. Thus, although claiming historical settings and narratives, they are rather reshaping WWII as a stereotypical event with more connections to popular films than to history in it self.

  • 27.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Web hate, social and mainstream media: 'Why Anders Behring Breivik is (not) a hero'2013In: From Theory to Practice: How to Assess, Measure and Apply Impartiality in News and Current Affairs / [ed] Leon Barkho, Bristol: Intellect Ltd., 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines the relations between mainstream news media and alternative grassroots discourse, focusing on the mass murders in Oslo in July 2011 and the controversial Swedish chat room Flashback. Flashback is known as a place where one can rapidly find detailed (more or less correct) information about recent events and the people involved in them. It is also an open forum where all kinds of topics are being discussed, not seldom including expressions of values and ideas that are considered offensive and/or “politically incorrect”. The Oslo events were in Sweden followed by a media debate about hate speech in the commentaries on news media web sites and in social media, in which it has been argued that the latter provides fertile grounds for hate speech and consequently also hateful actions.

    The study shows that several of the texts in mainstream press were heavily biased and extremely negative towards social media, especially Flashback. References were frequently being made to one of the most controversial threads, ‘Varför Anders Behring Breivik är en hjälte’/’Why Anders Behring Breivik is a hero’, although the actual contents of it were either neglected or heavily distorted. This resulted in a discourse in which almost all the characteristics of moral media panics identified by Cohen (1972) are present. The article concludes with a discussion on possible explanations.

  • 28.
    Kingsepp, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Schult, TanjaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Hitler für alle: Populärkulturella perspektiv på Nazityskland, andra världskriget och Förintelsen2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med Hiter für alle är att ur ett brett perspektiv ställa frågor och problematisera kring populärkulturens referenser till Nazityskland, andra världskriget och förintelsen. Det handlar om företeelser som finns överallt i vår vardag, skenbart utan att någon ägnar närmare eftertanke åt vad dessa referenser egentligen kan tänkas göra med oss. Tanken är att försöka få grepp om ett område som hittills varit mycket lite belyst. Naturligtvis blir det ingen heltäckande bild, men däremot en god tvärvetenskaplig början med skribenter från olika forskningssfärer. Här ingår texter om Hitler i nutida dagstidningar; om konstnärer som provokatörer med bl a nazismen som symbol; om krigsfilmer som nationell identitetsskapare.

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