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  • 1.
    Koerselman, Kristian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Admissible statistics of educational achievement scores2010In: Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 5 / [ed] María Jesús Mancebón-Torrubia, Domingo P. Ximénez-de-Embún, José María Gómez-Sancho, Gregorio Giménez Esteban, Madrid: Aede, asociacion de economia de la educacion , 2010, p. 781-796Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Labor economists regularly regress educational achievement scores on covariates to examine what acts achievement. I discuss the measurement and interpretation of achievement scores, and argue that, as the scores are typically measured on an ordinal scale, their analysis in terms of higher level statistics such as means is inappropriate, and that we should use quantile-based analysis instead. I investigate how large possible bias from mean-based methods is by comparing test score distributions to the distribution of monetary value of the same scores. In most cases, the bias will be quantitatively small, and conclusions qualitatively robust.

  • 2.
    Koerselman, Kristian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Bias from the use of mean-based methods on test scores2011Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Koerselman, Kristian
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Incentives from curriculum tracking2013In: Economics of Education Review, ISSN 0272-7757, E-ISSN 1873-7382, Vol. 32, p. 140-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Curriculum tracking creates incentives in the years before its start, and we should therefore expect test scores to be higher during those years. I find robust evidence for incentive effects of tracking in the UK based on the UK comprehensive school reform. Results from the Swedish comprehensive school reform are inconclusive. Internationally, I find a large and widening test score gap between early and late tracking countries. Incentive effects of tracking show how early age scores can be endogenous with respect to later-age policies, and add to a growing literature on incentives in education.

  • 4.
    Koerselman, Kristian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Incentives from Curriculum Tracking: Cross-national and UK Evidence2011Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Koerselman, Kristian
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Uusitalo, Roope
    The risk and return of human capital investments2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Investing in human capital increases lifetime income, but these investments may involve substantial risk. In this paper we use a Finnish panel spanning 22 years to predict the mean, the variance and the skew of the present value of lifetime income, and to calculate certainty equivalent lifetime income at different levels of education. We find that university education is associated with about a half a million euro increase in discounted lifetime disposable income compared to vocational high school. Accounting for risk does little to change this picture. By contrast, vocational high school is associated with only moderately higher lifetime income compared to compulsory education, and the entire difference is due to differential nonemployment.

  • 6.
    Koerselman, Kristian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Åbo Akademi University, Finland; Helsinki Center of Economic Research, Finland.
    Uusitalo, Roope
    The risk and return of human capital investments2014In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 30, p. 154-163Article in journal (Refereed)
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