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  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Norén, Karin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Multiple prehistoric introductions of the mountain hare (Lepus timidus) on a remote island, as revealed by ancient DNA2016Inngår i: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 43, nr 9, s. 1786-1796Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The majority of the non-volant mammals now present on the island of Gotland, Sweden, have been introduced in modern times. One exception is the mountain hare (Lepus timidus), which was present on the island more than 9000 years ago. This paper investigates the origins of the Gotland hares and temporal changes in their genetic structure, and considers how they may have reached the island.

    Location: The island of Gotland, Sweden (57°30′ N, 18°20′ E).

    Methods: Two fragments of the mitochondrial D-loop 130 + 164 base pairs in length from skeletal remains from 40 ancient mountain hares from Gotland, 38 from the Swedish mainland and five from Lithuania were analysed and compared with 90 modern L. timidus haplotypes from different locations in Eurasia and five haplotypes of the Don-hare (Lepus tanaiticus) morphotype.

    Results: The Mesolithic hares from Gotland (7304 bc–5989 bc) cluster with modern hares from Russia, Scotland, the Alps and Fennoscandia whereas the Gotland hares from the Neolithic and onwards (2848 bc–1641 ad) cluster with Neolithic hares from the Swedish mainland and modern hares from Fennoscandia. The Neolithic haplotypes from Lithuania and the Don-hare haplotypes were dispersed within the network. The level of differentiation (FST) between the Mesolithic and Neolithic hares on Gotland was twice as great as that observed on the mainland.

    Main conclusions: The ancient hares on Gotland fall into two haplogroups separated in time, indicating that the mountain hare became extinct at one point, with subsequent re-colonization events. In view of the isolated location of Gotland, it is probable that the hares were brought there by human means of transport.

  • 2.
    Andrén, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologi.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Victor, Helena
    Kalmar Länsmuseum.
    Fischer, Svante
    Uppsala universitet.
    The ringfort by the sea: Archaeological geophysical prospection and excavations at Sandby borg (Öland)2014Inngår i: Archäologisches Korrespondenzblatt, ISSN 0342-734X, Vol. 44, nr 3, s. 413-428Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeological investigations and clear aerial photos have identified the presence of house foundations within several ringforts on the island of Öland, east of the Swedish mainland. One of them, Sandby borg, was selected for further investigations by means of a ground-penetrating radar (GRP) and magnetometry survey. A subsequent excavation was carried out to validate the geophysical results. The results of the geophysical survey clearly show the presence of 36 or 37 stone foundations for houses situated radially around the wall of the fort as well as of 16 or 17 similar house foundations in a central building group. The geophysical results also provided information on other buried features within the fort and also confirm the location of a third gate situated in the north-western part of the fort. The available evidence indicates that the ringfort was used for military purposes, or as a place of refuge in times of unrest, for a limited period of time during the late 5th century.

  • 3.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Hersteinsson, P.
    Liden, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Nelson, E.
    Dietary Variation in Arctic Foxes (Alopex-Lagopus) - an Analysis of Stable Carbon Isotopes1994Inngår i: Oecologia, Vol. 99, nr 3-4, s. 226-232Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We used stable carbon isotopes to analyse individual variation in arctic fox diet. We extracted collagen from bones (the lower jaw), and measured stable carbon isotopes. The foxes came from three different localities: Iceland, where both microtines and reindeer are rare; west Greenland, where microtines are absent; and Sweden, where seat analyses showed the primary food to be microtine rodents and reindeer. The Icelandic samples included foxes from both coastal and inland habitats, the Swedish sample came from an inland area, and the Greenland sample from coastal sites. The spatial variation in the isotopic pattern followed a basic division between marine and terrestrial sources of protein. Arctic foxes from inland sites had delta(13)C values of -21.4 (Ice land) and -20.4 parts per thousand (Sweden), showing typical terrestrial values. Coastal foxes from Greenland had typical marine Values of -14.9 parts per thousand, whereas coastal foxes from Iceland had intermediate values of -17.7 parts per thousand. However, there was individual variation within each sample, probably caused by habitat heterogeneity and territoriality among foxes. The variation on a larger scale was related to the availability of different food items. These results were in accordance with other dietary analyses based on seat analyses. This is the first time that stable isotopes have been used to reveal individual dietary patterns. Our study also indicated that isotopic values can be used on a global scale.

  • 4. Bläuer, Auli
    et al.
    Arppe, Laura
    Niemi, Marianna
    Oinonen, Markku
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Taavitsainen, Jussi-Pekka
    Kantanen, Juha
    Inferring Prehistorical and Historical Feeding Practices from δ15N and δ13C Isotope Analysis on Finnish Archaeological Domesticated Ruminant Bones and Teeth2016Inngår i: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. XXXIV, s. 38-55Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Calmfors, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för internationell ekonomi.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Kragic Jansfelt, Danica
    Larsson, Mats
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidin, Sven
    Sjöberg, Britt-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för biokemi och biofysik.
    Öquist, Gunnar
    Dåliga jobbvillkor gör att Sverige tappar elitforskare2014Inngår i: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 6. Das, Supriyo Kumar
    et al.
    Ghosh, Santanu
    Isaksson, Sven
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Dey, Arunabha
    Organic residue analysis in archaeological ceramics from Lahuradewa, India: role of contaminants2018Inngår i: Current Science, ISSN 0011-3891, Vol. 115, nr 8, s. 1456-1458Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 7.
    Dury, Jack P. R.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Fjellström, Markus
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Wallerström, Thomas
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    CONSIDERATION OF FRESHWATER AND MULTIPLE MARINE RESERVOIR EFFECTS: DATING OF INDIVIDUALS WITH MIXED DIETS FROM NORTHERN SWEDEN2018Inngår i: Radiocarbon, ISSN 0033-8222, E-ISSN 1945-5755, Vol. 60, nr 5, s. 1561-1585Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Human burials from the cemetery at the Rounala church, northern Sweden, were radiocarbon (C-14) dated to shed light on the use of the cemetery. Carbon, nitrogen and sulfur stable isotope analysis of bone collagen from 19 distinct individuals indicated that these individuals had a mixed diet consisting of freshwater, marine and terrestrial resources. Dietary modeling using FRUITS was employed to calculate the contributions of the different resources for each individual. These data were then used to calculate individual Delta R values, taking into account freshwater and multiple marine reservoir effects, the latter caused by Baltic and Atlantic marine dietary inputs, respectively. C-14 dating of tissues from modern freshwater fish species demonstrate a lack of a freshwater reservoir effect in the area. Two OxCal models were used to provide endpoint age estimates. The calibrated data suggest that the site's cemetery was most likely in use already from the 14th century, and perhaps until at least the late 18th century.

  • 8.
    Economou, Christos
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Panagopoulos, Ioannis
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Ancient-DNA reveals an Asian type of Mycobacterium leprae in medieval Scandinavia2013Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, nr 1, s. 465-470Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. Its impact on human populations and societies of the past as well as its phylogeographic patterns around the world – at least in modern times – has been well documented. This slow growing bacterium has been shown to exist in distinct ‘SNP types’ that occur in relatively defined parts of the globe. The routes that the disease followed in the past are, however, still uncertain. This study of ancient-DNA typing of archaeological human remains from Sweden dated to early Medieval times provides genetic evidence that a transmission of M. leprae ‘SNP subtype’ 2G – found mainly in Asia – took or had already taken place at that time from the Middle East to Scandinavia. This finding is unique in the history of leprosy in Europe. All human specimens from this continent – both modern and ancient – that have been tested to date showed that the one responsible for the infection strains of M. leprae belong to ‘SNP type’ 3, whereas our results show that there were some European populations that were hosts to bacteria representing ‘SNP type’ 2 of the species as well.

  • 9.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Frei, Karin Margarita
    Howcroft, Rachel
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Gummesson, Sara
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Molin, Fredrik
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Frei, Robert
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Diet and mobility among Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in Motala (Sweden) - The isotope perspective2018Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 17, s. 904-918Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent excavations at the sites of Strandvägen and Kanaljorden in Motala, Eastern Central Sweden, have unearthed complex and varied funerary remains from the Mesolithic. The two sites are situated on opposite banks of the river Motala Ström. While geographically close and roughly covering the same time span (c. 8000–7000 cal. BP), the funerary remains reveal differences and similarities in the treatment of the dead between the two localities. While at Strandvägen human bones were mostly found either scattered along the river bed or in inhumation graves, Kanaljorden contains wetland depositions of disarticulated skulls. We have conducted multi-isotope analyses of δ13C, δ15N, δ34S and 87Sr/86Sr of human and animal remains with the aim of reconstructing the dietary patterns, geographic provenance and mobility of the interred. A series of faunal reference samples and, in the case of 87Sr/86Sr, soil samples have been analysed in order to establish relevant isotopic baselines. The results show a protein intake dominated by aquatic resources, probably consisting of both freshwater and marine fish in varied proportions. The strontium isotope data indicate an interesting distinction between the individuals buried on either side of the river Motala Ström. Five out of six sampled individuals from Strandvägen have isotope ratios consistent with a local provenance, whereas ratios from seven out of eight Kanaljorden individuals indicate a non-local origin. The δ34S analysis proved problematic as a majority of the samples appear to be affected by diagenesis. This is probably the result of contamination by exogenous sulphur from surrounding fluvial and lacustrine sediments, as has previously been reported from other waterlogged sites.

  • 10.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Dietary life histories in Stone Age Northern Europe2013Inngår i: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 32, nr 3, s. 288-302Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We present here a framework for using stable isotope analysis of bone and teeth to study individual life history. A sampling strategy and analytical approach for stable carbon and nitrogen analysis of bone and dentine collagen optimised for intra-individual purposes is put forward. The rationale behind this strategy, various requirements and constrains, and recommendations on how to modify it according to variations in material and analytical instrumentation, are discussed and explained in detail. Based on intra-individual data for 131 human individuals from Mesolithic and Neolithic sites in Northern Europe, we consider the sources and various kinds of variation one is likely to find, and how the data can be explained and transformed into an archaeologically meaningful interpretation. It is concluded that the use of stable isotope analysis to trace individual life history is not limited to carefully excavated, neatly preserved, single burials with articulate skeletal remains. Even collective burials, disturbed graves, disarticulated human remains in cultural layers, or other depositions that deviate from what is often considered as a proper burial, offer the possibility to look at individual life biographies.

  • 11.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Fornander, Elin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Kanstrup, Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Schoultz, Pia
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Olofsson, Hanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Same island, different diet: Cultural evolution of food practice on Öland, Sweden, from the Mesolithic to the Roman Period2008Inngår i: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 27, nr 4, s. 520-543Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mesolithic–Neolithic transition in north-west Europe has been described as rapid and uniform, entailing a swift shift from the use of marine and other wild resources to domesticated terrestrial resources. Here, we approach the when, what and how of this transition on a regional level, using empirical data from Öland, an island in the Baltic Sea off the Swedish east coast, and also monitor changes that occurred after the shift. Radiocarbon dating and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of bones and teeth from 123 human individuals, along with faunal isotope data from 27 species, applying to nine sites on Öland and covering a time span from the Mesolithic to the Roman Period, demonstrate a great diversity in food practices, mainly governed by culture and independent of climatic changes. There was a marked dietary shift during the second half of the third millennium from a mixed marine diet to the use of exclusively terrestrial resources, interpreted as marking the large-scale introduction of farming. Contrary to previous claims, this took place at the end of the Neolithic and not at the onset. Our data also show that culturally induced dietary transitions occurred continuously throughout prehistory. The availability of high-resolution data on various levels, from intra-individual to inter-population, makes stable isotope analysis a powerful tool for studying the evolution of food practices.

  • 12.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Papmehl-Dufay, Ludvig
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Cultural interaction and change: a multi-isotopic approach to the Neolithization in coastal areas2013Inngår i: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 45, nr 3, s. 430-446Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on data from the megalithic tomb in Resmo on oland in the Baltic Sea, we use a multi-isotopic approach, involving the systematic treatment and modelling of extensive human and faunal isotopic data (C-14, C-13, N-15, S-34 and Sr-87/Sr-86), along with archaeological contextual evidence, to study change and interaction. The fact that people utilize aquatic resources necessitates modelling of the sulphur and strontium isotope data, to prevent the aquatic contribution from obscuring the local terrestrial signal. It was possible to demonstrate how the people buried in Resmo went through dynamic changes in diet, mobility patterns and cultural identity during more than two millennia of burial practice: from the incipient farmers of the Funnel Beaker Culture, through the cultural encounters and transitions during the Middle Neolithic, to the newcomers furthering intensified agriculture, trade and metal craftsmanship during the Bronze Age.

  • 13.
    Ersmark, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Baryshnikov, Gennady
    Higham, Thomas
    Argant, Alain
    Castaños, Pedro
    Döppes, Doris
    Gasparik, Mihaly
    Germonpré, Mietje
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Lipecki, Grzegorz
    Marciszak, Adrian
    Miller, Rebecca
    Moreno-García, Marta
    Pacher, Martina
    Robu, Marius
    Rodriguez-Varela, Ricardo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Rojo Guerra, Manuel
    Sabol, Martin
    Spassov, Nikolai
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Valdiosera, Christina
    Villaluenga, Aritza
    Stewart, John R.
    Dalén, Love
    Genetic turnovers and northern survival during the last glacial maximum in European brown bears2019Inngår i: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 9, nr 10, s. 5891-5905Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The current phylogeographic pattern of European brown bears (Ursus arctos) has commonly been explained by postglacial recolonization out of geographically distinct refugia in southern Europe, a pattern well in accordance with the expansion/contraction model. Studies of ancient DNA from brown bear remains have questioned this pattern, but have failed to explain the glacial distribution of mitochondrial brown bear clades and their subsequent expansion across the European continent. We here present 136 new mitochondrial sequences generated from 346 remains from Europe, ranging in age between the Late Pleistocene and historical times. The genetic data show a high Late Pleistocene diversity across the continent and challenge the strict confinement of bears to traditional southern refugia during the last glacial maximum (LGM). The mitochondrial data further suggest a genetic turnover just before this time, as well as a steep demographic decline starting in the mid-Holocene. Levels of stable nitrogen isotopes from the remains confirm a previously proposed shift toward increasing herbivory around the LGM in Europe. Overall, these results suggest that in addition to climate, anthropogenic impact and inter-specific competition may have had more important effects on the brown bear's ecology, demography, and genetic structure than previously thought.

  • 14.
    Ersmark, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Baryshnikov, Gennady
    Higham, Tom
    Argant, Alain
    Döppes, Doris
    Germonpré, Mietje
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lipecki, Grzegorz
    Marciszak, Adrian
    Pacher, Martina
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Sabol, Martin
    Valdiosera, Christina
    Villaluenga, Aritza
    Stewart, John
    Dalén, Love
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Genetic revolutions and northern survival during the last glacial maximum in European brown bearsManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 15.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Svestad, Asgeir
    Food and Cultural Traits in Coastal Northern Finnmark in the 14th-19th Centuries2019Inngår i: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we used stable isotope analysis and radiocarbon dating to study diet, mobility and chronology in two late medieval/historical coastal populations in northern Norway. We have shown that the individuals buried at Kirkegardsoya date between 1331 and 1953 cal AD and had a homogenous marine diet, whereas the individuals buried at Gullholmen had a more heterogeneous diet, consisting of both terrestrial and marine proteins and date between 1661 and 1953 cal AD. We have demonstrated that reindeer protein was not an important part of their diet, and also discussed the importance of correcting for the marine reservoir effect in populations with a coastal subsistence. Our interpretation is that individuals buried at Kirkegardsoya primarily belonged to a Coastal Sami community, although Norwegians with a similar diet (and likely comprising a minor population in the area) cannot be ruled out. The more varied diet and mobility at Gullholmen could, as predicted, indicate that these individuals may have had a more diverse cultural affinity.

  • 16.
    Fornander, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Wild at heart: Approaching Pitted Ware identity, economy and cosmology through stable isotopes in skeletal material from the Neolithic site Korsnäs in Eastern Central Sweden2008Inngår i: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 27, nr 3, s. 281-297Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Middle Neolithic Pitted Ware Culture on the Baltic Sea islands comprised a common identity distinguished, in part, by an almost exclusively marine diet. Based on evidence from the first stable isotope analysis on Pitted Ware skeletal material from the Eastern Central Swedish mainland, we suggest that this identity was shared by PWC groups in the archipelago of the west side of the Baltic. Fifty-six faunal and 26 human bone and dentine samples originating from the Pitted Ware site Korsnäs in Södermanland, Sweden were analysed, and the data clearly shows that the diet of the Korsnäs people was marine, predominantly based on seal. The isotope data further indicate that the pig bones found in large quantities on the site emanate from wild boar rather than domestic pigs. The large representation of pig on several Pitted Ware sites, which cannot be explained in terms of economy, is interpreted as the results of occasional hunting of and ritual feasting on wild boar, indicating that the animal held a prominent position, alongside seal, in the hunting identity and cosmology of the Pitted Ware people. Further, eleven new radiocarbon dates are presented, placing the Korsnäs site, with a large probability, within Middle Neolithic A.

  • 17.
    Fornander, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Identifying mobility in populations with mixed marine-terrestrial diets: strontium isotope analysis of skeletal material from a passage grave in Resmo, Öland, SwedenInngår i: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 18.
    Fornander, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Andersson, Per
    Identifying mobility in populations with mixed marine/terrestrial diets: strontium isotope analysis of skeletal material from a passage grave in Resmo, Öland, Sweden2015Inngår i: Forging identities: the mobility of culture in bronze age Europe. Report from a Marie Curie project 2009-2012 with concluding conference at Aarhus University, Moesgaard 2012 / [ed] Paulina Suchowska-Ducke, Samantha Scott Reiter, Helle Vandkilde, Oxford: British Archaeological Reports , 2015, s. 183-192Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Strontium isotope analysis of skeletal material as a means to reconstruct prehistoric residential patterns has previously mainly been applied to populations with terrestrial diets. Here we present a model for populations with mixed marine/terrestrial diets, which is based on two-component mixing of strontium isotopes. Applying this model, we can estimate the original strontium isotope value of the terrestrial component of the diet. Accordingly it is possible to identify non-local individuals even if they had a mixed marine/terrestrial diet. The model is applied to tooth enamel samples representing nine individuals recovered from a passage grave in Resmo, on the island of Öland in the Baltic Sea, where at least five non-local individuals, representing at least two different geographical regions of origin, were identified. Non-local individuals were more frequent during the Bronze Age than during previous phases.

  • 19.
    Glykou, Aikaterini
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Schmitt, M.
    Kooijman, E.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Intra- and inter-tooth variation in strontium isotope ratios from prehistoric seals by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry2018Inngår i: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, ISSN 0951-4198, E-ISSN 1097-0231, Vol. 32, nr 15, s. 1215-1224Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    RationaleStrontium isotope ratios (Sr-87/Sr-86) in modern-day marine environments are considered to be homogeneous (0.7092). However, in the Baltic Sea, the Sr ratios are controlled by mixing seawater and continental drainage from major rivers discharging into the Baltic. This pilot study explores if variations in Sr can be detected in marine mammals from archaeological sites in the Baltic Sea. Methods(87)Sr/Sr-86 ratios were measured in tooth enamel from three seal species by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS). The method enables micro-sampling of solid materials. This is the first time that the method has been applied to marine samples from archaeological collections. ResultsThe analyses showed inter-tooth Sr-87/Sr-86 variation suggesting that different ratios can be detected in different regions of the Baltic Sea. Furthermore, the intra-tooth variation suggests possible different geographic origin or seasonal movement of seals within different regions in the Baltic Sea through their lifetime. ConclusionsThe method was successfully applied to archaeological marine samples showing that: (1) the Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio in marine environments is not uniform, (2) Sr-87/Sr-86 differences might reflect differences in ecology and life history of different seal species, and (3) archaeological mobility studies based on Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios in humans should therefore be evaluated together with diet reconstruction.

  • 20.
    Götherström, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Collins, M. J.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Bone preservation and DNA amplification2002Inngår i: Archaeometry, ISSN 0003-813X, E-ISSN 1475-4754, Vol. 44, nr 3, s. 395-404Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of ancient DNA has increased during the past two decades in several scientific disciplines. However, the underlying mechanism of DNA degradation in bone tissue are poorly understood. Here we address the importance of hydroxyapatite and collagen for DNA preservation in bone. We used two series of bones and teeth, one set of modern experimentally degraded bovid bones and one set of ancient horse bones/teeth. From these samples, we measured crystallinity, DNA presence and extracted collagen. The mtDNA fragments, parts of cytochrome b and the D-loop were amplified and sequenced. Our results show that presence of DNA was strongly related to the crystallinity in the hydroxyapatite and to the amount of collagen. This suggests that the hypothesis that hydroxyapatite has a crucial role in DNA preservation in calcified tissue is valid; and hydroxyapatite and collagen can be used to indicate whether DNA is present in the material. This is what would be expected if DNA is adsorbed to and stabilized by hydroxyapatite in calcified tissue, and collagen is part of the complex system that preserves DNA in bone tissue. Further, since collagen is the preferred material for radiocarbon dating, such bones may be a starting-point for a DNA analysis.

  • 21. Günther, Torsten
    et al.
    Malmström, Helena
    Svensson, Emma M.
    Omrak, Ayca
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Sánchez-Quinto, Federico
    Kılınç, Gülşah M.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Uppsala University, Sweden; Middle East Technical University, Turkey.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Fraser, Magdalena
    Edlund, Hanna
    Munters, Arielle R.
    Coutinho, Alexandra
    Simões, Luciana G.
    Vicente, Mario
    Sjölander, Anders
    Jansen Sellevold, Berit
    Jørgensen, Roger
    Claes, Peter
    Shriver, Mark D.
    Valdiosera, Cristina
    Netea, Mihai G.
    Apel, Jan
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Skar, Birgitte
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Population genomics of Mesolithic Scandinavia: Investigating early postglacial migration routes and high-latitude adaptation2018Inngår i: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 16, nr 1, artikkel-id e2003703Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Scandinavia was one of the last geographic areas in Europe to become habitable for humans after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). However, the routes and genetic composition of these postglacial migrants remain unclear. We sequenced the genomes, up to 57x coverage, of seven hunter-gatherers excavated across Scandinavia and dated from 9,500-6,000 years before present (BP). Surprisingly, among the Scandinavian Mesolithic individuals, the genetic data display an east-west genetic gradient that opposes the pattern seen in other parts of Mesolithic Europe. Our results suggest two different early postglacial migrations into Scandinavia: initially from the south, and later, from the northeast. The latter followed the ice-free Norwegian north Atlantic coast, along which novel and advanced pressure-blade stone-tool techniques may have spread. These two groups met and mixed in Scandinavia, creating a genetically diverse population, which shows patterns of genetic adaptation to high latitude environments. These potential adaptations include high frequencies of low pigmentation variants and a gene region associated with physical performance, which shows strong continuity into modern-day northern Europeans.

  • 22.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Amningsmönster under järnålder på södra Öland2015Inngår i: Grävda minnen: Från Skedemosse till Sandby borg / [ed] Kjell-Håkan Arnell, Ludvig Papmehl-Dufay, Kalmar: Kalmar läns museum, Länsstyrelsen Kalmar län , 2015, s. 72-83Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 23.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Conformity in diversity? Isotopic investigations of infant feeding practices in two Iron Age populations from southern Öland, Sweden2012Inngår i: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483, E-ISSN 1096-8644, Vol. 149, nr 2, s. 217-230Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the results of a study of infant diet at two Iron Age sites on the island of Öland, Sweden. The cemetery at Bjärby contained a large number of subadults who had survived the earliest years of life, whereas most individuals at Triberga had died by 6 months of age. To investigate whether differences in infant feeding could explain the different mortality rates, the carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur stable isotope ratios of bone and tooth dentin collagen from the two sites were analyzed. Twenty-two samples from Triberga and 102 from Bjärby yielded data that could be included in the carbon and nitrogen analysis. Twelve samples from Triberga and 42 from Bjärby were included in the sulfur analysis. The results for carbon (δ13C: Triberga X = -18.8, s.d. = 1.1; Bjärby X = -19.8, s.d. = 0.4), nitrogen (δ 15N: Triberga X = 12.9, s.d. = 1.5; Bjärby X = 13.4, s.d. = 1.4), and sulfur (δ34S: Triberga X = 8.1, s.d. = 1.1; Bjärby X = 5.8, s.d. = 1.3) suggest that diet was broadly similar at both sites and based on terrestrial resources. At Bjärby, females and high-status individuals consumed higher-trophic level protein than other males from early childhood onward. There was some indication that the contribution of marine resources to the diet may also have differed between the sexes at Triberga. No consistent differences in breast milk intake were observed between the two sites, but there was substantial variation at each. This variation may reflect an influence of gender and social status on infant feeding decisions.

  • 24.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. University of Tromso, Norway.
    Infant feeding practices at the Pitted Ware Culture site of Ajvide, Gotland2014Inngår i: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 42, s. 42-53Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The infant feeding practices used at the Pitted Ware Culture (PWC) site of Ajvide on the Baltic island of Gotland were investigated using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratio analysis. The PWC weremarine hunters with a seal-based economy who lived in the Baltic region during the Middle Neolithic, and were contemporary with the farming Funnel Beaker and Boat Axe Cultures. The carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen from adult females (14 individuals) and bone and dentine collagen from subadult individuals (23 individuals, 55 samples) from Ajvide were analysed. The results showed that the majority of infants continued breastfeeding into the third or fourth year of life. There was some variation in the types of supplementary foods used and the timing of their introduction, perhaps due to seasonal variation in the availability of different resources. One infant, a neonate, had carbonand nitrogen isotope ratios indicative of a much more terrestrial diet than usually consumed by the PWC, suggesting contact with the Neolithic farming populations in the Baltic region. Comparison of the results from Ajvide to those from other PWC sites in the Baltic region reveals that both adult and subadult dietary practices differed slightly between sites.

  • 25.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    The Milky Way: The implications of using animal milkproducts in infant feeding2012Inngår i: Anthropozoologica, ISSN 0761-3032, E-ISSN 2107-0881, Vol. 47, nr 2, s. 31-43Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal milks have been used in infant feeding for at least a few millennia, but this can only have become a common practice after the domestication of dairy animals during the Neolithic. Neolithic population increase has often been attributed to the effect of a reduction in breastfeeding duration on female fertility. It is possible, therefore, that animal milks were first introduced to the infant diet at this time as a replacement for the lost breastmilk. Milks are complex liquids and are species specific. The consumption of the milk of one species by the infants of another thus has implications for the welfare of those infants. This paper reviews some of the differences between the milks of three ruminant species and human milk and discusses what the health consequences of introducing these animal milks to the infant diet are likely to have been. It is argued that, except in extreme circumstances, animal milks would fail to adequately compensate for the reduction in breastmilk consumption. Fermented milk products could however have been valuable weaning foods if consumed alongside other iron-rich products.

  • 26.
    Kjellström, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Olofsson, Camilla
    Olson, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Stenbäck Lönnquist, Ulrika
    Welinder, Stig
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Barnen på Tibrandsholm2009Inngår i: Västerhus: Kapell, Kyrkogård och befolkning / [ed] Elisabeth, Iregren, Verner Alexandersen, Lars Redin, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademin , 2009, s. 236-243Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 27.
    Lidén, K.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Nordqvist, B
    Götherström, A
    Bendixen, E
    “The wet and the wild followed by the dry and the tame” – or did they occur at the same time?: Diet in Mesolithic–Neolithic southern Sweden2004Inngår i: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 78, nr 299, s. 23-33Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 28.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    A common language is the basis for sound collaboration2017Inngår i: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 50, nr 2, s. 124-126Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 29.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Angerbjörn, A.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Dietary change and stable isotopes: a model of growth and dormancy in cave bears1999Inngår i: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B-Biological Sciences, Vol. 266, nr 1430, s. 1779-1783Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to discuss dietary change over time by the use of stable isotopes, it is necessary to sort out the underlying processes in isotopic variation. Together with the dietary signal other processes have been investigated, namely metabolic processes, collagen turnover and physical growth. However, growth and collagen turnover time have so far been neglected in dietary reconstruction based on stable isotopes. An earlier study suggested that cave bears (Ursus spelaeus) probably gave birth to cubs during dormancy. We provide an estimate of the effect on stable isotopes of growth and metabolism and discuss collagen turnover in a population of cave bears. Based on a quantitative model, we hypothesized that bear cubs lactated their mothers during their first and second winters, but were fed solid food together with lactation during their first summer. This demonstrates the need to include physical growth, metabolism and collagen turnover in dietary reconstruction. Whereas the effects of diet and metabolism are due to fractionation, growth and collagen turnover are dilution processes.

  • 30.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Archaeology vs. archaeological science: Do we have a case?2013Inngår i: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, s. 11-20Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 31.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Mångkultur redan på stenåldern2009Inngår i: Forskning och framsteg, ISSN 0015-7937, nr 7, s. 44-47Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 32.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Response to comments: Archaeology vs. Archaeological Science2013Inngår i: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, s. 49-50Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 33.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Walking on the wild side: On cultural diversity and the Pitted Ware Culture along the Swedish east coast during the Middle Neolithic2007Inngår i: From Stonehenge to the Baltic: Living with cultural diversity in the third millennium BC, Archaeopress, Oxford , 2007, s. 1-11Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    There was a rich diversity in material culture during the Middle Neolithic in Scandinavia and the Baltic region, and the archaeological remains have therefore generally been labelled as one out of several parallel archaeological cultures. What these “cultures” represent, and whether or not they correspond to actual groups of people has long been debated. Particularly the Pitted Ware Culture has given rise to various hypotheses. By applying stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses on human and faunal skeletal remains from Pitted Ware contexts, and to compare these data with stable isotope data derived from sites of other cultural attribution, we were able to demonstrate that the Pitted Ware Culture in fact represents a separate group of people, not only distinguished by their characteristic pottery, but also by their food culture, which was mainly based on the utilization of seal. On the basis of stable isotope, radiocarbon and archaeological data, various other hypotheses regarding the Pitted Ware Culture and its stance vis-à-vis the Funnel Beaker and Battle Axe (Corded Ware) Cultures could thus be refuted.

  • 34.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Fjellström, Markus
    Wallerström, Thomas
    Nya resultat från Eskil Olssons Rounala-utgrävning 19152018Inngår i: Kunglig makt och samiska bosättningsmönster: Studier kring Väinö Tanners vinterbyteori / [ed] Thomas Wallerström, Oslo: Novus Forlag, 2018, s. 282-308Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 35.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Götherström, Anders
    Pushing it back. Dating the CCR5-delta 32 bp deletion to the Mesolithic in Sweden and it's implications for the Meso/Neo transition2006Inngår i: Documenta Praehistorica, nr XXXIII, s. 29-37Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 36.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lindholm, Veronica
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Breastfeeding patterns and diet in five 17th-century children from Sund, Åland Islands2012Inngår i: Stones, Bones & Thoughts: Festschrift in Honour of Milton Núñez / [ed] Sirpa Niinimäki, Anna-Kaisa Salmi, Jari-Matti Kuusela, Jari Okkonen, Oulu: [Milton Núñezin juhlakirjan toimituskunta] , 2012, s. 166-174Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Breastfeeding patterns and diet in five 17th-century children from Sund on the Åland Islands were studied by means of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of bone and teeth. Although all individuals derive from the same burial context, the high-status location inside the church, they nevertheless show differences in diet and breastfeeding patterns. We found two dietary groups: one consuming almost exclusively terrestrial protein resources, and the other a mixture of marine and terrestrial resources, with a predominance of terrestrial protein. The individual breastfeeding patterns show great variability – from no breastfeeding at all, to exclusive breastfeeding for ten months. Weaning varied both with regard to onset and pace. The overall diet indicates that the analysed individuals originate from two different environments, possibly mainland Åland and the outer archipelago, respectively.

  • 37.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Schutkowski, Holger
    University of Bradford.
    Sporstoffer og isotopanalyser2008Inngår i: Bilogisk antropologi: med human osteologi / [ed] Lynnerup, N., Bennike, P. & Iregren, E., Köpenhamn: Gyldendal , 2008, 1, s. 257-274Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 38.
    Lind, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Brooklyn College, USA.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Dating human cultural capacity using phylogenetic principles2013Inngår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 3, artikkel-id 1785Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans have genetically based unique abilities making complex culture possible; an assemblage of traits which we term cultural capacity. The age of this capacity has for long been subject to controversy. We apply phylogenetic principles to date this capacity, integrating evidence from archaeology, genetics, paleoanthropology, and linguistics. We show that cultural capacity is older than the first split in the modern human lineage, and at least 170,000 years old, based on data on hyoid bone morphology, FOXP2 alleles, agreement between genetic and language trees, fire use, burials, and the early appearance of tools comparable to those of modern hunter-gatherers. We cannot exclude that Neanderthals had cultural capacity some 500,000 years ago. A capacity for complex culture, therefore, must have existed before complex culture itself. It may even originated long before. This seeming paradox is resolved by theoretical models suggesting that cultural evolution is exceedingly slow in its initial stages.

  • 39.
    Linderholm, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Fornander, Elin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geologiska vetenskaper.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Increasing mobility at the Neolithic/ Bronze Age transition – sulphur isotope evidence from Öland, Sweden2014Inngår i: Internet Archaeology, ISSN 1363-5387, E-ISSN 1363-5387, Vol. 37Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this investigation is to look at the use of various aquatic, in this case marine, resources in relation to mobility during the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods. On the island of Öland, in the Baltic Sea, different archaeological cultures are represented in the form of material culture and skeletal remains at three sites. We have analysed δ34S values in human remains representing 36 individuals, as well as faunal remains. We investigated intra-individual patterns of mobility from childhood to adulthood, primarily focusing on a passage grave. Taking into account previously published dietary data that demonstrate a wide range of dietary practices involving aquatic resources, we applied a model to estimate the contribution of δ34S from terrestrial protein, to separate mobility from dietary changes, thereby identifying individuals who changed residence, as well as individuals with non-local origins. Evidence of mobility could be demonstrated at two sites. For the third site the consistently marine diet inhibits inferences on mobility based on δ34S analysis. Chronologically, the frequency of non-locals was highest during the Bronze Age, when the diet was very uniform and based on terrestrial resources.

  • 40. Linderholm, Anna
    et al.
    Fornander, Elin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geologiska vetenskaper.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Increasing mobility at the Neolithic/Bronze Age transition: sulphur isotope evidence from Öland, SwedenInngår i: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 41. Lira, Jaime
    et al.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Olaria, C
    Brändström Durling, Michael
    Gilbert, Tom
    Ellegren, Hans
    Willerslev, Eske
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Arsuaga, JL
    Götherström, Anders
    Ancient DNA reveals traces of Iberian Neolithic and Bronze age lineages in modern Iberian horses2010Inngår i: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 19, nr 1, s. 64-78Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple geographical regions have been proposed for the domestication of Equus caballus. It has been suggested, based on zooarchaeological and genetic analyses that wild horses from the Iberian Peninsula were involved in the process, and the overrepresentation of mitochondrial D1 cluster in modern Iberian horses supports this suggestion. To test this hypothesis, we analysed mitochondrial DNA from 22 ancient Iberian horse remains belonging to the Neolithic, the Bronze Age and the Middle Ages, against previously published sequences. Only the medieval Iberian sequence appeared in the D1 group. Neolithic and Bronze Age sequences grouped in other clusters, one of which (Lusitano group C) is exclusively represented by modern horses of Iberian origin. Moreover, Bronze Age Iberian sequences displayed the lowest nucleotide diversity values when compared with modern horses, ancient wild horses and other ancient domesticates using nonparametric bootstrapping analyses. We conclude that the excessive clustering of Bronze Age horses in the Lusitano group C, the observed nucleotide diversity and the local continuity from wild Neolithic Iberian to modern Iberian horses, could be explained by the use of local wild mares during an early Iberian domestication or restocking event, whereas the D1 group probably was introduced into Iberia in later historical times.

  • 42.
    Malmström, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Molnar, Petra
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Holmlund, Gunilla
    rättsmedicinalverket.
    Jakobsson, mattias
    Uppsala universitet.
    Götherström, Anders
    Uppsala universitet.
    High frequency of lactose intolerance in a prehistoric hunter-gatherer population in northern Europe2010Inngår i: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 10, s. 89-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Genes and culture are believed to interact, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence for the process. One candidate example that has been put forward is lactase persistence in adulthood, i.e. the ability to continue digesting the milk sugar lactose after childhood, facilitating the consumption of raw milk. This genetic trait is believed to have evolved within a short time period and to be related with the emergence of sedentary agriculture.

    Results: Here we investigate the frequency of an allele (-13910*T) associated with lactase persistence in a Neolithic Scandinavian population. From the 14 individuals originally examined, 10 yielded reliable results. We find that the T allele frequency was very low (5%) in this Middle Neolithic hunter-gatherer population, and that the frequency is dramatically different from the extant Swedish population (74%).

    Conclusions: We conclude that this difference in frequency could not have arisen by genetic drift and is either due to selection or, more likely, replacement of hunter-gatherer populations by sedentary agriculturalists.

  • 43. Malmström, Helena
    et al.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Durham University, UK.
    Skoglund, Pontus
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Sjödin, Per
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Holmlund, Gunilla
    Willerslev, Eske
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Götherstrom, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ancient mitochondrial DNA from the northern fringe of the Neolithic farming expansion in Europe sheds light on the dispersion process2015Inngår i: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 370, nr 1660, artikkel-id 20130373Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Neolithization process started around 12 000 years ago in the Near East. The introduction of agriculture spread north and west throughout Europe and a key question has been if this was brought about by migrating individuals, by an exchange of ideas or a by a mixture of these. The earliest farming evidence in Scandinavia is found within the Funnel Beaker Culture complex (Trichterbecherkultur, TRB) which represents the northernmost extension of Neolithic farmers in Europe. The TRB coexisted for almost a millennium with hunter-gatherers of the Pitted Ware Cultural complex (PWC). If migration was a substantial part of the Neolithization, even the northerly TRB community would display a closer genetic affinity to other farmer populations than to hunter-gatherer populations. We deep-sequenced the mitochondrial hypervariable region 1 from seven farmers (six TRB and one Battle Axe complex, BAC) and 13 hunter-gatherers (PWC) and authenticated the sequences using postmortem DNA damage patterns. A comparison with 124 previously published sequences from prehistoric Europe shows that the TRB individuals share a close affinity to Central European farmer populations, and that they are distinct from hunter-gatherer groups, including the geographically close and partially contemporary PWC that show a close affinity to the European Mesolithic hunter-gatherers.

  • 44. Nelson, D. E.
    et al.
    Angerbjörn, A.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Liden, K.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Turk, I.
    Stable isotopes and the metabolism of the European cave bear1998Inngår i: Oecologia, Vol. 116, nr 1-2, s. 177-181Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Isotopic analyses of fossil bones of the extinct European cave bear indicate that this animal was a hibernator with the same unusual metabolic processes as some modern bear species. This finding provides useful biological and archaeological information on an extinct species, and the methods themselves may prove generally useful in studies of the metabolisms of modern bears, other hibernators, and perhaps of starving animals.

  • 45. Niemi, Marianna
    et al.
    Blauer, Auli
    Iso-Touru, Terhi
    Harjula, Janne
    Nyström Edmark, Veronica
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Rannamaee, Eve
    Lougas, Lembi
    Sajantila, Antti
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Taavitsainen, Jussi-Pekka
    Temporal Fluctuation in North East Baltic Sea Region Cattle Population Revealed by Mitochondrial and Y-Chromosomal DNA Analyses2015Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, nr 5, artikkel-id e0123821Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Ancient DNA analysis offers a way to detect changes in populations over time. To date, most studies of ancient cattle have focused on their domestication in prehistory, while only a limited number of studies have analysed later periods. Conversely, the genetic structure of modern cattle populations is well known given the undertaking of several molecular and population genetic studies. Results Bones and teeth from ancient cattle populations from the North-East Baltic Sea region dated to the Prehistoric (Late Bronze and Iron Age, 5 samples), Medieval (14), and Post-Medieval (26) periods were investigated by sequencing 667 base pairs (bp) from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and 155 bp of intron 19 in the Y-chromosomal UTY gene. Comparison of maternal (mtDNA haplotypes) genetic diversity in ancient cattle (45 samples) with modern cattle populations in Europe and Asia (2094 samples) revealed 30 ancient mtDNA haplotypes, 24 of which were shared with modern breeds, while 6 were unique to the ancient samples. Of seven Y-chromosomal sequences determined from ancient samples, six were Y2 and one Y1 haplotype. Combined data including Swedish samples from the same periods (64 samples) was compared with the occurrence of Y-chromosomal haplotypes in modern cattle (1614 samples). Conclusions The diversity of haplogroups was highest in the Prehistoric samples, where many haplotypes were unique. The Medieval and Post-Medieval samples also show a high diversity with new haplotypes. Some of these haplotypes have become frequent in modern breeds in the Nordic Countries and North-Western Russia while other haplotypes have remained in only a few local breeds or seem to have been lost. A temporal shift in Y-chromosomal haplotypes from Y2 to Y1 was detected that corresponds with the appearance of new mtDNA haplotypes in the Medieval and Post-Medieval period. This suggests a replacement of the Prehistoric mtDNA and Y- chromosomal haplotypes by new types of cattle.

  • 46. Niemi, Marianna
    et al.
    Blauer, Auli
    Iso-Touru, Terhi
    Nyström, Veronica
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Harjula, Janne
    Taavitsainen, Jussi-Pekka
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Kantanen, Juha
    Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomal diversity in ancient populations of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in Finland: comparison with contemporary sheep breeds2013Inngår i: Genetics Selection Evolution, ISSN 0999-193X, E-ISSN 1297-9686, Vol. 45, s. 2-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several molecular and population genetic studies have focused on the native sheep breeds of Finland. In this work, we investigated their ancestral sheep populations from Iron Age, Medieval and Post-Medieval periods by sequencing a partial mitochondrial DNA D-loop and the 5'-promoter region of the SRY gene. We compared the maternal (mitochondrial DNA haplotypes) and paternal (SNP oY1) genetic diversity of ancient sheep in Finland with modern domestic sheep populations in Europe and Asia to study temporal changes in genetic variation and affinities between ancient and modern populations. Results: A 523-bp mitochondrial DNA sequence was successfully amplified for 26 of 36 sheep ancient samples i.e. five, seven and 14 samples representative of Iron Age, Medieval and Post-Medieval sheep, respectively. Genetic diversity was analyzed within the cohorts. This ancient dataset was compared with present-day data consisting of 94 animals from 10 contemporary European breeds and with GenBank DNA sequence data to carry out a haplotype sharing analysis. Among the 18 ancient mitochondrial DNA haplotypes identified, 14 were present in the modern breeds. Ancient haplotypes were assigned to the highly divergent ovine haplogroups A and B, haplogroup B being the major lineage within the cohorts. Only two haplotypes were detected in the Iron Age samples, while the genetic diversity of the Medieval and Post-Medieval cohorts was higher. For three of the ancient DNA samples, Y-chromosome SRY gene sequences were amplified indicating that they originated from rams. The SRY gene of these three ancient ram samples contained SNP G-oY1, which is frequent in modern north-European sheep breeds. Conclusions: Our study did not reveal any sign of major population replacement of native sheep in Finland since the Iron Age. Variations in the availability of archaeological remains may explain differences in genetic diversity estimates and patterns within the cohorts rather than demographic events that occurred in the past. Our ancient DNA results fit well with the genetic context of domestic sheep as determined by analyses of modern north-European sheep breeds.

  • 47.
    Nyström, Veronica
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Dalén, Love
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Vartanyan, Sergey
    Department of Geography, Herzen University, nab. Moyki, 48, St Petersburg.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Temporal genetic change in the last remaining population of woolly mammoth2010Inngår i: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 277, nr 1692, s. 2331-2337Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    During the Late Pleistocene, the woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) experienced a series of local extinctions generally attributed to human predation or environmental change. Some small and isolated populations did however survive far into the Holocene. Here, we investigated the genetic consequences of the isolation of the last remaining mammoth population on Wrangel Island. We analysed 741 bp of the mitochondrial DNA and found a loss of genetic variation in relation to the isolation event, probably caused by a demographic bottleneck or a founder event. However, in spite of ca 5000 years of isolation, we did not detect any further loss of genetic variation. Together with the relatively high number of mitochondrial haplotypes on Wrangel Island near the final disappearance, this suggests a sudden extinction of a rather stable population.

  • 48.
    Nyström, Veronica
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Humphrey, Joanne
    Skoglund, Pontus
    McKeown, Niall J.
    Vartanyan, Sergey
    Shaw, Paul W.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Barnes, Ian
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Lister, Adrian
    Dalen, Love
    Microsatellite genotyping reveals end-Pleistocene decline in mammoth autosomal genetic variation2012Inngår i: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 21, nr 14, s. 3391-3402Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The last glaciation was a dynamic period with strong impact on the demography of many species and populations. In recent years, mitochondrial DNA sequences retrieved from radiocarbon-dated remains have provided novel insights into the history of Late Pleistocene populations. However, genotyping of loci from the nuclear genome may provide enhanced resolution of population-level changes. Here, we use four autosomal microsatellite DNA markers to investigate the demographic history of woolly mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius) in north-eastern Siberia from before 60 000 years ago up until the species final disappearance c. 4000 years ago. We identified two genetic groups, implying a marked temporal genetic differentiation between samples with radiocarbon ages older than 12 thousand radiocarbon years before present (ka) and those younger than 9 ka. Simulation-based analysis indicates that this dramatic change in genetic composition, which included a decrease in individual heterozygosity of approximately 30%, was due to a multifold reduction in effective population size. A corresponding reduction in genetic variation was also detected in the mitochondrial DNA, where about 65% of the diversity was lost. We observed no further loss in genetic variation during the Holocene, which suggests a rapid final extinction event.

  • 49.
    Nyström, Veronica
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Humphrey, Joanne
    Skoglund, Pontus
    McKeown, Niall
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Vartanyan, Sergey
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Barnes, Ian
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Lister, Adrian
    Dalén, Love
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Microsatellite genotyping reveals end-Pleistocene shift in mammoth autosomal genetic variationManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 50. Skar, Birgitte
    et al.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Sellevold, Berit
    A submerged Mesolithic grave site reveals remains of the first Norwegian seal hunters2016Inngår i: Marine Ventures: Archaeological Perspectives on Human-Sea Relations / [ed] Hein Bjartmann Bjerck et al., Sheffield: Equinox Publishing, 2016, s. 225-239Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Submerged Mesolithic settlement sites and graves have shown to provide repositories of well-preserved organic remains particularly in the Baltic Sea region. Although marine Stone Age archaeology In Norway is in its infancy it has already led to discoveries that shed new light on Middle Mesolithic livelihood and death, so far unknown from the terrestrial archaeological record. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) analyzed from individuals from submerged burials on the Hummervikholmen site in southern Norway reveal that the deceased had lived off a diet consisting of more than 80% marine protein from the highest trophic level. The find circumstances of the three to five individuals, found west of Kristiansand, confirm the existence of a Middle Mesolithic burial tradition and indicate that this hunter-gatherer population in southern Norway possessed boat technology. The finds highlight a period during the Middle Mesolithic of Norway where cultural change so far has only been indicated in the lithic technology.

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