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  • 1.
    Andersen, Lisa M. J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Manouilenko, Irina
    Nylander, Lena
    Edgar, Johan
    Ritvo, Riva Ariella
    Ritvo, Edward
    Bejerot, Susanne
    The Swedish Version of the Ritvo Autism and Asperger Diagnostic Scale: Revised (RAADS-R): A Validation Study of a Rating Scale for Adults2011In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 41, no 12, 1635-1645 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a paucity of diagnostic instruments for adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study evaluates the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Ritvo Autism and Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R), an 80-item self-rating scale designed to assist clinicians diagnosing ASD in adults. It was administered to 75 adults with ASD and 197 comparison cases. Also, a subset completed the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ). Three out of four subscales had high internal consistency. Sensitivity was 91% and specificity was 93%. The ASD subjects had significantly higher mean scores on all subscales. ASD females had higher scores than ASD males on the sensory motor subscale, a dimension not included in the AQ. RAADS-R showed promising test re-test reliability.

  • 2.
    Andersson-Stråberg, Teresia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Attitudes towards individualized pay among human service workers in the public sector2005In: Change and quality in human service work: dedicated to the work of André Büssing / [ed] Christian Korunka & Peter Hoffmann, Munich: Rainer Hampp Verlag, 2005, 1, 67-82 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The work climate has gone through immense changes during the recent decades, due to industrial reformation, economic recessions, technical advancements, and an increased global competition (Howard, 1995). The so-called New Public Management movement has inspired many European countries and has among other things led to changes in the way that wages are distributed (Pfeffer, 1997; Wikman, 2001). Wage distribution systems partly based on individual performance are increasingly taking over traditional wage distribution systems in many organizations in Europe (OECD, 1995). Employers appear to have great expectations that individualized performance-based wages will bring about higher employee motivation and performance etc (Lawler, 1991). The aim of this study is to investigate attitudes towards individualized pay among human service workers in the public sector and try to identify some of the factors behind their attitudes. Questionnaire data show that employees with the most positive attitudes towards individualized pay already had part of their salary based on performance. A person’s attitude towards individualized pay also seems to be positively related to perceived workload and mental health complaints. Older employees and employees with longer tenure reported the most negative attitudes towards individualized performance based wages. This study contributes to a better understanding of some of the factors underlying attitudes towards individually based wages among human service employees.

  • 3.
    Andersson-Stråberg, Teresia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The impact of pay-related justice perceptions on employee work attitudes, psychological well-being, and work-related behavior.2006In: 7th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology.: Dublin, Ireland, November 8-10, 2006., 2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The use of individualized pay has increased during the last decades. Employers expect individualized pay systems to bring about more efficient and motivated employees, who are willing to heighten their work efforts in order to achieve organizational goals. A certain amount of cooperation and communication between supervisor and employee throughout the different parts in the individualized pay-setting process is required. Although research on leadership and its impact on employees perceptions are extensive (Pfeffer, 1997), there is need to study whether interpersonal competency of leaders in the pay-setting process affects outcomes such as employee satisfaction, performance and well-being. It would be reasonable to assume that employees who have a positive view of the supervisor-employee relationship and regards the supervisor’s conduct in the pay-setting process as fair, also would experience a greater satisfaction, commitment, and are less inclined to quit than individuals with more negative perceptions of the relationship with their supervisor and his/her conduct in the pay-setting process. Questionnaire data was collected among 721 health care workers. The response rate was 81 percent (N=582). The proportion of women was 88 percent, and the mean age 48 (SD=10) years. The results indicate that a clear communication concerning expectations and goals is probably the most important supervisor quality for all five outcomes, followed by supervisor legitimacy and competency, respectful treatment and gender equality.

  • 4.
    Baraldi, Stephan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jawaid Kalyal, H.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Importance of Commitment to Change in Public Reform: an Example from Pakistan2010In: Journal of Change Management, ISSN 1469-7017, E-ISSN 1479-1811, Vol. 10, no 4, 347-368 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The public sectors in many developing countries have undergone major restructuring over the past decades. Earlier research suggests that such restructuring is inherently linked to feelings of ambiguity and insecurity among employees, undermining behavioral support for change, and thus, chances of change success. Using survey data from a restructured public sector organization in Pakistan, this study investigated the mediating role of commitment to change on the relationship between role ambiguity/job insecurity and behavioral support for change. The results show that role ambiguity and job insecurity were negatively related to both commitment to change and behavioral support for change. More importantly, however, the results support the notion that the negative effects of role ambiguity and job insecurity on behavioral support for change are fully mediated by individuals’ commitment to change. The study emphasizes the importance of mobilizing commitment to change in restructuring processes.

  • 5.
    Bernhard Oettel, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Career continuance and transfer of competencies after job transitions: Insights from a Swedish study2015In: Handbook of research on sustainable careers / [ed] Ans de Vos, Beatrice I.J.M. van der Heijden, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, 381-397 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Book information: What is a sustainable career and how can individuals and organizations develop pathways that lead to them? With current levels of global unemployment and the need for life-long learning and employability enhancement these questions assume a pressing significance. With twenty-eight chapters from leading scholars, the Handbook of Research on Sustainable Careers makes an important contribution to our understanding of sustainable careers and lays the foundation for the direction of future research.

  • 6.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stengård, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Östergren, P-O
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Inlåsning, anställningsbarhet och välbefinnande efter en omorganisation2013In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 19, no 4, 101-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under perioder där arbetsmarknaden erbjuder färre alternativ är det troligt att fler människor accepterar arbetsplatser där de inte trivs eller stannar kvar på arbeten som de inte vill ha och känner sig inlåsta i. Tidigare forskning har kopplat inlåsning till sämre välbefinnande. Hur inlåsning och välbefinnande förändras när människor byter jobb är mindre känt. Föreliggande studie belyser förändringar i inlåsning, upplevd anställningsbarhet och välbefinnande vid en svensk myndighet efter en organisationsförändring som medfört organisationsinterna arbetsplatsbyten. Resultaten visar på negativa effekter av inlåsning: att stanna kvar på eller flytta till en arbetsplats som man inte önskar ha i framtiden är inte gynnsamt för hälsan.

  • 7.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stengård, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    How Are They Now?: Managers’ Well-Being and Organizational Attitudes after the Restructuring of Their Job Positions in a Swedish Governmental Agency2014In: Book of Proceedings, 11th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology: Looking at the past-planning for the future: Capitalizing on OHP multidisciplinarity / [ed] N.J.A. Andreou, A. Jain, D. Hollis, J. Hassard & K. Teoh, Nottingham, UK: European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology , 2014, 257-258 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Planned organizational changes often aim to secure organizational sustainability through the means of optimising structures and strategies. However, for employees such organizational changes often imply job changes and the loss of familiar routines. 

    Plausibly, this increases perceived uncertainty and may have negative effects on employees’ organizational attitudes and well-being during the change. If levels of well-being and organizational attitudes are negatively affected in the long run, this may pose threats to the initial aim to secure organizational sustainability. This may even more so be the case if employees such as managers show long-term negative reactions, since managers are in key positions to promote the organizations aims vis à vis employees. Whereas there is much research on employees’ reactions towards organizational change, few studies have specifically analysed managers’ reactions at different organizational levels. Also, many studies focus on certain aspects of uncertainty, but few inspect the consequences of (unwanted) job, task or responsibility changes.

    Accordingly, this study aimed to investigate managers’ well-being and organizational attitudes after organizational changes of management structures. More specifically, it studied how changes in managers’ organizational attitudes and well-being related to changes in job positions, tasks and responsibilities shortly after the organizational restructuring, and more than a year later.

    The study used questionnaire data collected from managers in a Swedish governmental agency undergoing structural changes. During this period all managers had to go through a new recruitment process. Questionnaires were sent out at T1 (summer 2011, one month before the change process started), T2 (spring 2012, two months after the organizational change was finalised) and T3 (summer 2013, 18 months after the organizational change was finalised).

    Data are currently being analysed cross-sectionally (N = 173, 144, and 125) and longitudinally (N = 91 with complete date for t1, t2 and t3). The preliminary findings show the percentage of managers who rated their job positions favorably steadily decreased from T1 to T3, and this related to a significant decrease in self-rated health and job satisfaction. Interestingly, perceptions of tasks and responsibilities of their old and new jobs were still rather similar at T2. How the perceptions of changes in tasks and responsibilities relate to attitudes and well-being a year later (T3) is currently under analysis.

  • 8.
    Berntson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Enkätmetodik2016Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Enkätmetodik ger såväl teoretisk som praktisk kunskap om enkätundersökningar från att identifiera ett problem och formulera lämpliga frågor, till att analysera och tolka resultatet. Boken har ett evidensbaserat perspektiv där läsaren får lära sig olika verktyg som bidrar till undersökningens tillförlitlighet.

    Fokus ligger på metodiken, som förklaras och sätts in i sitt sammanhang med hjälp av många exempel, faktarutor och tydliga beskrivningar. Läsaren får således god förståelse för centrala områden såsom mätteori, reliabilitet, validitet och faktoranalys.

  • 9.
    Berntson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Härenstam, Annika
    Gender Differences in Career Prospects: Does Work-Family Conflict Matter for Perceived Employability and Career Opportunities?2014In: Book of Proceedings, 11th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology: Looking at the past-planning for the future: Capitalizing on OHP multidisciplinarity / [ed] N.J.A. Andreou, A. Jain, D. Hollis, J. Hassard & K. Teoh, Nottingham, UK: European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology , 2014, 237- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender equality in the labourmarket has been emphasized as an important factor several times in European community (EU Commission, 1997; 2010). Nevertheless, differences in career opportunities have been found in previous research, indicating that women report more barriers then men regarding career aspects (Hawley McWirther, 1997). In this respect, a number of possible explanations has been put forward, for example work-family conflict (WFC) (Gali Cinnamon, 2006). In the present study we are interested in investigating possible predictors of career opportunities and more specifically the aim of the present study is to investigate antecedents of career opportunities and perceived employability.

    The present study comprised a representative sample of 1,609 Swedish workers (716 men and 883 women) in the ages of 26 to 51, who answered two questionnaires, one in 2005 and one in 2006. The study comprised questions regarding career opportunities and perceived employability (outcomes) and age, mental well-being, education, tenure, children at home, working hours (per week) and WFC (predictors). The data was analyzed by means of a regression analysis.

    Preliminary results indicate that women reported lower levels of employability as well as career opportunities. They also had a higher level of education, shorter tenure and worked fewer hours per week. Regarding the regression analysis, the results displayed a significant association between WFC and the outcomes for men but not for women. For women part-time work predicted both outcomes. It could also be found that tenure had a negative effect on both outcomes, suggesting that for both men and women (although somewhat stronger for men) working longer in one organization affects perceived career prospects in a negative way. In addition, the results indicate that subjective mental well-being is an important predictor for employability as well as for career opportunities.

    The results confirm earlier studies in that women report more career barriers. We also find it interesting that the results from the preliminary analyses suggest that WFC is primarily a problem for men. For women, the number of hours per week seems to be more important.

  • 10.
    Berntson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Investigating the relationship between employability and self-efficacy: A cross-lagged analysis2008In: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 1359-432X, E-ISSN 1464-0643, Vol. 7, no 4, 413-425 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The construct of employability has been conceptually related to self-efficacy in different ways. Employability has sometimes been regarded as an equivalent to self-efficacy, or as a distinct but related phenomenon. Since the relationship between the two phenomena has not been subjected to empirical scrutiny, the aim of the present study is to analyze whether self-efficacy and employability are two distinct but related constructs, and if they are, to investigate the direction of their relationship. The data (N = 1730) were collected through a two-wave longitudinal survey with one year between each data collection (2005 and 2006). The results of confirmatory factor analysis showed that the measures of employability and self-efficacy were distinct from one another, within and over measurement points, indicating that these are related but separate constructs. The results of latent variable cross-lagged analysis showed that employability predicted subsequent self-efficacy, even after controlling for age, gender, educational level, and regional differences. Thus, employability is not an expression of efficacy beliefs, but rather, the strengthening of employability perceptions may have beneficial effects on more general efficacy beliefs.

  • 11.
    Berntson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Should I Stay or Should I Go?: Does Employability Alter the Exit, Voice, Loyalty and Neglect Reactions to Job Insecurity?2008In: Small Group Meeting, Leuven, Belgium, September 17-19, 2008., 2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Exit, voice, loyalty, and neglect as employee responses to companies in decline have been investigated in several studies. When individuals work and act in an environment that is turbulent with organizational changes, volatile working conditions and job insecurity, they may respond to these environmental circumstances either by leaving the organization (exit), by staying and actively affect the situation (voice), by staying and be loyal to management’s decisions (loyalty) or by staying and being passive (neglect). With respect to the individualization of the labour market, it cannot be expected that people react in similar ways to organizational events. Rather, it has been suggested that employability may have a moderating effect on the responses of for example job insecurity. Consequently, the aim of the present study is to investigate if employability moderates the effects of job insecurity on the outcomes of the framework of exit, voice, loyalty, and neglect. Data (questionnaires) was gathered in four different companies (administrative staff of a manufacturing company, one accounting firm, administrative section of a community, teachers of a community), comprising 725 white-collar workers. The data of the present study was analysed by means of hierarchical regression analyses, one for each of the four outcome variables. The results indicate that individuals who are high in employability may have greater opportunities for gaining control over their working life. Job insecurity was found to be associated with increased exit as well as with decreased voice and loyalty, although these effects were stronger among individuals who perceived themselves to be employable. Thus, people that perceived high levels of employability, as opposed to those who perceived lower levels of employability, under the circumstance of high job insecurity also reported stronger exit intentions together with weaker tendencies to use their voice and be loyal to their company. No association was found between neglect and job insecurity or employability. In conclusion, instead of making employees more likely to use voice in times of uncertainty, employability appears to primarily induce vocational mobility.

  • 12.
    Berntson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The moderating role of employability in the association between job insecurity and exit, voice, loyalty and neglect2010In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 31, no 2, 215-230 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exit, voice, loyalty, or neglect as employee responses to organizations in decline have been investigated in several studies. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether employability moderates the effects of job insecurity on exit, voice, loyalty and neglect. The results, based on questionnaire data from white-collar workers in Sweden (N = 725), indicate that individuals who are high in employability may have greater opportunities for gaining control over their working life. Job insecurity was found to be associated with increased exit as well as with decreased voice and loyalty, although these effects were stronger among individuals who perceived themselves to be employable. Thus, instead of making employees more likely to use voice in times of uncertainty, employability appears to primarily induce vocational mobility.

  • 13.
    Berntson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Department of Education.
    The relationship between self-efficacy and employability.2006In: The 7th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology: Dublin, Ireland, November 8-10, 2006., 2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Several researchers have emphasized that the labour market is being restructured and characterized by more frequently occurring organizational changes. In this sense, it has also been maintained that employability is a gradually more important asset for individuals in contemporary working life. It has been argued that the modern way of job security should be seen in the light of employability, the so called employability security, where security comes from the feeling of being able to get a new job rather than from the feeling of maintaining the current employment position.

    Employability is defined as an individual’s perception of his or her possibilities of getting new employment. Feeling employable thus reflects the perception of having great possibilities to get a new job, if necessary. In earlier research employability has been described as a concept depending on individual assets as well as contextual prerequisites. For instance, Fugate, Kinicki and Ashforth (2004) argued that employability is comprised of three distinct dimensions, one motivational component, one component reflecting adaptability and a third component formed by the human and social capital. Berntson, Sverke and Marklund (in press), on the other hand, argued that employability also shall be seen in the light of the context of the individual. Thus, national economic situation as well as local labour markets are important predictors of an individual’s employability.

    Although the concept of employability has been argued to be dependent on individual assets, few or no studies have been made to investigate if employability is something else than a dispositional characteristic such as efficacy beliefs. It is important to know if employability shall be viewed as a dispositional factor or if it shall be seen as something apart from dispositional traits when it comes to reinforcing employability. The first aim of the present study is to investigate if employability is a concept distinct from self-efficacy. It is however also of importance to investigate if employability gives rise to efficacy beliefs or if it is feelings of efficacy that influence the levels of employability. A second aim, therefore, is to investigate if self-efficacy affects employability or the other way around.

    Questionnaire data is being used comprising white-collar workers in a Swedish organization. The results of the initial confirmatory factor analysis (on Wave 1 data) indicate that employability is distinct from self-efficacy. Longitudinal data are being collected with the specific aim of performing a cross-lagged analysis. However, the cross-sectional data imply that the two concepts are positively correlated, indicating that individuals experiencing high levels of self-efficacy also report higher levels of employability.

  • 14. De Cuyper, Nele
    et al.
    De Witte, Hans
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. North West University, South Africa.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Felt Job Insecurity and Union Membership: the Case of Temporary Workers2014In: Drustvena istrazivanja: Journal for General Social Issues, ISSN 1330-0288, Vol. 23, no 4, 577-591 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates the relationship between felt jobinsecurity and union membership accounting for potential differencesbetween temporary and permanent workers. Consistentwith the idea that felt job insecurity leads workers to seek socialprotection from the unions, and with earlier studies, we hypothesizea positive relationship between felt job insecurity and unionmembership (Hypothesis 1). Furthermore, we argue that thisrelationship may be stronger among temporary compared withpermanent workers (Hypothesis 2): insecure temporary workersare in a situation of 'double vulnerability', hence they have strongmotives for unionization. Hypotheses are tested in a cross--sectional sample of 560 Flemish (Dutch-speaking part ofBelgium) workers. Our results were as follows: the relationshipbetween felt job insecurity and union membership was not significant.The interaction term between contract type and felt jobinsecurity was significantly related to union membership: the relationship between felt job insecurity and union membership waspositive among temporary workers, but not among permanentworkers. This pattern of results may inspire unions to target futurerecruitment strategies on temporary workers. A route for futureresearch could be to test our hypotheses also longitudinally.

  • 15. De Witte, Hans
    et al.
    De Cuyper, Nele
    Handaja, Yasmin
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Associations between quantitative and qualitative job insecurity and well-being: A Test in Belgian banks2010In: International Studies of Management and Organization, ISSN 0020-8825, Vol. 40, no 1, 40-56 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most studies on the relationship between job insecurity and well-being have focused on the effects of employees’ overall concerns about the continued existence of the job as such (quantitative job insecurity). Comparatively little research has examined perceived threats to valued job features (qualitative job insecurity). The overall aim of this study was to investigate the relative strength of associations of quantitative and qualitative job insecurity with job-related (job satisfaction and burnout) and general (psychological distress and psychosomatic complaints) well-being, and health-related behavior (absence and medical consultation). Controlling for socio-demographics, negative affectivity and job characteristics, these relationships were tested in a sample of 7,146 Belgian employees from the banking sector. The results suggest that both quantitative and qualitative job insecurity are important stressors.

  • 16. De Witte, Hans
    et al.
    Goslinga, Sjoerd
    Chirumbolo, Antonio
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Baanonzekerheid als schending van het psychologisch contract bij vakbondsleden: Gevolgen voor vakbondsattitudes en opzegintentie in België en Nederland. / Job insecurity as violation of the psychological contract among trade union members: consequences on attitudes towards unions and the intention to resign membership in Belgium and the Netherlands.2005In: Gedrag en Organisatie, ISSN 0921-5077, Vol. 18, no 1, 1-20 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article the consequences of job insecurity among union members are explored. Having established that most employees have instrumental motives for joining a union, and using psychological contract theory, we hypothesize that job insecurity among union members correlates with a lower level of perceived union support, lower satisfaction with the union, reduced (affective) commitment towards the union, and a higher intention to resign union membership. These hypotheses were tested in Belgium and the Netherlands. Evidence was found to support the assumed association between job insecurity and a reduction in perceived union support. In Belgium, job insecurity was also associated with reduced union satisfaction and intention to resign membership. In neither country job insecurity was associated with union commitment. These results partly support the hypothesis that union members experience job insecurity as a violation of their psychological contract with the union.

  • 17. De Witte, Hans
    et al.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    ‘Objective’ vs ‘Subjective’ Job Insecurity: Consequences of Temporary Work for Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment in Four European Countries2011In: Industrial Relations / [ed] Marian Baird, Rae Cooper, Bradon Ellem, Russell D. Lansbury, London: Sage Publications, 2011, 343-372 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Book Description: This major work offers a broad insight into the field of industrial relations, taking into account the economic, political, and social influences and the relative power of capital and labor that shape relations between people at work. Aided by an international editorial advisory board, the collection takes a broad interdisciplinary approach, which includes the interactions between employers, workers, their collective organizations, and the state. Key concepts and foundational readings on industrial relations are covered by the first volume, while the second comprises readings on the principal actors in industrial relations. The third volume focuses on industrial relations processes and conflict resolution, leaving the fourth and final volume to deal with outcomes of the industrial relations processes.

  • 18. De Witte, Hans
    et al.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    ‘Objective’ vs. ‘Subjective’ job insecurity: Consequences of temporary work for job satisfaction and organizational commitment in four European countries2003In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 24, no 2, 149-188 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution analyses whether temporary work and (the subjective perception of) job insecurity are associated with a reduction in job satisfaction and organizational commitment, as proposed in the literature. An interaction between temporary work and job insecurity is also tested. Data from four European countries (Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy and Sweden) are used to test the robustness of the hypotheses. The results show that temporary work is not associated with a reduction in job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Job insecurity is associated with a lower score on both outcome variables, as hypothesized. In two countries, an interaction was found: job insecurity was only associated with a reduction in job satisfaction and organizational commitment among workers with a permanent contract, suggesting that the psychological contract was violated for this category of workers.

  • 19. De Witte, Hans
    et al.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Van Ruysseveldt, Joris
    Goslinga, Sjoerd
    Chirumbolo, Antonio
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Job Insecurity, Union Support and Intentions to Resign Membership: A Psychological Contract Perspective2008In: European Journal of Industrial Relations, ISSN 0959-6801, Vol. 14, no 1, 85-103 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article uses psychological contract theory to explore the consequences of job insecurity among union members. We hypothesize that the perception of job insecurity will correlate with a lower level of perceived union support and a higher intention to resign union membership. We also test whether the relationship between job insecurity and membership turnover is mediated by (a lack of) perceived union support. In Belgium, Italy and the Netherlands, an association is found between job insecurity and a reduction in perceived union support, and between job insecurity and the intention to resign membership; this association is also fully mediated by (a lack of) perceived union support. None of these hypotheses are corroborated in Sweden. We discuss implications of these findings for future research and for unions in Europe.

  • 20.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The moderating influence of the demand-control-support model on the relationships between organisational justice and well-being2011In: 2nd International Workshop on Insights in Organisational Justice and Behavioural Ethics, 27-28 June 2011, Birmingham, UK, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the post-industrial working life - characterised by job intensification, blurred boundaries between work life and non-work life and postponed statutory retirement age - it is more necessary than ever that organisations and employees find a way to work highly efficiently and at the same time in a sustainable manner.

  • 21.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Interaction effects of organisational justice and work characteristics: cross-sectional and longitudinal relations to work attitudes and employee’ well-being2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Work characteristics have often been the focus in research intending to understand organisational behaviour and how employee health and well-being may be shaped by characteristics of the work environment. Both perceptions of organisational justice as well as perceptions of work characteristics pertain to the work environment domain; both have also been handled as psychosocial predictors for health outcomes and shown to be related to relevant work and health outcomes. Missing from the current picture is how these two different domains of the work environment interact, and together shape work and health outcomes. When employees make a judgment about the organisation as a whole – that the organisation is fair and can be trusted – and because of this are inclined to engage in their work, and may even feel healthy and happy at their workplace, does it matter what work characteristics they face? Previous studies show a mixed picture, with only few studies available at all, some studies with no significant interaction effects, most of the studies done on the control component, very few studies that investigated the interplay with the demand and support component. Also, the previous studies only studied relations with cross-sectional data, and there is not one study that predicted work and health outcomes. The current study first reviews the limited available evidence on the combined effect of justice and work characteristics, and then tests interaction effects between organisational justice and the Job-Demand-Control-Support model components as predictors of two work outcomes (organisational commitment, intention to stay) and two health outcomes (mental health, somatic health). Data from Swedish accountants are used, cross-sectionally and longitudinally after one year. While not all interactions are significant, there are significant interactions for each of the work characteristics, for each of the four outcome variables and for both time points. The results are presented and interpreted with the help of four different mechanisms: reduction, amplification, aggravation, and compensation.

  • 22.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Problem- and emotion-focused coping in a demanding working life.2006In: The VIth International Conference on Occupational Stress and Health: Miami, 2-4 March 2006., 2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In the constant strive for competitiveness, organizations try to deliver their products and services at a faster pace and with higher quality, resulting in increased demands for employee effectiveness and competence. High demands are known to be a risk factor for stress. Employees who perceive their work situation as stressful are likely to experience negative consequences, such as negative work-related attitudes and deteriorated health. The extent of the negative consequences of a stressful work situation most likely depends on the strategies employees use to cope with the situation. Some studies indicate that problem-focused strategies may be the most effective to cope with stressful situations, while other studies have shown emotion-focused strategies to be more effective. The aim of this study is to further investigate the role of problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies in reducing negative consequences of the work stressors quantitative and qualitative workload for work-related attitudes and health. The study also investigates potential synergy effects of a combination of the two coping strategies.

    Data was collected by questionnaires in March 2005. The sample consists of 252 salaried employees (response rate 86 %) who work in a Swedish firm of accountants. Moderated multiple regression analyses were conducted for each outcome (job satisfaction, organizational commitment, well-being and physical health). Age and gender were used as control variables.

    The results showed that both problem- and emotion-focused coping strategies could reduce the negative effects of high workload. Two-way interactions indicated that more problem-focused coping moderated the relation between workload and well-being, while emotion-focused coping moderated the relation between workload and physical health. Three-way interactions indicated that problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies in combination seemed to have the potential to alleviate the negative effects of high workload for organizational commitment and well-being. These results indicate that in order to cope with high workload, both problem-focused and emotion-focused strategies are useful, either separate or in combination.

  • 23.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Att arbeta i samma sektor, organisation och yrke: Likheter och skillnader i arbetsklimat och hälsobesvär bland kvinnor och män som arbetar som läkare2016In: Inkluderande och hållbart arbetsliv: Book of Abstracts - FALF 2016, Mittuniversitetet , 2016, 23-23 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Arbetsmarknaden i Sverige är könssegregerad. Det innebär att kvinnor och män i hög grad arbetar i olika sektorer och har olika yrken. Det gör att sektor och yrke behöver tas med när hälsoskillnader mellan kvinnor och män ska undersökas. Den här studien undersöker likheter och skillnader i arbetsklimat och hälsobesvär bland kvinnor och män som arbetar i samma sektor, i samma organisation och har samma yrke. Först jämförs arbetsklimat och hälsobesvär mellan kvinnor och män. Sedan undersöks sambanden mellan arbetsklimatet och hälsobesvär för kvinnor och män. Resultaten baseras på självrapporter i enkäter från 95 kvinnor och 105 män som arbetade som läkare på ett och samma akutsjukhus i Stockholm. Resultaten visade inga statistiskt säkerställda skillnader mellan kvinnor och män när det gällde upplevelser av arbetet, arbetsrollen, ledarskapet eller organisationen. Dock rapporterade kvinnorna att de upplevde sammanhållningen och samarbetet i arbetsgruppen som lägre än männen. Kvinnorna rapporterade också mer av både psykiska och fysiska hälsobesvär jämfört med männen. Både sammanhållning och samarbete i arbetsgruppen var relaterade till färre hälsobesvär, men bara för männen. Den här explorativa studien visar att det kan finnas likheter i arbetsklimatet bland kvinnor och män när arbetssituationen är likartad, men tyder också på att en del av de skillnader som finns i den segregerade arbetsmarknaden också tycks vara närvarande för kvinnor och män som arbetar i samma sektor, organisation och yrke.

  • 24.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Working in the Same Sector, in the Same Organization and in the Same Occupation: Similarities and Differences Between Women and Men Physicians’ Work Climate and Health Complaints2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, ISSN 2245-0157, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 4, 67-84 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the segregated labor market, gender differences in health are often confounded by factors such as sector or occupation.This study explored similarities and differences in work climate and health complaints among women and men working in the same sector, in the same organization, and in the same occupation. First, work climate and health complaints were compared between women and men. Second, relations between the work climate and health complaints were investigated in both genders. Questionnaire data were collected from 95 women and 105 men physicians who worked in the same acute care hospital in Sweden.The results showed no gender differences in the job, role, leadership, or organizational characteristics. However, women physicians reported less workgroup cohesiveness and cooperation and more mental and physical health complaints than men physicians.Workgroup cohesiveness and cooperation were related to less health complaints only for men physicians.This explorative study indicates similarities between women and men when the work situation is similar, but suggests that some of the differences that appear in the large structures of the gender-segregated labor market also seem to be present for women and men who work in the same sector, in the same organization, and in the same occupation.

  • 25.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Working in the Same Sector, in the Same Organization and in the Same Occupation: Women and Men Physicians’ Work Climate and Health Complaints2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explores similarities and differences between women and men with similar working conditions (working within the same sector, in the same organization, and in the same occupation). Women and men were compared regarding 1) levels of psychological work climate and health complaints and 2) how the work climate related to health complaints.

    Design/Methodology: Questionnaire data were collected from 95 women and 105 men physicians who worked in the same acute care hospital in Sweden in 2001.

    Results: Results showed no gender differences in the job, role, leadership, or organizational characteristics. Women reported less workgroup cohesiveness and cooperation and more mental and physical health complaints than men. Role characteristics (overload/conflict/ambiguity) were related to more health complaints for both women and men. Workgroup cohesiveness and cooperation were related to less health complaints only for men.

    Limitations: The study did not account for women and men often working as physicians in different specialties and/or may perform different work tasks. The non-work domain was not investigated.

    Research/practical implications: This study indicates similarities between women and men when the work situation is similar, but suggests that some of the differences that appear in the larger structures of the gender-segregated labor market also seem to be present for women and men who work in the same sector, the same organization, and in the same occupation.

    Originality: Previous research has underscored the problem of finding samples that are large enough to allow comparing women and men working under similar working conditions.

  • 26.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Working in the same sector, organization and occupation: Similarities and differences in work climate and health complaints among women and men physicans2016In: Posters from the 2016 workshop, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish labor market is gender segregated. This means that gender differences in health can be confounded by factors associated with sector and occupation. Thus, sector and occupation need to be considered when comparing work environment and health between women and men. This study uses the theoretical model of psychological work climate that specifies the work environment in terms of five dimensions. These five dimensions are characteristics of the job, role, workgroup, leadership and organization. The aim of the present study was to explore similarities and differences between women and men who have similar working conditions (working in the same sector, in the same organization, and in the same occupation). Women and men were compared regarding 1) levels of work climate and health complaints and 2) how the work climate related to health complaints.

  • 27.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Working in the same sector, organization and occupation: Similarities and differences in work climate and health complaints among women and men physicians2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish labor market is gender segregated. This means that gender differences in health can be confounded by factors associated with sector and occupation. Thus, sector and occupation need to be considered when comparing work environment and health between women and men.  This study uses the theoretical model of psychological work climate that specifies the work environment in terms of five dimensions. These five dimensions are characteristics of the job, role, workgroup, leadership and organization. The aim of the present study was to explore similarities and differences between women and men who have similar working conditions (working in the same sector, in the same organization, and in the same occupation). Women and men were compared regarding 1) levels of work climate and health complaints and 2) how the work climate related to health complaints.

  • 28.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Finns det skillnader mellan kvinnliga och manliga läkares arbetsmiljö efter bolagisering?2008In: The First National Conference of Working Life: 6-7 May 2008, at Växjö University, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    To transform public administration units into non-profit public stock companies has been one way to meet effectiveness and quality demands in Swedish health care. This kind of change, like other changes, is assumed to increase the feelings of uncertainty among the employees. Uncertainty is associated with a negative work climate, more negative work related attitudes and ill-health. Men have often a higher status than women, which could give men better resources to handle uncertainty, compared to women. The aim of this study is to investigate if there are any differences in work climate, work related attitudes and ill-health between female and male physicians after a change of an acute care hospital from being a public administration unit to be a non-profit public stock company. The first step is, however, to investigate if women and men mean the same thing by the concepts of work climate, work related attitudes and ill-health. This cross-sectional study investigates 191 physicians (92 women and 99 men) who worked at a hospital which had been transformed into a non-profit public stock company. Even tough there were some differences between the genders in the appraisal of the investigated concepts, the underlying structure seem to be similar for women and men. The results of two multivariate analyses of variance showed that female physicians reported worse work climate, less commitment and more ill-health than their male counterparts. This suggests that women (compared to men) could have less access to resources to reduce uncertainty in the case of an organizational change. This should be taken into account when changes are planned and implemented.

  • 29.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Personalens arbetsattityder och hälsa vid privatisering: en jämförelse mellan två svenska akutsjukhus2008In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 14, no 1, 29-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Increased effectiveness and quality are often given as reasons for privatization, but the outcome of the change is likely dependent of how the employees react. In spite of this, it is still unclear what consequences a privatization process has for the employees. This study investigates how the privatization of an acute care hospital affects the employees’ work attitudes and self reported ill-health. Data is analyzed both at hospital level and at three different hierarchic levels (physicians, registered nurses, and assistant nurses).

  • 30.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sjöberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    How are employees at different levels affected by privatization?2013In: Forum för arbetslivsforskning (FALF) - Changes in Working Life: Individual, Organizational, and Methodological Perspectives, Stockholm, Sweden, June 17-19, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Privatizations have been carried out all across the world in recent decades, but there is still a lack of research about the psychological and health-related consequences of this kind of change on employees. As with other types of organizational change, privatization can be considered a stressful event that may result in impaired work attitudes and strain. However, such effects are likely to vary depending on the individual’s position in the organization. The aim of this study is to investigate how privatization may affect work-related attitudes and strain of employees, and to analyze whether the effects of privatization differ between employees at various hierarchic levels. Results based on questionnaire data collected at two Swedish hospitals both before and after one of the hospitals underwent privatization suggests only limited effects of privatization on a general level, but that employees at various hierarchic levels may be affected differently. While employees at a high level (physicians) and low level (assistant nurses) reported only marginal differences over time in work attitudes and strain, as compared with their colleagues at the comparison hospital, the work attitudes of employees at the intermediate level (registered nurses) declined after privatization. The knowledge that some occupational groups could be affected more negatively than others and that special attention should be paid to intermediate occupational groups can be useful information for different actors in a privatization process, such as the politicians who make decisions regarding privatizations and the management executives who may carry them out.

  • 31.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sjöberg, Anders
    How are employees at different levels affected by privatization?: A longitudinal study of two Swedish hospitals2009In: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 0963-1798, Vol. 82, no 1, 45-65 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the amount of privatizations around the world in recent decades, only limited research attention has been paid to how privatization affects the employees. The effects are likely to vary depending on the individual’s position in the organization. The aim of this study was to investigate how employees’ work-related attitudes and strain changed after privatization of a Swedish acute care hospital, and to analyze whether the effects of privatization differed between employees at various hierarchic levels. Questionnaire data collected at a hospital 1 year before and 2 years after privatization, as well as at a hospital which remained a public administration unit, suggest only limited effects of privatization on a general level, but that employees at various hierarchic levels may be affected differently. While employees at a high level (physicians) and low level (assistant nurses) reported only marginal differences over time in work attitudes and strain, also in comparison with their colleagues at the comparison hospital, work attitudes of employees at the intermediate level (registered nurses) decreased after privatization. These results emphasize the importance of taking hierarchic level into account when a privatization is implemented and analyzed.

  • 32. Goslinga, Sjoerd
    et al.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Chirumbolo, Antonio
    De Witte, Hans
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Role of Union Support in Coping With Job Insecurity: A Study Among Union Members from Three European Countries2005In: SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, ISSN 0258-5200, Vol. 31, no 4, 72-78 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines the potential moderating role of union support in the relationship between job insecurity and work-related attitudes and well-being of unionised employees. Survey data collected among union members from three European countries (The Netherlands, Italy and Sweden) indicate that job insecurity is associated with reduced levels of job satisfaction, well-being and organisational commitment. Contrary to expectations, union support moderated neither the effect of job insecurity on job satisfaction nor its effect on wellbeing. However, in two countries a moderating effect of union support on relation between the job insecurity and organisational commitment was found.

  • 33.
    Göransson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Psykologiska perspektiv på hot och våld i arbetslivet: Kunskapsöversikt2011Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med rapporten är att sammanställa psykologisk forskning om hot och våld i arbetslivet. En sammanställning underlättar för forskare och praktiker att se vad som gjorts och vad tidigare resultat tyder på, men även var det finns kunskapsluckor.

  • 34.
    Göransson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Work-related health attributions: their impact on work attitudes2009In: International Journal of Workplace, ISSN 1753-8351, Vol. 2, no 1, 6-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to introduce the concept of work-related health attributions and investigate the effects of such perceptions as well as of health status on work-related attitudes and turnover intentions.

    Building on attribution theory, the study tests the assumption that negative work-related health attributions impair employee work-related attitudes and intentions, and moderate the relation between health status and work-related attitudes. Cross-sectional questionnaire data from 785 Swedish retail white-collar workers are collected to test these assumptions by utilizing moderated regression analyses.

    The results show that negative work-related health attributions are related to lower levels of job satisfaction and organizational commitment as well as higher levels of turnover intention, even after controlling for demographics, work climate variables, and mental distress. Further, the significant interaction between attributions and mental distress indicates that it makes a difference for employees’ turnover intentions if an individual with high mental distress attributes it to work or not.

    Work-related health attributions should be taken into account in order to avoid impaired levels of employee work motivation. The measure introduced renders it possible to identify and help those individuals who believe that work affects their health negatively. The results underscore the relevance of how individuals think their health is affected by their work, and contributes to the understanding of how health status relates to work-related attitudes. Since the measure of work-related health attributions is easily administered it is also valuable for practitioners working with employee health and attitudes.

  • 35.
    Hansen, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
    Predicting burnout from demands and resources: A comparison between private and public hospitals2007In: XIIIth European Congress of Work and Organizational Psychology, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Burnout among health-care employees is an issue that has received considerable research attention, and numerous studies have found burnout to be predicted by various work-related demands and resources. However, despite the fact that health-care systems in many countries include public as well as private hospitals, our knowledge is limited when it concerns differences in the burnout process between health-care staff in hospitals with different ownership. Data from nurses at three Swedish acute care hospitals – a privatized for-profit, a publicly owned non-profit stock company, and a traditional public administration unit – were used to test (a) if burnout levels differed between hospitals with different ownership and (b) if demands and resources were differently related to nurses’ burnout in the three hospitals. Preliminary results indicate that the burnout level in the public hospital was lower compared to the private and the public companies. Certain demands, such as workload and role conflict, were consistently associated with burnout across hospitals. There were also important differences between private and public hospitals. While the results have immediate implications for hospital managements and efforts to improve employee work environment, they may also provide important insights for political decisions concerning the advantages and disadvantages of public and private ownership of acute care hospitals.

  • 36.
    Hansen, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
    Predicting nurse burnout from demands and resources in three acute care hospitals under different forms of ownership: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey.2009In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, Vol. 46, no 1, 95-106 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health care organizations have changed dramatically over the last decades, with hospitals undergoing restructurings and privatizations.

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to enhance the understanding of the origin and prevalence of burnout in health care by investigating factors in the psychosocial work environment and comparing three Swedish emergency hospitals with different types of ownership.

    Design: A cross-sectional design was used.

    Participants: We selected a total sample of 1800 registered nurses from three acute care hospitals, one private for-profit, one private non-profit and one publicly administered. A total of 1102 questionnaires were included in the analyses.

    Settings: The examined ownership types were a private for-profit, a private non-profit and a traditional publicly administered hospital. All were situated in the Stockholm region, Sweden.

    Methods: Data were collected by questionnaires using validated instruments, in accordance with the Job Demands–Resources Model and Maslach’s Burnout Inventory. Descriptive statistics, correlation analyses, multivariate covariance analyses and multiple regression analyses were conducted.

    Results: The results showed that the burnout levels were the highest at the private for-profit hospital and lowest at the publicly administered hospital. However, in contrast to expectations the demands were not higher overall at the for-profit organization or lowest at the public administration unit, and overall, resources were not better in the private for-profit or worse at the publicly administered hospital. Multiple regression analyses showed that several of the demands included were related to higher burnout levels. Job resources were linked to lower burnout levels, but not for all variables.

    Conclusions: Profit orientation in health care seems to result in higher burnout levels for registered nurses compared to a publicly administered hospital. In general, demands were more predictive of burnout than resources, and there were only marginal differences in the pattern of predictors across hospitals.

  • 37.
    Hansen, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
    Utbrändhet i vården: Betydelsen av krav och resurser på tre sjukhus med olika driftsformer2008In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 14, no 3, 11-30 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hälso- och sjukvården har de senaste decennierna förändrats dramatiskt med bland annat bolagiseringar och privatiseringar. Samtidigt visar statistik på stora ohälsotal inom vårdsektorn. Studien syftar därför till att bidra till förståelsen av uppkomsten och utbredningen av utbrändhet i sjukvården. Detta görs dels genom att beakta faktorer i den psykosociala arbetsmiljön, dels genom att jämföra tre akutsjukhus i Stockholmsregionen som har olika typer av driftsform: traditionell förvaltningsdriven, bolagiserad och privat vinstdriven.

  • 38.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    There’s more to the picture than meets the eye: A comparison of downsizing survivors with changed and unchanged job content.2005In: SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, ISSN 0258-5200, Vol. 31, no 4, 87-93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational downsizing, in the form of permanent layoffs and offers of early retirement, has become a frequently used strategy. Previous research has identified work attitudes and well-being of survivors as critical for obtaining the anticipated beneficial outcomes, but knowledge is limited regarding the effects of downsizing on different types of survivors. Drawing upon theories on organizational attachment and well-being, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of downsizing on employee attitudes and well-being by comparing survivors who had their work situation changed as a function of the downsizing process with survivors whose situation remained unaffected. Longitudinal questionnaire data were obtained during the course of downsizing. The results show that survivors with a changed work situation reported higher levels of role stress, less favorable job attitudes and more health complaints as compared to survivors who did not have their work situation changed. These findings are important in order to better understand and counteract negative reactions following organizational downsizing.

  • 39.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Pienaar, Jaco
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    A validation of a two-dimensional job insecurity scale in South Africa and Sweden2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of job insecurity has received growing recognition in connection with increased unemployment and the use of large workforce reductions to improve organizational effectiveness and competitive ability. Given this, job insecurity has emerged as an important stressor in modern working life, and perceptions of job insecurity have consequently been found to correlate negatively with job and organizational attitudes as well as mental and physical health complaints. Research has traditionally focused on threats of imminent job loss, but several researchers and commentators have argued for a broadening of the concept to also include threats of deteriorated employment conditions.

    Even if measures of the construct are available, measurement properties in terms of reliability, factor structure, and predictive validity are far from clear. The purpose of this study is to address this issue by validating a two dimensional job insecurity scale using confirmatory factor analysis. The first dimension, “quantitative job insecurity” focuses on an overall concern about losing the job as such, whereas the second dimension “qualitative job insecurity” relates to the loss of important job features such as, lack of career opportunities, decreasing salary development, and impaired working conditions. The two dimensions may also relate different to outcomes in terms of relationships as well as magnitude of the relationship. Data for the study are currently being collected in South Africa and Sweden. The results of multi-group confirmatory factor analysis will reveal if the estimated two-dimensional measurement models holds true in both South Africa and Sweden. The results will also show if the job insecurity measure correlates satisfactorily with theoretically derived correlates. The results will stress the importance of developing valid measurement scales in order to satisfactorily estimate the relationships between job insecurity and its postulated outcomes.

  • 40.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Changing work roles: new demands and challenges2007In: The Individual in the Changing Working Life, Cambridge University Press , 2007, 46-66 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    New deamnds and challenges in salaried employees’ work situation.2006In: The 7th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology: Dublin, Ireland, November 8-10, 2006., 2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the importance of these new potential stressors above and beyond more traditional role characteristics, for employee well-being and motivation. More specifically, the purpose of this study is to investigate the relative importance of demographics, role characteristics, and work stressors related to the new working life for salaried employees’ experiences of health and motivation.

    The empirical data for this study was collected by means of a questionnaire administered salaried employees working in administrative and teaching jobs in the service-sector in Sweden. Out of a total of 1178 questionnaires 836 were returned to the research team (71%). The respondents’ mean age was 50 years (SD = 10) with an average tenure of 17 years (SD = 13), and 74 percent of the sample was female.

    Preliminary results indicate that stressors related to vaguely defined tasks and unclear work goals are important contributions to the salaried employees’ perceived health and well-being above and beyond more traditional role stressors like role overload, role ambiguity and role conflict. Similar results were also obtained for work attitudes and motivation. These results are in line with the notion that greater demands on employees to be independent and effective, along with increased autonomy, may result in a generally more demanding work situation if the work tasks and their goals are vaguely defined and blurred in terms of the output or results.

  • 42.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Turnover as a response to job insecurity: The moderating effect of employability.2006In: The Sixth Conference on Psychology and Health: Kerkrade, the Netherlands, 8-10 May, 2006., 2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has identified a link between job insecurity perceptions and turnover intentions among employees. It has also been suggested that in times of turmoil and insecurity in the organization, employees who perceive themselves as employable are more prone to voluntarily leave the organization as compared to employees perceiving themselves as less employable and attractive on the labor market. Along this line it has also been proposed that the individuals most attractive on the labor market are often key-persons that the organization want to keep, and consequently, the organization may suffer if employable employees leave the organization. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of job insecurity perceptions on two different types of turnover intentions, namely organizational turnover and occupational turnover. Secondly, this study aims at investigating the potential moderating role of employability on the relationship between job insecurity and the two types of turnover intention, suggesting that employees perceiving themselves as more employable will be more prone to leave the organization when experiencing job insecurity. The study is based on questionnaire data collected in an acute care hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. The results indicate that employability perceptions may play an important role in employees’ turnover intentions during organization turmoil and in connection with feelings of job insecurity.

  • 43.
    Kalyal, Hina Jawaid
    et al.
    NUST Business School, National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Baraldi, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The moderating role of employability on the relationship between job insecurity and commitment to change2010In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 31, no 3, 327-344 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of commitment to change is an underresearched area especially in non-western settings. The aim of the present study was to determine whether employability can moderate the negative effects of job insecurity on individuals’ commitment to change. A survey method approach was used to collect 149 responses from managers of a large public sector organization in Pakistan undergoing restructuring. Hierarchical multiple regression results suggest that employability is an important coping resource during organizational change as it helps mitigate the negative effects of job insecurity on the most desirable form of commitment to change, namely affective commitment to change. Theoretical and practical implications of the study are discussed.

  • 44.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    Measuring quantitative and qualitative aspects of the job insecurity climate: Scale validation2015In: Career Development International, ISSN 1362-0436, E-ISSN 1758-6003, Vol. 20, no 3, 202-217 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a measure of job insecurity climate by: first, testing whether job insecurity climate and individual job insecurity are two separate constructs; and second, investigating the relative importance of individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate in predicting work-related and health-related outcomes.

    Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected by questionnaires in a simple stratified random sample of 1,380 white-collar workers in Sweden. The response rate was 56 percent.

    Findings – Confirmatory factor analyses showed that job insecurity climate was distinct from individual job insecurity. Four separate ridge regression analyses showed that qualitative job insecurity climate was a significant predictor of demands, work-family conflict, psychological distress, and poor self-rated health and that quantitative job insecurity climate predicted demands and work-family conflict.

    Research limitations/implications – The study is based on self-reports, which may involve common method bias. The cross-sectional study design limits the possibility to make causal inferences regarding the relationship between job insecurity climate and outcomes.

    Practical implications – Future studies may consider measuring job insecurity climate in line with a referent-shift model. Work environment surveys in organizations that include measures of individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate can provide practitioners with a fuller picture of the psychosocialwork environment.

    Originality/value – The present study adds to previous research by introducing a new approach to measuring and conceptualizing job insecurity climate.

  • 45.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm Stress Center, Sweden.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm Stress Center, Sweden.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm Stress Center, Sweden.
    Job insecurity climate perceptions: Scale validation and a qualitative exploration2012In: Book of Proceedings: 10th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology / [ed] Jain, A., Hollis, D., Andreou, N., Wehrle, F., Nottingham: European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology , 2012, 32-33 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Job insecurity is a modern work stressor negatively affecting work attitudes, wellbeing and the health of employees worldwide. It has mainly been investigated as an individual level phenomenon, but drawing on the theoretical framework of social cognitive theory, it could be argued that job insecurity is also a social phenomenon. Behavioral, cognitive or other person-related factors as well as contextual factors interact in a reciprocal relationship, and shape individuals’ perceptions and interpretations of organizational events. Shared perceptions of job insecurity could be referred to as a job insecurity climate (Sora, Caballer, Peiró, & De Witte, 2009). However, it is not yet clear how job insecurity climate should be conceptualized. The multiple operationalizations of climate constructs found in organizational research, along with methodological concerns, motivates a study on the concept of job insecurity climate.

    Aims:

    (1)   A qualitative exploration the job insecurity climate construct

    (2)   A validation study of a newly developed measure of job insecurity climate

    Methods: Interviews were conducted with job insecure informants and informants working in organizations undergoing organizational change and who could be expected to experience some degree of job insecurity. Their participation was secured through snowball sampling, and a thematic analysis was conducted on the transcribed interviews. Further, questionnaire items for measuring job insecurity climate were developed, and data is currently being collected. The data collection will be finalized late November 2011.

    Results/relevance: Preliminary results of the interview study gave an indication of how the job insecurity climate construct can be conceptualized. The thematic analysis revealed that the whole organization needs not be the social unit of a climate. The job insecure climate could rather be ascribed to specific groups, like for instance a group of professionals (e.g. computer technicians), a demographic group (e.g. female doctoral students), or a geographically defined unit (e.g. a branch office of a company). Depending on the focus of the study, job insecurity climate could be conceptualized either as a psychological climate or as an organizational climate. The validation of the questionnaire items will contribute further to our understanding of the job insecurity climate construct.

  • 46.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The job insecurity climate scale: Creating and testing a measure for job insecurity climates2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Job insecurity, conceptualized as “the perception of a potential threat to the continuity of the current job” is a work stressor that is associated with negative consequences for well-being, health and work attitudes. So far, the individual has been the main unit of interest for research on job insecurity. However, job insecurity can also be seen as a social phenomenon, where the fous is on shared perceptions of job insecurity – a job insecurity climate. The social cognitive theory explains how behavioral, cognitive or other person-related and contextual factors interact in a reciprocal relationship. Related to job insecurity, then, this can help us understand how job insecurity climate can emerge.

    Previously, a few studies have been published on job insecurity climate. But the measuring of job insecurity climate is still a relatively new area of interest to researchers. The multiple operationalizations of organizational climate found in organizational research along with methodological concerns, motivates a study on the concept of job insecurity climate and ways of measuring it.

    Aim: The purpose of this study is to develop and test an instrument for measuring job insecurity climate.

    Methods: As a first step, questionnaire items were developed to reflect job insecurity at a group level. Further, the study compared results from the newly developed job insecurity climate scale with aggregated individual-level data on job insecurity. The aim is to evaluate which type of scale of measurement is more appropriate for capturing job insecurity climate. The data will be collected in early 2011.

    Results/relevance: The purpose of this study is to contribute to our understanding of job insecurity in general, as well as job insecurity climates in particular, and its consequences for employees.

  • 47.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury, New Zeeland.
    Richter, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sverige.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    30 års forskning om anställningsotrygghet: En litteraturöversikt2016In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 22, no 3/4, 8-27 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Anställningsotrygghet – en oro för att mot sin vilja förlora jobbet – är något som de flesta anställda idag upplever under sina yrkesliv. Den beteendevetenskapliga forskningen inom detta område har skjutit fart sedan millennieskiftet, vilket motiverar behovet av en uppdaterad litteraturöversikt. Översikten omfattar prediktorer och konsekvenser av anställningsotrygghet samt vilka faktorer som har identifierats som viktiga när det gäller att mildra anställningsotrygghetens konsekvenser.

  • 48.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Richter, Anne
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Do the Consequences of Job Insecurity Differ between Cultural and Welfare Contexts?: Meta-Analytic Findings2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: A rapidly growing body of literature has shown that perceptions of job insecurity are related to negative outcomes, but less is known about the relative importance of different societal contexts. It has for instance been argued that the consequences of job insecurity may be more negative in countries that have a high level of social protection, because of the social stigma of unemployment. On the other hand, the lack of unemployment insurance programs may aggravate the negative consequences. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate if work- and health-related consequences of job insecurity vary between cultural and welfare contexts.

    Design/Methodology: A literature search with the search terms “job insecurity”, “job uncertainty”, “job security”, and “job security satisfaction” in Psycinfo, Web of Science, and EBSCO produced a sample of 523 peer-reviewed papers published between 1980 and July 2016. Economic and social development, national welfare system, and tolerance for ambiguity were tested as moderators in the relationship between job insecurity and outcomes.

    Results: The results indicate that the magnitudes of effects of job insecurity differ depending on the choice of classification system.

    Limitations: The literature search was limited to published, peer-reviewed papers. This demarcation may have introduced a publication bias to the study.

    Research/Practical implications: In addition to being an important individual and organizational concern, job insecurity is also intimately linked with societal level factors.

    Originality/Value: This study contributes to an increased understanding of the importance of macro-level factors in the association between job insecurity and outcomes.

  • 49.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand .
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Roles of Shared Perceptions of Job Insecurity and Job Insecurity Climate for Work- and Health-Related Outcomes: A Multilevel ApproachManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine job insecurity from a multilevel perspective and to investigate the roles of two types of job insecurity – job insecurity climate and individual job insecurity – for work-related attitudes and health outcomes. We further explore the role of the workgroup – as a social context – in shaping job insecurity perceptions. Data was collected from white-collar employees in a Swedish organization, with 126 participants nested in 18 groups. The results show that 19% of the variance in job insecurity climate perceptions, and none of the variance in individual job insecurity perceptions, could be attributed to group membership. Further, compared to other members of their group, those perceiving a stronger job insecurity climate reported lower levels of negative self-rated health and higher burnout scores. These results imply that the workgroup is an important social context for job insecurity climate perceptions and, thus, that leaders should take job insecurity climate perceptions at the workgroup level into account.

  • 50.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Investigating Job Insecurity Climate from a Multilevel Perspective: Its Impact on Psychological Distress, and Ill-Health Symptoms2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Job insecurity is a work stressor that has detrimental effects on work related attitudes, well-being and health. Job insecurity has mainly been investigated as an individual level phenomenon. Consequentially, the focus of past research is only on personal determinants and consequences of the employee’s perception, and social/organizational factors have not been taken into account to any large extent. However, drawing on sense making theory, it can be argued that job insecurity is a social phenomenon as well. Conceptualized as job insecurity climate, job insecurity could be considered a product of the reciprocal relationship between behavior, cognitive and other personal factors, and the social environment.

    The aim of this study is to examine job insecurity from a multilevel perspective and explore to what extent the variance in job insecurity perceptions is dependent on the individual, and how important the work group as a social context in shaping job insecurity perceptions. We also aim to investigate the effects of job insecurity, both climate and individual job insecurity, on job satisfaction, productivity, burnout, and subjective health. By including both individual level job insecurity and job insecurity climate perceptions in the analysis, a deeper understanding is gained of the relation between job insecurity and negative outcomes, and thus contributes to extending our knowledge about job insecurity as a work life stressor.

    Results from a pilot study of a Swedish sample using multilevel modeling showed that the work group accounts for about 5% of the variance in job insecurity climate perceptions and 2.6% of individual job insecurity perceptions. This indicates that the social context has some impact on perceptions of job insecurity. However, since the respondents in this sample perceived a very low sense of job insecurity, these results had to be replicated with another sample. Data from a second sample (N=126) were recently collected, and preliminary results show that belonging to a group accounted for 20% of the variance in job insecurity climate perceptions and 0% of the variance in perceptions of  job insecurity. These results could have implications for future studies on climate, indicating that perceptions of one’s own job insecurity do not necessarily match one’s perceptions of the job insecurity climate.

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