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  • 1. Ericson, Staffan
    et al.
    Riegert, KristinaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Media Houses: architecture, media and the production of centrality2010Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2. Hammarlund, Johan
    et al.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    "Understanding the Prime Mover: Ambivalent Swedish Press Discourse on the USA from 1984 to 2009”2011In: International Journal of Cultural Studies, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 5-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a pervasive historical construct that is both foreign and familiar, the USA has a looming presence in Swedish media discourse. Swedish journalists’ views of the USA can best be described as ambivalent — critical of a unilateral or too passive US foreign policy, while at the same time being heavily influenced by many aspects of the American economic model and culture. This article presents the results of an analysis of Swedish editorials, debate, commentary and cultural articles about the USA in time periods between 1984 and 2009. During these three decades USA actions are broadly framed against the backdrop of Cold War, globalization and cultural contestation paradigms respectively. The USA is seen as a formidable power, one that should be checked by others on the international stage. Cultural symbols based on historical European narratives about the US are called upon to illustrate reckless unilateralism (‘Space Cowboy’ Reagan) or the future-oriented entrepreneur as a role model for Sweden (during the Clinton years). The final decade under the cultural contestation paradigm is also ambivalent — the role of religion in the USA appears foreign to Swedish eyes, whereas the USA’s cultural misunderstandings with others appear familiar.

  • 3. Hellman, Heikke
    et al.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Kristensen, Nette Nørgaard
    Millennium 4: medierna och kvalitetsförhandling av en bästsäljare2018In: Kvalitetsforhandlinger  : Kvalitetsbegrepet i samtidens kunst og kultur / [ed] Jan Fredrik Hovden, Øyvind Prytz, Oslo: Fagbokforlaget, 2018, p. 403-436Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Hellman, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Emerging Transnational News Spheres in Global Crisis Reporting2012In: Handbook of Global Media Research / [ed] Ingrid Volkmer, Chicester: John Wiley & Sons, 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Hellman, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Tsunamikatastrofen i nationell och transnationell tv - en studie om medierollen i globala kriser2009Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6. Kristensen, Nete Nørgaard
    et al.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Why Cultural Journalism in the Nordic Countries?2017In: Cultural Journalism in the Nordic Countries / [ed] Nete Nørgaard Kristensen, Kristina Riegert, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7. Kristensen, Nete Nørgaard
    et al.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Hellman, Heikke
    Nordiske kulturjournalister forført af Mad Men2018In: Kvalitetsforhandlinger: Kvalitetsbegrepet i samtidens kunst og kultur / [ed] Jan Fredrik Hovden, Øyvind Prytz, Oslo: Fagbokforlaget, 2018, p. 437-464Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8. Nohrstedt, Stig Arne
    et al.
    Kaitatzi-Whitlock, Sophia
    Ottosen, Rune
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    From the Persian Gulf to Kosovo:: War Journalism and Propaganda2000In: European Journal of Communication, ISSN 0267-3231, E-ISSN 1460-3705, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 383-404Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete
    et al.
    Hellman, Heikke
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Cultural Mediators Seduced by Mad Men: How Cultural Journalists Legitimized a Quality TV Series in the Nordic Region2019In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 257-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on theories about the role of cultural mediators in cultural production and using the TV series Mad Men as a case, this article investigates how cultural journalists in the Nordic countries have contributed to legitimizing “quality TV series” as a worthy field of aesthetic consumption. Key analytical points are as follows: (1) cultural journalists legitimize Mad Men’s quality by addressing aspects internal (aesthetic markers) and aspects external (culture industry markers) to the series, as well as the series’ broader social and historical anchoring; (2) Nordic cultural journalists position themselves positively toward the TV series based on their professional expertise and their personal taste preferences and predilections; (3) these legitimation processes take place across journalistic genres, pointing to the importance not only of TV criticism, epitomized by the review, but of cultural journalism more broadly in constructing affirmative attitudes toward popular culture phenomena such as TV series.

  • 10. Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete
    et al.
    Riegert, KristinaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Cultural Journalism in the Nordic Countries2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an era when culture itself has become central to political debates, when boundaries between hard news and soft news, facts and opinion are dissolving, cultural journalism contributes to democratic discourse on vital issues of our time. Cultural journalism is furthermore indicative of journalistic autonomy and specialisation within media organisations, and of the intertwined relationship between the cultural and political public spheres. Nordic cultural journalism in the mainstream media covers more subjects today than ever before, from fine arts to gaming, media industries, and lifestyle issues. At the same time, it harbours debates and reflection on freedom of expression, ethnicity and national identity. This book contributes to an emerging international research agenda on cultural journalism at a time when digitalisation, convergence and globalisation are influencing the character of journalism in multiple ways.

  • 11.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Before the Revolutionary Moment: The Significance of Lebanese and Egyptian Bloggers for Mediated Public Spheres2012In: Information Orders and New Communications Technology: Democratic Hopes and Authoritarian Pitfalls / [ed] Johan Lagerkvist, Stockholm: Utrikespolitiska Institutet , 2012, p. 20-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For many countries across the Arab world, 2005 marks the rise of the social media for airing controversial ideas, critiquing the powerful, and sharing popular culture. Intellectuals, politicians, students and activists have since then become adept at using Internet-enabled media to expose minority discrimination, the public sexual harassment of women, as well as the systematic torture, abuse and corruption by the authorities. It may also be said that in a number of cases the negative publicity has forced Arab governments to take action. However, aside from increasing the speed of communication and promoting the engagement of the ‘activist’ classes, the impact of the social media on the mediated public sphere is not exactly clear.

  • 12.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Before the Revolutionary Moment: The Significance of Lebanese and Egyptian Bloggers in the New Media Ecology2014In: Citizen Journalism: Volume 2. Global Perspectives / [ed] Stuart Allan and Einar Thorsen, New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2014, 1, p. 67-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Good Europeans?: Euro-themes in Swedish, Danish and British TV News during  a November Week2008In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 29-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Television news narratives are sites where national and transnational identities are cultivatedand mobilised. The question is not whether Swedish, Danish or British news stories about Europe are domesticated to fit national news bulletins, but how events are domesticated and how ‘we’ are made European by the programmes’ producers. The analysis of all European stories between 15-21 November 1999 in three national public servicenews bulletins indicate that viewers are offered different images of Europe during this week, and that journalists play active roles in constructing ‘themes’ which link together different types of news stories into narratives about ‘us’ and ‘them’. From these there emerged a Swedish ‘moralising global villager’, slightly superior but willing to adapt to changing international realities, an anxious and conscientious Danish ‘we’, trying to doits share despite its self-imposed limitations on EU cooperation, and an engaged humanitarian British ‘we’, who is global in scope but prefers to keep a distance from time consuming Euro-squabbles.

  • 14.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Introduction2004In: News of the other: tracing identity in Scandinavian constructions of the eastern Baltic Sea region / [ed] Kristina Riegert, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2004, p. 9-17Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Introduction2007In: Politicotainment: television's take on the real / [ed] Kristina Riegert, New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2007, p. 1-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    ”Know Your Enemy, Know Your Allies   : Lessons Not Learned from the Kosovo Conflict2002In: The Journal of Information Warfare, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 79-93Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    National Television News of the World: Challenges and Consequences2010In: Communicating the Nation: National Topographies of Global Media Landscapes / [ed] Anna Rooswall and Inka Salovaara-Moring, Göteborg: Nordicom , 2010Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The nation is one of the most resilient concepts in our understanding of the world and its societies. Politics, sports and cultural events, in news as well as in fiction, are largely structured by the national logic. Internationalism – be it in representation, production or consumption – does not challenge the privileged position of the nation. Globalising processes do offer an alternative to the primacy of the nation, but have so far been unable to overcome its dominance. The nation’s resilience is, in part, due to its continuing relevance: ontologically, it offers a sense of territorial stability and security while epistemologically it can supply a sense of familiarity and order in the global landscape. This volume provides cutting edge analysis of old and new architectures of the nation and its mediated presence in everyday life. In an age of alleged globalisation, nations and nation-states have been claimed to be out-dated. However, the proclamation of the end of the nation (-state) has been premature. Eschewing fashionable obituaries for media, geography and the nation, leading media scholars explore the complex ideological and spatial changes in contemporary understandings of the nation. The nation can be seen as a nodal point of media discourse. Hence the power, the politics and the poetics of the nation will be the subject of this book.

  • 18.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    "Nationalising" Foreign Conflict: Foreign Policy Orientation as a Factor in Television News Reporting1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the notion that national television news covers foreign conflicts in ways that reflect a country's foreign policy orientation and its stance towards that particular conflict. Sweden and Britain were chosen for comparison since both are European countries with similar public service broadcasting systems, but with different foreign policy orientations and positions in the international system. Four cases were chosen to determine empirically how and to what extent aspects of these foreign policy orientations were relevant for foreign conflict news images.

    The theorefical frarnework sketched three types of factors which could contribute to the image of foreign conflicts in national television news: the foreign policy orientation (societal/political factors), an international media culture (media factors) and a national journalist culture (media norms in a societal context). Both quantitative and qualitative content analyses were used to test if Swedish Rapport and British 9 O´Clock News differed along four dimensions: whether they set conflicts in a superpower or regional context, whether they focused on the military or civilian aspects of the conflict, whether they gave more attention to Great Power actors or international/regional organisations, and whether they evaluated the contenders differently.

    The results indicate that Rapport and the 9 O´Clock News differed most in the quantity and intensity of attention to these four conflicts, This was taken to mean that journalists' notions of proximity/relevance coincided with the foreign policy relevance of these conflicts. Secondly, Rapport gave consistently more attention to the regional contexts of conflicts, to the negative aspects of the civilian reaction and situation, and the aggressor was depicted in a more negative light in all four conflicts. The 9 O'Clock News tended to include more details of the military hostilities and there was a more cautious evaluation of the aggressor than in Rapport. The four cases show that the greater the foreign policy involvement of the country, the greater the number of foreign policy aspects were employed by television news to make sense of the conflicts.

    The results also supported previous research emphasising international similarities in the overall narrative structure of the news. These similarities were attributed to journalistic genres for reporting armed conflict. One possible explanation for different national perspectives on these conflicts is that societal norms get "translated" into media norms. Future research should thus look more closely at the interaction between societal and media factors-different national journalist cultures, in order to fully understand the way foreign conflicts are "nationalised".

  • 19.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    News of the other: tracing identity in Scandinavian constructions of the eastern Baltic sea region2004Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Politicotainment: television's take on the real2007Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Pondering the Future for Foreign News on National Television2011In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 5, p. 1567-1585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the ways television news media reinforce national perspectives incoverage of events outside their borders, and the potential consequences of this formainstream television news. International news, as it is seen on national television, isstill a rigid genre where people and events tend to be viewed either through nationalprisms or through generic characteristics common in hegemonic Anglo-American newssources. Globalization, in terms of the concentration of media ownership, and changingtelevision formats have done remarkably little to change agendas and narratives innational television news. Shifting geopolitical realities, the accessibility of different newssources, and the self-reflexivity of journalists due to changing industry demands shouldmake more of an impact on international news narratives. Some studies point to theexistence of narratives portraying other types of relationships than the national “we” andthe foreign “other,” but systematic studies are needed to see whether such stories haveincreased over time.

  • 22.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Processing Baltic News: Swedish Identity in Television Coverage of Latvia2002In: Storylines: Media, Power and Identity in Modern Europe / [ed] Hurd, Madeleine, Olsson, Tom & Åker, Patrik, Stockholm: Hjalmarson & Högberg , 2002Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    “ ‘Same Same but Different’: New Twists on Old Problems”2009In: Television and New Media, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 133-135Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Swedish and Danish television news of their baltic neighbors 1995-20002004In: News of the other: tracing identity in Scandinavian constructions of the eastern Baltic Sea region / [ed] Kristina Riegert, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2004, p. 125-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    “The End of the Iconic Home of Empire: Pondering the Move of the BBC World Service from the Bush House.”2010In: Media Houses: Architecture, media and the production of centrality., New York: Peter Lang , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    The ideology of The West Wing: The Television Show that Wants to be Real2007In: Politicotainment: Television's Take on the Real / [ed] Kristina Riegert, New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2007, p. 213-236Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    The Image War:: Nato's Battle for Kosovo in the British Media2003Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Understanding Popular Arab Bloggers: From Public Spheres to Cultural Citizens2015In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 9, p. 458-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the usefulness of the concepts public sphere, counterpublics, and cultural citizenship for understanding some of the most popular noncommercial Lebanese, Egyptian, and Kuwaiti bloggers in the period 2009–2010. It compares the political and media landscapes, drawing on semi-structured interviews and the most common blogging themes in these three contexts. While the notion of counterpublics was found useful for understanding some types of blogging community, cultural citizenship stands out as a more flexible, process-oriented concept capturing how bloggers acculturate information and entertainment as sources of empowerment, resistance, and community belonging. The popular bloggers can be characterized as having consumerist, civil society, or formal politics trajectories, each challenging traditional power structures in ways that can be traced to specific national contexts.

  • 29.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Collins, Sue
    Politainment2016In: The international encyclopedia of political communication / [ed] Gianpietro Mazzoleni, Oxford: John Wiley & Sons, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term politainment refers to the intertwining of politics and entertainment, and encompasses two processes: (1) political entertainment—how the entertainment industry exploits political topics in various entertainment formats; and (2) entertaining politics—how political actors capitalize on their celebrity (staging photo-ops, party convention spectacle, talk-show appearances, etc.) in order to enhance their images and to promote certain issues. When broadly defined, politainment moves beyond its association with infotainment to consider popular culture as a potential space for political insight and activity, and to acknowledge entertainment formats as sources of political knowledge, value orientation, and civic engagement. As a growing body of international scholarship attests, new hybrid media formats increasingly engage “political reality” across genres, conventional and new, in new television formats such as political satire and reality TV, fictionalized realism (in film, television, telenovelas, and interactive video games), and new variations of the celebrity media event genre. Such research recognizes that pleasures found in popular cultural formats of everyday life can also be ways of cultivating audiences' conscious motivations for political participation.

  • 30.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Hellman, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Robertson, Alexa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Mral, Brigitte
    hum, Örebro universitet.
    Transnational and National Media in Global Crisis: The Indian Ocean Tsunami2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Indian Ocean tsunami was one of the most devastating natural disasters of the modern age affecting hundreds of thousands of people from 40 countries. Some scholars saw the unprecedented “real time” news coverage and international outpouring of aid donations as examples of a cosmopolitan consciousness, while others maintain that in crisis the media look to our national leaders and institutions to act. The tsunami has also been described as a turning point for experienced television journalists, who in lieu of traditional notions of objectivity took on the role of crisis managers, and actively turned to the Internet as a means of helping people. From the vantage points of international communication, media globalization, and crisis journalism, this book addresses the links between national and transnational mediated spaces, crisis management, journalistic roles and ethics, and the mediation of distant suffering. Focusing on national and transnational news channels, it includes quantitative and qualitative text analyses, rhetorical analysis, journalist interviews, and focus group material.

  • 31.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Hoyden, Jan Fredrik
    Identity, Empathy and Argument: Immigrants in Culture and Entertainment Journalism in the Scandinavian Press2019In: Javnost - The Public, ISSN 1318-3222, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 158-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural and entertainment journalism deals with aesthetic experiences, advice on cultural consumption, as well as reflection and debate on ethical and moral humanistic issues. Does this sub-field of journalism systematically represent immigrants and integration differently than the other news and commentary articles? Comparing immigration discourse in a representative sample of six Scandinavian newspapers between 1970 and 2016 using content analysis we find that cultural journalism, while clearly reverbing with the dominant national issues at the time, did provide alternative perspectives. It not only brought up themes like racism, multiculturalism, national identity and religion more often, but was also more positive, more gender-balanced and more often gave a voice to immigrants than other news did. A closer qualitative reading further suggests a typology of ten main story-types, varying relatively little over time and across national borders. Cultural journalism in this case illustrates how the cultural public sphere can positively contribute to the debate of complicated issues in the public sphere by offering resources for identification, empathy and arguments for specific points of view.

  • 32.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Johansson, Anders
    Kampen om publiken och trovärdigheten under Irakkriget2004In: Irakkriget: perspektiv på politik och krigföring / [ed] Bengt Anderberg, Anders Cedergren, Stefan Ring, Jan Ångström, Stockholm: Krigsvetenskapliga institutionen, Försvarshögskolan , 2004, p. 313-334Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Johansson, Anders
    The struggle for credibility during the Iraq War2005In: The Iraq War: European perspectives on politics, strategy, and operations / [ed] Jan Hallenberg, Håkan Karlsson, New York: Routledge, 2005, p. 178-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Pettersson, Lucas
    'It's complicated' European media discourse on the USA from Reagan to Obama2011In: International journal of cultural studies, ISSN 1367-8779, E-ISSN 1460-356X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Media debates after the invasion of Iraq suggested that there was a growing anti-Americanism in Europe and that this contributed to an increasing sense of European identity as representing values that differed from that of the USA. But what if this anti-Americanism was really anti-Bushism, and how shared are the shared values on the European side when it comes to representation of the USA as Other? The articles in this Special Issue focus on the discursive image of the USA in the elite media of five European countries at points in time from a particularly frosty Cold War period under President Reagan until six months after the installation of President Obama. Taken together, there are broad similarities in the paradigms and characteristics used to depict the USA from the post-Cold War period, especially in French, Finnish, Swedish and German media. Below the surface, however, the narratives reveal that each country's commentators are mainly interested in the USA in relation to domestic concerns or as a prism for its relationships with other countries on the world stage. There is a stark focus on the US presidents as symbols through which the USA as a whole is seen. Both Democratic and Republican presidents are likened to Rambo, the 'space cowboy', the 'trade and cultural warrior', or Hollywood 'stars', which could be interpreted as a measure of cultural disdain towards American popular culture and militarism.

  • 35.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Ramsay, Gail
    Activists, Individualists, and Comics: The Counter-publicness of Lebanese Blogs2013In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 286-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines whether the ways Lebanese bloggers blur the boundaries between the national and transnational, the formal and informal, and entertainment and politics can be described as counter-publics. We focus on the ten most popular individual blogs in Lebanon during the time period April 2009-2010, noting bloggers' mutual connectivity and links to online media in Lebanon. We then analyze themes common to these blogs, focusing specifically on how Lebanese bloggers question the norms and push the boundaries of what can be said mediated public sphere. While there are differences between the bloggers not least due to whether they are writing in Arabic or English-almost all explicitly criticize the current sectarian system, human rights violations, as well as existing religious, gender and environmental norms. Whether they see themselves as cosmopolitan or locally based activists, a significant minority uses humor and political satire as key elements in their blogs.

  • 36.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Roosvall, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Cultural journalism as a contribution to democratic discourse in Sweden2017In: Cultural Journalism in the Nordic Countries / [ed] Nete Nørgaard Kristensen, Kristina Riegert, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2017, p. 89-108Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter traces the historical development of Swedish cultural journalism as a distinctive contributor to societal debate and aesthetic discourse in the mainstream media. How did Swedish cultural journalism come to have this dual focus on politics and artistic expression, and where does it stand in relation to today’s digital media landscape? The chapter deals with the hybrity of this sub-field of journalism, the meta-debates about its professionalisation and commercialisation, key cultural editors that staked out a space for cultural journalism in their newspapers and how the public service media gradually took on their own cultural journalistic roles in relation to the press.

  • 37.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Roosvall, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Cultural Journalism2018In: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Communication / [ed] Jon F. Nussbaum, Oxford University Press, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural journalism is a subfield of journalism that encompasses what is known as arts journalism. While arts journalism is characterized by reviews, critique, news, and essays about the arts and popular culture, cultural journalism has a broader take on culture, including lifestyle issues, societal debate, and reflective ethical discussion by cultural personas or expressed in a literary style. Both arts and cultural journalists see their work as “journalism with a difference,” evoking different perspectives and worldviews from those dominating mainstream news reporting. At the same time, cultural journalism shares with journalism issues like boundary work, genre blurring, digitalization, globalization, professionalization, and “the crisis of journalism.” There are three main ways cultural journalism has been studied: one research strand defines cultural journalism as material produced by the cultural desks or material that is explicitly labelled cultural journalism; another defines it as journalism about culture, regardless of how it is labelled or produced; and a third strand includes only arts journalism, examining journalistic content on the fine arts and popular culture. Studies from all of these approaches are included in this article due to the effort to include a wide variety of countries at different time periods and an effort to track joint defining features and developments in cultural journalism. The emphasis is on the Nordic context, where the term “cultural journalism” is well established and where research is relatively comprehensive. The research is divided into three themes: the cultural public sphere and the contribution to democracy; cultural journalism’s professionalism and the challenges of digitalization; and transnational and global aspects of cultural journalism, including tendencies such as cultural homogenization and hybridization.

    International research on cultural journalism as a subfield has been complicated by its varying designations (arts journalism, feuilleton, journalism about culture, entertainment), and its numerous aesthetic forms, disciplines, or types of culture, all of which are changing over time. Despite these issues, research points in the same direction: the amount of cultural journalism is increasing, and the boundaries against other types of journalism are becoming more porous. There is also a decline in editorial autonomy. In common with journalism, there is an increase in generalists working with culture and greater central managerial control in new multiplatform media organizations. The research points to an increase in a more transnationally oriented cultural journalism, mainly through a larger share of cultural news and popular culture—while its core, review and critique, has changed in character, or arguably lost ground. The increasing “newsification” of cultural journalism should prompt future research on whether the “watchdog” role vis-à-vis the cultural industries is growing. New forms of art and culture are beginning to get coverage, but also, in some cases, the intermixing of “lifestyle” with cultural journalism. The commercialization and celebrity aspects of this are clear, but new digital platforms have also enabled new voices and different formats of cultural journalism and a wider dissemination and intensity in cultural debates, all of which emphasize its democratic potential. New research on this subject appears to focus on the longitudinal changes in cultural journalism, the implications of digitalization and globalization, and cultural journalism in broadcasting.

  • 38.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Roosvall, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Widholm, Andreas
    The political in cultural journalism: Fragmented interpretative communities in the digital age2015In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 773-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how nine Swedish cultural editors and managers in mainstream media institutions define cultural journalism and its political dimensions during times of increased digitization and media convergence. Swedish cultural journalism is aesthetic and political critique applied to subject areas (music, literature, etc.) and contemporary societal and ethical issues. Drawing on Zelizer we ask whether there is a common interpretive community of cultural journalists in different media regarding: (1) how they define their scope, (2) how they understand “the political” in cultural journalism and its implications for democracy, and (3) how they view media convergence and digitalization. We find that although editors/managers from different media share a basic understanding of cultural journalism as an alternative perspective to news, “the political” in cultural journalism is approached differently in the press and the public service broadcast media. Furthermore, due in part to structural conditions, they also see the effects of digitization differently, forming sub-communities on two counts. This study thus contributes new knowledge to a field previously focused almost exclusively on newspapers.

  • 39.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    The Difference Culture Makes Comparing Swedish news and cultural journalism on the 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris2019In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 3-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although terrorist attacks in Europe have increasingly been carried out on cultural targets such as media institutions, concert halls and leisure venues, most research on media and terrorism draws conclusions based on traditional hard news stories rather than on journalism specialising in cultural issues. This study explores the distinctiveness of Swedish cultural journalism by comparing it to news journalism, using the 2015 terror attacks in Paris as a case study. Our content analysis reveals that whereas news journalism is mainly descriptive, focusing on the short-term consequences of terrorism, security frames and political elites and eyewitnesses as sources, cultural journalism is more interpretive, giving a voice first and foremost to cultural elites. The cultural filter put on this event means a focus on the longer term implications of terrorism and instead of engaging in the hunt for the perpetrators, there is greater emphasis on the societal dilemmas that terrorism accentuates, especially the democratic values that are at stake. However, our results also show that the ongoing journalistification of cultural journalism, as defined by a stronger prevalence of descriptive style, blurs the lines between news and cultural journalism.

  • 40.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Åker, Patrik
    Media and Communication Studies, Södertörns Högskola.
    Knowing me, knowing you: mediated identities in the eastern Baltic Sea region2004In: News of the other: tracing identity in Scandinavian constructions of the eastern Baltic Sea region / [ed] Kristina Riegert, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2004, p. 71-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Roosvall, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Kulturjournalistik2015In: Handbok i journalistikforskning / [ed] Michael Karlsson, Jesper Strömbäck, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, p. 263-282Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Widholm, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Roosvall, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Abundance or crisis? Transformations in the media ecology of Swedish cultural journalism over four decades2019In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to map and scrutinize developments within Swedish cultural journalism, with a particular focus on transformations in genres, text types and thematic repertoires. Drawing on a constructed week sample from press, television and radio during four decades (1985, 1995, 2005, 2015), we address three aspects of 'the crisis discourse' of cultural journalism: (1) the potential decline in cultural coverage due to economic cutbacks and downsized cultural desks; (2) cultural journalism's perceived 'quality crisis' connected to transformations of thematic repertoires; and (3) the alleged decline of cultural expertise related to changes in cultural journalism's generic structures. The study makes a unique contribution to cultural journalism scholarship by identifying media-specific differences and complementary relationships between media forms, building on media ecology and genre theory. In contrast to the crisis discourse, results show that cultural journalism has expanded significantly through popularization and thematic and generic diversification, but the transformations are different in press, radio and television due to differing role positions in the larger media ecosystem. In addition, some parts of the cultural journalism media ecology appear to be endangered.

1 - 42 of 42
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