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  • 1.
    Bygren, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Kumlin, Johanna
    The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Mechanisms of Organizational Segregation: Organizational Characteristics and the Sex of Newly Recruited Employees2005In: Work and Occupations, Vol. 32, p. 39-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the process underlying sex segregation at the organizational level by focusing on the process through which organizations renew their workforce. The authors used a sample of 1,460 Swedish workplaces that recruited 75,261 employees during the period 1991 to 1995. The results indicate that the most important factor in reproducing segregation at the organizational level is sex segregation in the occupations from which organizations recruit their personnel. Organizations’ sex composition is to a very high degree determined by the sex composition of the occupations they employ. In addition, large organizations and expanding organizations tend to make more sex-atypical recruitments compared with other organizations.

  • 2.
    Bygren, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Kumlin, Johanna
    The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Mechanisms of Organizational Segregation: Organizational Characteristics and the Sex of Newly Recruited Employees2005In: Work and Occupations, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 39-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the process underlying sex segregation at the organizational level by focusing on the process through which organizations renew their workforce. The authors used a sample of 1,460 Swedish workplaces that recruited 75,261 employees during the period 1991 to 1995. The results indicate that the most important factor in reproducing segregation at the organizational level is sex segregation in the occupations from which organizations recruit their personnel. Organizations’ sex composition is to a very high degree determined by the sex composition of the occupations they employ. In addition, large organizations and expanding organizations tend to make more sex-atypical recruitments compared with other organizations.

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