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  • 1.
    Cortes, Diana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Laukka, Petri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology.
    Asperholm, Martin
    Fredborg, William
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Xiao, Shanshan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Högman, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Dang, Junhua
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Intranasal Oxytocin and Response Inhibition in Young and Older Adults2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In normal aging, people are confronted with impairment in both socioemotional and cognitive abilities. Specifically, there are age-related declines in inhibitory processes that regulate attention towards irrelevant material. In last years, the intranasal administration of the neuropeptide oxytocin has mainly been related to improvements in several domains such as emotion recognition and memory, but to date the effects of oxytocin in aging remain largely unknown. In a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, within-subjects study design, we investigated whether oxytocin facilitates inhibitory processing in older adults compared to younger adults. In total, 41 older adults (51% women; age range 65-75 years) and 37 younger adults (49% women; age range 20-30 years) participated in this study two times, receiving a single intranasal dose of 40 IU of placebo and oxytocin in randomized order 45 minutes before engaging in the task. Participants were tested approximately a month apart and mostly at the same hour during both occasions. Inhibition was measured with a Go/NoGo task which included happy and neutral faces as targets (Go stimuli) and distractors (NoGo stimuli) shown on a computer screen. Participants were instructed to press a button any time they saw a target and remain passive when encountering a distractor. Preliminary results indicate effects for happy and neutral faces, but only in the distractor condition. For happy distractors, women rejected correctly happy faces more accurately than men did, both in the placebo and oxytocin conditions. A main effect of age was observed for the neutral distractors, where older adults were more successful in inhibiting responses than younger adults during oxytocin and placebo treatments. We did not observe effects of oxytocin in the different tasks. The role of oxytocin was not clear distinguished in the tasks. In sum, our findings showed that age and gender can influence inhibition but their effects depend on the displayed emotions. This suggests that the ability to inhibit interfering distractors may remain intact despite of age and that deficits in inhibition may be selective. The role of oxytocin in inhibition needs to be further investigated since it is possible that it is context dependent.

  • 2.
    Cortes, Diana S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Skragge, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Laukka, Petri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology.
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Nilsson, Mats E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Hovey, Daniel
    Westberg, Lars
    Larsson, Marcus
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Mixed support for a causal link between single dose intranasal oxytocin and spiritual experiences: opposing effects depending on individual proclivities for absorption2018In: Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience, ISSN 1749-5016, E-ISSN 1749-5024, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 921-932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intranasal oxytocin (OT) has previously been found to increase spirituality, an effect moderated by OT-related genotypes. This pre-registered study sought to conceptually replicate and extend those findings. Using a single dose of intranasal OT vs placebo (PL), we investigated experimental treatment effects, and moderation by OT-related genotypes on spirituality, mystical experiences, and the sensed presence of a sentient being. A more exploratory aim was to test for interactions between treatment and the personality disposition absorption on these spirituality-related outcomes. A priming plus sensory deprivation procedure that has facilitated spiritual experiences in previous studies was used. The sample (N = 116) contained both sexes and was drawn from a relatively secular context. Results failed to conceptually replicate both the main effects of treatment and the treatment by genotype interactions on spirituality. Similarly, there were no such effects on mystical experiences or sensed presence. However, the data suggested an interaction between treatment and absorption. Relative to PL, OT seemed to enhance spiritual experiences in participants scoring low in absorption and dampen spirituality in participants scoring high in absorption.

  • 3. Döllinger, Dominik
    et al.
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Transferring Emotions -  A social practice?2016In: Abstracts: The 7th Midterm Conference on Emotions, Stockholm, 2016, p. 6-7Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This interdisciplinary study aims to interpret the concept of ‘transference’ and particularly ‘transference of emotions’ in the light of practice theory. The idea of transference was made prominent as an important aspect of human interaction in general, and psychotherapeutic interaction in particular, by Sigmund Freud (1912/1959). Since then it was used, tested and refined by many scholars and is effectively utilized in psychodynamic therapies and psychoanalysis. It roughly denotes the process by which previously developed and established interaction patterns with significant others are transferred to new interactions and relationships. These patterns include expectations, motivations, and especially emotions. Experimental research has for example shown that affects that are associated with a significant other representation are transferred to a new target person when the target person resembles the significant other (Andersen & Baum, 1994) and that the representationconsistent affect is even reflected in a person’s facial affective expressions (Andersen, Reznik, & Manzella, 1996). We hold and want to demonstrate that the concept of transference can not only be utilized in psychotherapy, but also in sociology. We will, thus, look at processes of transference from a practice theoretical perspective. Based on previous experimental research and with a special focus on ‘transference of emotions’ we show that transference denotes a socialization process in which emotional states and responses are unconsciously acquired, embodied, and reproduced throughout the individual’s life-course. These ‘emotional narratives’ signal a general ‘emotional sense’ that shapes social interactionmuch in the same way as the ‘practical sense’ that was identified by Bourdieu. It is, in other words, an unconscious and habitual emotional pattern in social interaction, that is learned and embodied by an individual in the course of its socialization. Practice theory and the sociology of emotions can not only benefit from these psychological insights but, more importantly, provide a valuable framework and contribution for its further theorizing.

  • 4.
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Novice psychotherapists’ emotion recognition abilities2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Döllinger, Lillian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bänziger, Tanja
    Högman, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Makower, Irena
    Laukka, Petri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cortes, Diana S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hau, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Improving psychotherapeutic competencies using socioemotional perceptual training procedures 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Döllinger, Lillian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Högman, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Bänziger, Tanja
    Laukka, Petri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology.
    Makower, Irena
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Hau, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    The effectiveness of a dynamic multimodal emotion recognition accuracy training program2019In: Program: ISRE 2019 Amsterdam, 2019, p. 165-165, article id 77Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Computerized trainings for emotion recognition accuracy (ERA) have shown to be successful, however, are often lacking external validity. The use of still pictures, the focus on the face, and limited response sets limit generalizability of findings. Further, trainings often use between-subjectsdesigns and short time intervals between, or same items for ERA training and outcome measure. In response, we developed and evaluated a multi-modal ERA training in a randomized controlled trial.

    Method: Seventy-two undergraduate students (M=24.7, SD=7.69, 75% women) signed up for the study; 68 completed all measurements. They were randomly assigned to the multimodal ERA training or one of two control conditions. The ERA outcome measure (ERAM; Laukka et al., 2015) assesses 12 emotions separately in three modalities (audio, video, audio-video) using 72 dynamic stimuli. The multimodal training consisted and immediate and extensive feedback using different items. The last training session and the ERA outcome measurement lay approximately one week apart.

    Results and Conclusions: A repeated-measures ANOVA with baseline as covariate showed a main effect of training on the ERAM, F(2/63) = 8.04, p < .001, ηp2 = .20. Bonferroni-corrected posthoc tests revealed the change for the multimodal training was significantly superior to the control conditions (p=.001; p=.003). Detailed results per modality and descriptive statistics will be presented. Due to its multimodal and dynamic nature, delay between training and outcome measure and use of different items, the multimodal training is a promising tool for training ERA in different contexts, like clinical settings, assessment procedures or law enforcement training.

  • 7.
    Döllinger, Lillian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Högman, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Bänziger, Tanja
    Laukka, Petri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Makower, Irena
    Magnusson, Tova
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Spejare, Amanda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cortes, Diana S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N.T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Manzouri, Amirhossein
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Hau, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Effectively training emotion recognition accuracy: The evaluation of two systematic training programs2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents findings about the effectiveness of two computerized training-programs for emotion recognition accuracy that were evaluated in a double-blind randomized controlled study with repeated measures design. Both trainings are effective in training emotion recognition accuracy. The trainings and results are presented in detail and practical implications are discussed.

  • 8. Gordon, Amy R.
    et al.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Vestbrant, Karolina
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Olsson, Mats J.
    Lundström, Johan N.
    Partner’s body odor lowers stress discomfort2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9. Gordon, Amy R.
    et al.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Vestbrant, Karolina
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Olsson, Mats J.
    Lundström, Johan N.
    Partner’s body odor lowers stress symptoms2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Vestbrant, Karolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Liuzza, Marco Tullio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology. University of Catanzaro, Italy.
    Olsson, Mats J.
    Blomkvist, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Lundström, Johan N.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Monell Chemical Senses Center, USA; University of Pennsylvania, USA.
    The scent of security: Odor of romantic partner alters subjective discomfort and autonomic stress responses in an adult attachment-dependent manner2019In: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 198, p. 144-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When in a stressful situation, access to adult attachment figures (e.g., romantic partners) is an important means by which adults regulate stress responses. The practice of smelling a partner's worn garment is reported as a self-treatment against stress. Here, we experimentally determined whether exposure to a partner's body odor attenuates adults' subjective discomfort and psychophysiological responses, and whether such effects are qualified by adult attachment security. In a blocked design, participants (N = 34) were presented with their partner's body odor, their own body odor, the odor of a clean t-shirt and rose odor, while exposed to weak electric shocks to induce discomfort and stress responses. Results showed that partner body odor reduces subjective discomfort during a stressful event, as compared with the odor of oneself. Also, highly secure participants had attenuated skin conductance when exposed to partner odor. We conclude that partner odor is a scent of security, especially for attachment-secure adults.

  • 11. Letellier, Isabelle
    et al.
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Högman, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neal, Emma
    Laukka, Petri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bänziger, Tanja
    Makower, Irena
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hau, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Assessing the impact of attachment on emotion recognition: accuracy scores and types of confusion2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12. Letellier, Isabelle
    et al.
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Högman, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neal, Emma
    Laukka, Petri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bänziger, Tanja
    Makower, Irena
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hau, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Avoidant attachment impairs global accuracy in emotion recognition2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13. Letellier, Isabelle
    et al.
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Högman, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neal, Emma
    Laukka, Petri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bänziger, Tanja
    Makower, Irena
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hau, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The role of the psychotherapist’s perception of emotion in therapy: Presentation of a Forte-Marie Curie Project2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Lindgren, Thomas E.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Schuster, Patrick
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hau, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    How do therapists learn to become therapists: A literature review2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a relatively large body of literature on how psychotherapy education should be taught and learned. Less attention has been directed towards how therapists learn. The aim of the present literature review is to consider research published from 2000 until present concerning learning processes in psychotherapy and supervision. The main questions were: What is the scope and quality of available research and what is considered known and unknown concerning how therapists learn to become psychotherapists. Search and selection criteria were developed and tested for reliability. Subsequent searches were performed using the Proquest multi database platform. An analysis of findings generated so far suggests a continued lack of research on how psychotherapists learn their trade. Implications of this finding are further discussed.

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