Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Låstad, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    A 5-year Multilevel Investigation of the Relations Between Job Insecurity, Informational Justice and Work Attitudes2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The negative effects of job insecurity on work attitudes are well-known. The uncertainty management theory (UMT) suggests that organisational justice may help to deal with the stressor job insecurity. This study presents the results of a multi-level investigation on the moderating influence of informational justice on the negative effects of quantitative and qualitative job insecurity on work attitudes. Full data of 183 Swedish accountants, five time points with one-year time lags, confirmed the predictions based on the UMT. The few studies that tested this proposition found generally confirming results. This study adds to the current knowledge with several accounts. One is that qualitative job insecurity, anticipation of losing valued job features, is included whereas previous research has only dealt with the general worry of job loss. Second the focus is on informational justice as a moderator which has been neglected so far although more likely to buffer the negative effects on work attitudes. Third, the data is analysed in a multi-level fashion such that the fluctuation of job insecurity and organisational justice over the time of five years and the common between-person differences are investigated simultaneously. Organisations that undergo changes that create job insecurity in their employees may offset the negative consequences by using informational justice.

  • 2.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Richter, Anne
    Låstad, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Meta-Analysis on Job Insecurity and its Outcomes: An Extension of Previous Knowledge2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Job insecurity has been recognized as a predominant work stressor in work environment research for the past thirty years. Thus far, two meta-analyses have been published on the consequences of job insecurity for individual and organizational outcomes. However, these meta-analyses were published in 2002 and 2008 and contain only a few broad outcomes. Since then, the amount of published job insecurity studies have increased substantially, investigating a wider range of outcomes. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to extend previous knowledge by investigating the effects of job insecurity on a broader spectrum of outcomes than the previous meta-analyses have done.

    Design/Methodology: Literature searches with the search terms “job insecurity”, “job uncertainty”, “job security”, and “job security satisfaction” in relevant databases during the time period 1980─2016 resulted in 523 peer-reviewed papers published. The outcome variables were divided in to three thematic categories: work related attitudes and behaviors, mental and physical health, and life outside work.

    Results: The results suggest that job insecurity has a substantial and negative impact on the wide range of outcomes included.

    Limitations: The study cannot address the question of direction (causality) of the relationships presented and did not control for potential confounding variables.

    Research/Practical implications: Job insecurity is demonstrated to have strong, negative effects on organizational performance and individual health and well-being as well as for life outside work.

    Originality/Value: Adding to previous knowledge, this study both broadens and deepens the understanding of the negative consequences associated with job insecurity.

  • 3.
    Låstad, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Job insecurity climate: On shared perceptions of job insecurity2012In: In-Mind Magazine, ISSN 1877-5306, no 16, 1-4 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With increased global competition in business and ever higher demands of flexibility, job insecurity is something that most employees will experience sooner or later. Anticipating job loss is an agonizing state of mind. In fact, experiencing insecurity related to the continuity of one’s job is regarded as more stressful than actually losing it. However, job insecurity perceptions do not arise out of nothing. They are of course embedded in a social context. Consider the ‘second great contraction’, the financial crisis that started in 2007 and the recession that followed it (e.g. Reihart & Rogoff, 2009): Watching the news and hearing about negative trends in employment rates, hearing about friends or family worrying about their future income, worrying about the future of your own job – it does something to you. Add to this picture that job insecurity can be shared within an organization, for instance amongst your coworkers. It thus becomes a shared perception, a climate of job insecurity. The aim of this article is to give a brief description of existing research on job insecurity, and to introduce the job insecurity climate construct to a broader audience.

  • 4.
    Låstad, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    To what extent do core self-evaluations and coping style influence the perception of job insecurity?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Job insecurity is a modern day work stressor, experienced by workers worldwide. Over the last few decades, increased flexibility and lack of stability in employment has made job insecurity a work stressor that keeps affecting more and more employees. Increased flexibility and lack of stability in employment makes individuals responsible for staying employable and securing their job. Among the individual-level negative consequences are threats to well-being, health and work attitudes. Stress theory explains how primary and secondary appraisal determines the perception of a stressor and eventual strain. This implicates that how individuals experience and interpret contextual clues influences their perception of job insecurity. The notion of such a link has been supported by previous research where relations between job insecurity and certain personality traits have been found. However, the single trait-approach has been criticized as it makes it difficult to compare results and develop theory further.

    Aim: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between core self-evaluations and job insecurity, and the possible mediating effect of coping style.

    Methods: The study investigated to what extent core self-evaluations influence the appraisal of job insecurity in a Swedish sample of white-collar workers (N=425). By applying the Preacher & Hayes’ macro for multiple mediation, the study also tested if there was a mediating effect of coping style on the relation between core self-evaluations and job insecurity. Data was collected in 2004 and 2005.

    Results and Conclusion: The results show that core self-evaluations have predictive validity in relation to job insecurity. Core self-evaluations are also associated with task-based coping style. However, no mediating effect of coping style was found on the relation between core self-evaluations and job insecurity.

  • 5.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    Measuring quantitative and qualitative aspects of the job insecurity climate: Scale validation2015In: Career Development International, ISSN 1362-0436, E-ISSN 1758-6003, Vol. 20, no 3, 202-217 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a measure of job insecurity climate by: first, testing whether job insecurity climate and individual job insecurity are two separate constructs; and second, investigating the relative importance of individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate in predicting work-related and health-related outcomes.

    Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected by questionnaires in a simple stratified random sample of 1,380 white-collar workers in Sweden. The response rate was 56 percent.

    Findings – Confirmatory factor analyses showed that job insecurity climate was distinct from individual job insecurity. Four separate ridge regression analyses showed that qualitative job insecurity climate was a significant predictor of demands, work-family conflict, psychological distress, and poor self-rated health and that quantitative job insecurity climate predicted demands and work-family conflict.

    Research limitations/implications – The study is based on self-reports, which may involve common method bias. The cross-sectional study design limits the possibility to make causal inferences regarding the relationship between job insecurity climate and outcomes.

    Practical implications – Future studies may consider measuring job insecurity climate in line with a referent-shift model. Work environment surveys in organizations that include measures of individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate can provide practitioners with a fuller picture of the psychosocialwork environment.

    Originality/value – The present study adds to previous research by introducing a new approach to measuring and conceptualizing job insecurity climate.

  • 6.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Canterbury , New Zealand.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Canterbury, New Zealand; North-West University, South Africa.
    Do core self-evaluations and coping style influence the perception of job insecurity?2014In: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 1359-432X, E-ISSN 1464-0643, Vol. 23, no 5, 680-692 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last few decades, increased flexibility and lack of stability in employment has made job insecurity a work stressor that affects more and more employees. Since worrying about potential job loss (quantitative job insecurity) or possible loss of valued job features (qualitative job insecurity) constitutes a subjective perception, it has been claimed that personality factors may be decisive for job insecurity perceptions. Furthermore, the perception of a stressor, in this case job insecurity, could be argued to be dependent on appraisals of available coping resources. This study investigates whether core self-evaluations predict job insecurity perceptions, and whether coping mediates this relationship, in a two-wave data set from a Swedish sample of white-collar workers (N = 425). The results show that core self-evaluations had a negative total effect on both qualitative and quantitative job insecurity. Core self-evaluations were positively related to problem-focused coping but not to emotion-focused coping. However, there was no mediating effect of coping style on the association between core self-evaluations and job insecurity.

  • 7.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm Stress Center, Sweden.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm Stress Center, Sweden.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm Stress Center, Sweden.
    Job insecurity climate perceptions: Scale validation and a qualitative exploration2012In: Book of Proceedings: 10th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology / [ed] Jain, A., Hollis, D., Andreou, N., Wehrle, F., Nottingham: European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology , 2012, 32-33 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Job insecurity is a modern work stressor negatively affecting work attitudes, wellbeing and the health of employees worldwide. It has mainly been investigated as an individual level phenomenon, but drawing on the theoretical framework of social cognitive theory, it could be argued that job insecurity is also a social phenomenon. Behavioral, cognitive or other person-related factors as well as contextual factors interact in a reciprocal relationship, and shape individuals’ perceptions and interpretations of organizational events. Shared perceptions of job insecurity could be referred to as a job insecurity climate (Sora, Caballer, Peiró, & De Witte, 2009). However, it is not yet clear how job insecurity climate should be conceptualized. The multiple operationalizations of climate constructs found in organizational research, along with methodological concerns, motivates a study on the concept of job insecurity climate.

    Aims:

    (1)   A qualitative exploration the job insecurity climate construct

    (2)   A validation study of a newly developed measure of job insecurity climate

    Methods: Interviews were conducted with job insecure informants and informants working in organizations undergoing organizational change and who could be expected to experience some degree of job insecurity. Their participation was secured through snowball sampling, and a thematic analysis was conducted on the transcribed interviews. Further, questionnaire items for measuring job insecurity climate were developed, and data is currently being collected. The data collection will be finalized late November 2011.

    Results/relevance: Preliminary results of the interview study gave an indication of how the job insecurity climate construct can be conceptualized. The thematic analysis revealed that the whole organization needs not be the social unit of a climate. The job insecure climate could rather be ascribed to specific groups, like for instance a group of professionals (e.g. computer technicians), a demographic group (e.g. female doctoral students), or a geographically defined unit (e.g. a branch office of a company). Depending on the focus of the study, job insecurity climate could be conceptualized either as a psychological climate or as an organizational climate. The validation of the questionnaire items will contribute further to our understanding of the job insecurity climate construct.

  • 8.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The job insecurity climate scale: Creating and testing a measure for job insecurity climates2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Job insecurity, conceptualized as “the perception of a potential threat to the continuity of the current job” is a work stressor that is associated with negative consequences for well-being, health and work attitudes. So far, the individual has been the main unit of interest for research on job insecurity. However, job insecurity can also be seen as a social phenomenon, where the fous is on shared perceptions of job insecurity – a job insecurity climate. The social cognitive theory explains how behavioral, cognitive or other person-related and contextual factors interact in a reciprocal relationship. Related to job insecurity, then, this can help us understand how job insecurity climate can emerge.

    Previously, a few studies have been published on job insecurity climate. But the measuring of job insecurity climate is still a relatively new area of interest to researchers. The multiple operationalizations of organizational climate found in organizational research along with methodological concerns, motivates a study on the concept of job insecurity climate and ways of measuring it.

    Aim: The purpose of this study is to develop and test an instrument for measuring job insecurity climate.

    Methods: As a first step, questionnaire items were developed to reflect job insecurity at a group level. Further, the study compared results from the newly developed job insecurity climate scale with aggregated individual-level data on job insecurity. The aim is to evaluate which type of scale of measurement is more appropriate for capturing job insecurity climate. The data will be collected in early 2011.

    Results/relevance: The purpose of this study is to contribute to our understanding of job insecurity in general, as well as job insecurity climates in particular, and its consequences for employees.

  • 9.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury, New Zeeland.
    Richter, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sverige.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    30 års forskning om anställningsotrygghet: En litteraturöversikt2016In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 22, no 3/4, 8-27 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Anställningsotrygghet – en oro för att mot sin vilja förlora jobbet – är något som de flesta anställda idag upplever under sina yrkesliv. Den beteendevetenskapliga forskningen inom detta område har skjutit fart sedan millennieskiftet, vilket motiverar behovet av en uppdaterad litteraturöversikt. Översikten omfattar prediktorer och konsekvenser av anställningsotrygghet samt vilka faktorer som har identifierats som viktiga när det gäller att mildra anställningsotrygghetens konsekvenser.

  • 10.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Richter, Anne
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Do the Consequences of Job Insecurity Differ between Cultural and Welfare Contexts? Meta-Analytic Findings2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: A rapidly growing body of literature has shown that perceptions of job insecurity are related to negative outcomes, but less is known about the relative importance of different societal contexts. It has for instance been argued that the consequences of job insecurity may be more negative in countries that have a high level of social protection, because of the social stigma of unemployment. On the other hand, the lack of unemployment insurance programs may aggravate the negative consequences. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate if work- and health-related consequences of job insecurity vary between cultural and welfare contexts.

    Design/Methodology: A literature search with the search terms “job insecurity”, “job uncertainty”, “job security”, and “job security satisfaction” in Psycinfo, Web of Science, and EBSCO produced a sample of 523 peer-reviewed papers published between 1980 and July 2016. Economic and social development, national welfare system, and tolerance for ambiguity were tested as moderators in the relationship between job insecurity and outcomes.

    Results: The results indicate that the magnitudes of effects of job insecurity differ depending on the choice of classification system.

    Limitations: The literature search was limited to published, peer-reviewed papers. This demarcation may have introduced a publication bias to the study.

    Research/Practical implications: In addition to being an important individual and organizational concern, job insecurity is also intimately linked with societal level factors.

    Originality/Value: This study contributes to an increased understanding of the importance of macro-level factors in the association between job insecurity and outcomes.

  • 11.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand .
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Roles of Shared Perceptions of Job Insecurity and Job Insecurity Climate for Work- and Health-Related Outcomes: A Multilevel ApproachManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine job insecurity from a multilevel perspective and to investigate the roles of two types of job insecurity – job insecurity climate and individual job insecurity – for work-related attitudes and health outcomes. We further explore the role of the workgroup – as a social context – in shaping job insecurity perceptions. Data was collected from white-collar employees in a Swedish organization, with 126 participants nested in 18 groups. The results show that 19% of the variance in job insecurity climate perceptions, and none of the variance in individual job insecurity perceptions, could be attributed to group membership. Further, compared to other members of their group, those perceiving a stronger job insecurity climate reported lower levels of negative self-rated health and higher burnout scores. These results imply that the workgroup is an important social context for job insecurity climate perceptions and, thus, that leaders should take job insecurity climate perceptions at the workgroup level into account.

  • 12.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Investigating Job Insecurity Climate from a Multilevel Perspective: Its Impact on Psychological Distress, and Ill-Health Symptoms2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Job insecurity is a work stressor that has detrimental effects on work related attitudes, well-being and health. Job insecurity has mainly been investigated as an individual level phenomenon. Consequentially, the focus of past research is only on personal determinants and consequences of the employee’s perception, and social/organizational factors have not been taken into account to any large extent. However, drawing on sense making theory, it can be argued that job insecurity is a social phenomenon as well. Conceptualized as job insecurity climate, job insecurity could be considered a product of the reciprocal relationship between behavior, cognitive and other personal factors, and the social environment.

    The aim of this study is to examine job insecurity from a multilevel perspective and explore to what extent the variance in job insecurity perceptions is dependent on the individual, and how important the work group as a social context in shaping job insecurity perceptions. We also aim to investigate the effects of job insecurity, both climate and individual job insecurity, on job satisfaction, productivity, burnout, and subjective health. By including both individual level job insecurity and job insecurity climate perceptions in the analysis, a deeper understanding is gained of the relation between job insecurity and negative outcomes, and thus contributes to extending our knowledge about job insecurity as a work life stressor.

    Results from a pilot study of a Swedish sample using multilevel modeling showed that the work group accounts for about 5% of the variance in job insecurity climate perceptions and 2.6% of individual job insecurity perceptions. This indicates that the social context has some impact on perceptions of job insecurity. However, since the respondents in this sample perceived a very low sense of job insecurity, these results had to be replicated with another sample. Data from a second sample (N=126) were recently collected, and preliminary results show that belonging to a group accounted for 20% of the variance in job insecurity climate perceptions and 0% of the variance in perceptions of  job insecurity. These results could have implications for future studies on climate, indicating that perceptions of one’s own job insecurity do not necessarily match one’s perceptions of the job insecurity climate.

  • 13.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Investigating job insecurity climate from a multilevel perspective: Outcomes and methodological challenges2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Job insecurity is a work stressor that has detrimental effects on work related attitudes, well being and health. In psychological research, studies on job insecurity focus on the subjective perception of insecurity and not on the objective circumstances. Job insecurity has mainly been investigated as an individual level phenomenon. Consequentially, the focus of this research is only on personal determinants and consequences of the employee’s perception, and social/organizational factors are not taken into account. Drawing on social cognitive theory, it can be argued that job insecurity is a social phenomenon as well. Conceptualized as job insecurity climate, job insecurity could be seen as a product of the reciprocal relationship between behavior, cognitive and other personal factors, and the social environment. Previous studies on job insecurity climate used aggregated individual level data from individual level job insecurity scales. However, a possible limitation of this research is that aggregating individual level data does not necessarily reflect a social climate. In this study, we measure job insecurity climate with a scale that contains organizational level referents. Thus, the study contributes to answering pressing methodological questions in research on job insecurity climate. Aim: The aim of this study is to examine job insecurity conceptualized both as a psychological climate and as an organizational climate. We also aim to investigate possible effects on work related attitudes and subjective health. Methods: The data were collected in a Swedish organization (N=1280) through online questionnaires with a response rate of 73%. The questionnaire consisted of validated scales measuring individual level perceptions of job insecurity, job insecurity climate, work related attitudes and subjective health outcomes. Analyses and results: We will perform multi-level analyses on the data set. Conclusion: Including both individual perceptions and climate in the analysis will provide a deeper understanding of the relation between job insecurity and negative outcomes, thereby contributing to deepening our knowledge about job insecurity as a work life stressor. Furthermore, comparing job insecurity conceptualized as a psychological climate with job insecurity as an organizational climate will contribute to the methodological discussion about how to best conceptualize job insecurity climate.

  • 14.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Investigating job insecurity climate from a multilevel perspective: Outcomes and methodological challenges2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Vander Elst, Tinne
    De Witte, Hans
    On the reciprocal relationship between individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate2016In: Career Development International, ISSN 1362-0436, E-ISSN 1758-6003, Vol. 21, no 3, 246-261 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate over time. Design/methodology/approach– Data were collected among readers of a Flemish Human Resources magazine. The data collection was repeated three times, resulting in a longitudinal dataset with information from 419 employees working in Flanders. A cross-lagged design was used in which both individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate were modeled at all times and reciprocal relationships between these constructs could be investigated. Findings– The results showed that perceptions of individual job insecurity were related to perceiving a climate of job insecurity six months later. However, no evidence was found for the effect of job insecurity climate on individual job insecurity. This suggests that job insecurity origins in the individual’s perceptions of job insecurity and subsequently expands to include perceptions of a job insecurity climate at the workplace. Research limitations/implications– First, the data used in this study were collected solely by self-reports, which could have introduced a common method bias to the study. Second, as with all non-experimental studies, the possibility that a third variable could have affected the results cannot categorically be ruled out. Practical implications– Managers and human resource practitioners who wish to prevent job insecurity in organizations may consider focussing on individual job insecurity perceptions when planning preventive efforts. Originality/value– By investigating the relationship between individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate over time, this study contributes to the understanding of job insecurity, both as an individual and a social phenomenon.

  • 16.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Vander Elst, Tinne
    IDEWE, External Service for Prevention and Protection at Work, Belgium.
    De Witte, Hans
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    On the reciprocal relationship between individual job insecurity and job insecurity climateManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate over time.

    Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected among readers of a Flemish Human Resources magazine. The data collection was repeated three times, resulting in a longitudinal dataset with information from 419 employees working in Flanders (Belgium). A cross-lagged design was used in which both individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate were modelled at all times and reciprocal relationships between these constructs could be investigated.

    Findings – The results showed that perceptions of individual job insecurity were related to perceiving a climate of job insecurity six months later. However, no evidence was found for the effect of job insecurity climate on individual job insecurity. This suggests that job insecurity origins in the individual’s perceptions of job insecurity and subsequently spreads to include perceptions of job insecurity at the workplace.

    Research limitations – Firstly, the data used in this study were collected solely by self-reports, which could have introduced a common method bias to the study. Secondly, as with all non-experimental studies, the possibility that a third variable could have affected the results cannot categorically be ruled out.

    Practical implications – Managers and Human Resource-practitioners who wish to prevent job insecurity in organizations may consider focusing on individual job insecurity perceptions when planning preventive efforts.

    Originality/value – By investigating the relationship between individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate over time, this study contributes to our understanding of job insecurity, both as an individual and a social phenomenon.

  • 17.
    Sverke, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Låstad, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Job Insecurity and its Consequences: What do we know and where to go?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    State of the art: Job insecurity – worrying about losing one’s job – is a common concern among workers worldwide. Since the early 1980s, the research literature in this field has been steadily growing, establishing job insecurity as a work-related stressor with detrimental outcomes for both employees and organizations. However, there are still a number of important research gaps, including how job insecurity relates to a wide range of potential outcomes, whether the strength of these associations vary between national contexts, the direction of causality between insecurity and outcomes, and how organizations may reduce job insecurity perceptions.

    New perspectives/contributions: This symposium presents a comprehensive overview of the current state of job insecurity research. Specifically, the first presentation summarizes findings from a meta-analysis linking job insecurity to several work attitudes and behaviors, and different physical and mental health outcomes. The second study takes a closer look at these meta-analytic results by investigating if the negative consequences of job insecurity vary between cultural and welfare contexts. The third presentation provides an overview of longitudinal studies of the relationship between job insecurity and outcomes, also reviewing the evidence concerning temporal precedence and causality. The fourth study reports on the results of an organizational intervention in an organization undergoing restructuring, where one aim was to reduce job insecurity.

    Research/practical implications: The contributions and concluding discussion aim at compiling the state of knowledge on job insecurity and its consequences, outlining directions for future research, and addressing practical implications on how to minimize job insecurity perceptions in organizations.

1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf