Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Danielsson, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Awad, Wael
    Saraboji, Kadhirvel
    Kurnik, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lang, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Leinartaité, Lina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Logan, Derek T.
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Global structural motions from the strain of a single hydrogen bond2013In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 110, no 10, p. 3829-3834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The origin and biological role of dynamic motions of folded enzymes is not yet fully understood. In this study, we examine the molecular determinants for the dynamic motions within the beta-barrel of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), which previously were implicated in allosteric regulation of protein maturation and also pathological misfolding in the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Relaxation-dispersion NMR, hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and crystallographic data show that the dynamic motions are induced by the buried H43 side chain, which connects the backbones of the Cu ligand H120 and T39 by a hydrogen-bond linkage through the hydrophobic core. The functional role of this highly conserved H120-H43-T39 linkage is to strain H120 into the correct geometry for Cu binding. Upon elimination of the strain by mutation H43F, the apo protein relaxes through hydrogen-bond swapping into a more stable structure and the dynamic motions freeze out completely. At the same time, the holo protein becomes energetically penalized because the twisting back of H120 into Cu-bound geometry leads to burial of an unmatched backbone carbonyl group. The question then is whether this coupling between metal binding and global structural motions in the SOD1 molecule is an adverse side effect of evolving viable Cu coordination or plays a key role in allosteric regulation of biological function, or both?

  • 2.
    Johansson, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Vestling, Monika
    Zetterström, Per
    Lang, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Leinartaitė, Lina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Karlström, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Cytotoxicity of superoxide dismutase 1 in cultured cells is linked to Zn2+ chelation2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 4, p. e36104-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurodegeneration in protein-misfolding disease is generally assigned to toxic function of small, soluble protein aggregates. Largely, these assignments are based on observations of cultured neural cells where the suspect protein material is titrated directly into the growth medium. In the present study, we use this approach to shed light on the cytotoxic action of the metalloenzyme Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), associated with misfolding and aggregation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The results show, somewhat unexpectedly, that the toxic species of SOD1 in this type of experimental setting is not an aggregate, as typically observed for proteins implicated in other neuro-degenerative diseases, but the folded and fully soluble apo protein. Moreover, we demonstrate that the toxic action of apoSOD1 relies on the protein's ability to chelate Zn(2+) ions from the growth medium. The decreased cell viability that accompanies this extraction is presumably based on disturbed Zn(2+) homeostasis. Consistently, mutations that cause global unfolding of the apoSOD1 molecule or otherwise reduce its Zn(2+) affinity abolish completely the cytotoxic response. So does the addition of surplus Zn(2+). Taken together, these observations point at a case where the toxic response of cultured cells might not be related to human pathology but stems from the intrinsic limitations of a simplified cell model. There are several ways proteins can kill cultured neural cells but all of these need not to be relevant for neurodegenerative disease.

  • 3.
    Leinartaité, Lina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Zinc in folding and misfolding of SOD1: Implications for ALS2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease causing degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. Most ALS cases are sporadic; only 6% are associated with mutations in Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). It is believed, however, that sporadic and familiar forms of ALS share a common mechanism, where SOD1 plays an important role: SOD1 knockout mice do not develop ALS, whereas the overexpression of human SOD1 in mice produces ALS-like symptoms. Increasing evidence suggest that the SOD1 structure gains cytotoxic properties, but detailed description of the toxic species is missing. This thesis work is focused on understanding how structural and dynamic properties of SOD1 change along its folding free-energy landscape and indicates the structural hot-spots from where the cytotoxic species may originate. Thus, binding of the zinc controls folding, stability and turnover of SOD1: (i) miscoordination of Zn2+ by the Cu-ligands speeds up folding of the SOD1 core structure, however, it stabilizes SOD1 in a state where both active-site loops IV and VII are unfolded, (ii) coordination of Zn2+ in the Zn-site, induces the folding of loop VII and stabilizes the native and  functional fold of both active-site loops and (iii) the tremendous stability gain due to Zn-site metallation corresponds to a folded state’s lifetime of  > 100 years, thus the cellular lifetime of SOD1 is likely controlled by Zn2+ release, which again is coupled to opening of active-site loops. Hence the active-site loops IV and VII stand out as critical and floppy parts of the SOD1 structure. Moreover, a number of ALS-associated mutations, benign to apo-SOD1 stability, are shown here to affect integrity of active-site loops in holo-SOD1, which, in turn, increases population of SOD1 species with these loops disorganized. Finally, the close relation between SOD1 and Zn2+ can also act in the reverse direction: a perturbed folding free-energy landscape of SOD1 can disturb Zn2+ homeostasis.

  • 4.
    Leinartaité, Lina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Johansson, Ann-Sofi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Disulfide Scrambling in Superoxide Dismutase 1 Reduces Its Cytotoxic Effect in Cultured Cells and Promotes Protein Aggregation2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 10, p. e78060-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations in the gene coding for superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are associated with familiar forms of the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These mutations are believed to result in a gain of toxic function, leading to neuronal degeneration. The exact mechanism is still unknown, but misfolding/aggregation events are generally acknowledged as important pathological events in this process. Recently, we observed that demetallated apoSOD1, with cysteine 6 and 111 substituted for alanine, is toxic to cultured neuroblastoma cells. This toxicity depended on an intact, high affinity Zn2+ site. It was therefor contradictory to discover that wild-type apoSOD1 was not toxic, despite of its high affinity for Zn2+. This inconsistency was hypothesized to originate from erroneous disulfide formation involving C6 and C111. Using high resolution non-reducing SDS-PAGE, we have in this study demonstrated that the inability of wild-type apoSOD1 to cause cell death stems from formation of non-native intramolecular disulfides. Moreover, monomeric apoSOD1 variants capable of such disulfide scrambling aggregated into ThT positive oligomers under physiological conditions without agitation. The oligomers were stabilized by intermolecular disulfides and morphologically resembled what has in other neurodegenerative diseases been termed protofibrils. Disulfide scrambling thus appears to be an important event for misfolding and aggregation of SOD1, but may also be significant for protein function involving cysteines, e. g. mitochondrial import and copper loading.

  • 5.
    Leinartaité, Lina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    ALS-provoking SOD1 mutations benign to the apo state compromise the protein’s ability to retain metalsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Leinartaité, Lina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Pamment, Ylva
    Kovachev, Petar
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Dynamics of the SOD1 functional loops – disorder and fluctuations of the apo state can both be triggered and prevented by metallationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Leinartaité, Lina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Saraboji, Kadhirvel
    Nordlund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Logan, Derek T.
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Folding catalysis by transient coordination of Zn2+ to the Cu ligands of the ALS-associated enzyme Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 12010In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 132, no 38, p. 13495-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How coordination of metal ions modulates protein structures is not only important for elucidating biological function but has also emerged as a key determinant in protein turnover and protein-misfolding diseases. In this study, we show that the coordination of Zn(2+) to the ALS-associated enzyme Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is directly controlled by the protein's folding pathway. Zn(2+) first catalyzes the folding reaction by coordinating transiently to the Cu ligands of SOD1, which are all contained within the folding nucleus. Then, after the global folding transition has commenced, the Zn(2+) ion transfers to the higher affinity Zn site, which structures only very late in the folding process. Here it remains dynamically coordinated with an off rate of ∼10(-5) s(-1). This relatively rapid equilibration of metals in and out of the SOD1 structure provides a simple explanation for how the exceptionally long lifetime, >100 years, of holoSOD1 is still compatible with cellular turnover: if a dissociated Zn(2+) ion is prevented from rebinding to the SOD1 structure then the lifetime of the protein is reduced to a just a few hours.

  • 8.
    Nordlund, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Leinartaité, Lina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Saraboji, Kadhirvel
    Aisenbrey, Christopher
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Zetterström, Per
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Logan, Derek T.
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Functional features cause misfolding of the ALS-provoking enzyme SOD12009In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 106, no 24, p. 9667-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structural integrity of the ubiquitous enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD1) relies critically on the correct coordination of Cu and Zn. Loss of these cofactors not only promotes SOD1 aggregation in vitro but also seems to be a key prerequisite for pathogenic misfolding in the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We examine here the consequences of Zn(2+) loss by selectively removing the Zn site, which has been implicated as the main modulator of SOD1 stability and disease competence. After Zn-site removal, the remaining Cu ligands can coordinate a nonnative Zn(2+) ion with microM affinity in the denatured state, and then retain this ion throughout the folding reaction. Without the restriction of a metallated Zn site, however, the Cu ligands fail to correctly coordinate the nonnative Zn(2+) ion: Trapping of a water molecule causes H48 to change rotamer and swing outwards. The misligation is sterically incompatible with the native structure. As a consequence, SOD1 unfolds locally and interacts with neighboring molecules in the crystal lattice. The findings point to a critical role for the native Zn site in controlling SOD1 misfolding, and show that even subtle changes of the metal-loading sequence can render the wild-type protein the same structural properties as ALS-provoking mutations. This frustrated character of the SOD1 molecule seems to arise from a compromise between optimization of functional and structural features.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf