Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Enoh, M.
    Ma, Lichen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Lindner, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Unified protocol vs. diagnostic specific treatment of social anxiety – a randomized treatment study with a factorial design2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ma, Lichen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Kruijt, Anne-Wil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Nöjd, S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Zetterlund, E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Andersson, G.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Attentional bias modification in virtual reality2019In: Book of Abstracts: 21st Conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology, 2019, p. 227-227, article id PS1.51Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Attentional bias modification (ABM) aims to reduce anxiety by attenuating bias towards threatening information. The current study incorporated virtual reality (VR) technology and 3-dimensional stimuli with a dot-probe task to evaluate the effects of a VR-based ABM training on attentional bias and anxiety symptoms. A total of 100 participants were randomised to four training groups. Attentional bias was assessed at pre- and post-training, and anxiety symptoms were assessed at pre-training, post-training, 1-week follow-up, and 3-months follow-up. Change in anxiety did not correlate with change in bias. No significant difference in bias was observed from pre- to post-ABM or between groups. For anxiety symptoms, participants showed significant reduction in anxiety scores over time. However, no other significant main effect or interactions were found. A clinically significant change analysis revealed that 9% of participants were classified as ‘recovered’ at 3-months follow-up.

  • 3.
    Ma, Lichen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Kruijt, Anne-Wil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Nöjd, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Zetterlund, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Attentional Bias Modification in Virtual Reality: A VR-Based Dot-Probe Task With 2D and 3D Stimuli2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 2526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Attentional bias modification (ABM) aims to reduce anxiety by attenuating bias toward threatening information. The current study incorporated virtual reality (VR) technology and three-dimensional stimuli with a dot-probe task to evaluate the effects of a VR-based ABM training on attentional bias and anxiety symptoms.

    Methods: A total of 100 participants were randomized to four training groups. Attentional bias was assessed at pre- and post-training, and anxiety symptoms were assessed at pre-training, post-training, 1-week follow-up, and 3-months follow-up.

    Results: Change in anxiety did not correlate with change in bias (p = 0.24). A repeated-measures ANOVA showed no significant difference in bias from pre- to post-ABM (p = 0.144), or between groups (p = 0.976). For anxiety symptoms, a linear mixed-effects model analysis revealed a significant effect of time. Participants showed reduction in anxiety score at each successive assessment (p < 0.001). However, no other significant main effect or interactions were found. A clinically significant change analysis revealed that 9% of participants were classified as ‘recovered’ at 3-months follow-up.

    Conclusion: A single session of VR-based ABM did not change attentional bias. The significant reduction in anxiety was not specific to active training, and the majority of participants remained clinically unchanged.

  • 4.
    Ma, Lichen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Zetterlund, Elin
    Nöjd, Sofia
    Ek, Anna-Karin
    Åbyhammar, Gustaf
    Kruijt, Anne-Wil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Attentional bias modification in virtual reality2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: It has been theorised that attentional biases (sensitivity and hypervigilance towards threat-related information) may play a causal role in the aetiology and maintenance of dysfunctional anxiety. Attentional bias modification (ABM) aims to directly modify the underlying attentional biases implicated in anxiety disorders, and consequently reduce anxiety symptoms.

    We conducted two studies that examined the effectiveness of ABM training programs in reducing attentional bias and anxiety. Both programs were delivered via virtual reality (VR) technology. Study 1 utilised a traditional dot-probe ABM, and Study 2 utilised a Person Identity Match (PIM) ABM. In addition to the comparison of two different ABM programs, the studies also investigated whether the use of 3 dimensional stimuli has an impact on the outcome of the ABM training.

    Methods:

    Study 1

    One hundred participants with elevated anxiety scores (LSAS > 30) were randomly assigned to 4 groups:

    1. ABM with 2D stimuli (n = 25)2. Mock-ABM with 2D stimuli (n = 25)3. ABM with 3D stimuli (n = 25)4. Mock-ABM with 3D stimuli (n = 25)

    The participants first completed questionnaires that measured their anxiety and other factors of interest. After which the participants completed 100 trials of a dot-probe task to measure their pre-training attentional bias. The participants then completed 360 trials of ABM training. Following ABM, the participants carried out post-training bias measurement and anxiety measurement. Finally, the participants answered follow-up questionnaires 1 week and 3months after the ABM training.

    Study 2

    Study 2 shares the exact same design as Study 1, but utilised a different version of ABMtraining.

    Results: Data analysis is currently ongoing and results are pending. The change in attentional bias and anxiety are the primary outcome measures. Both within-group comparisons (pre-training vs. post-training) and between-group comparisons (ABM vs. mock; 2D vs 3D; Dot-probe vs. PIM) will be carried out. Some preliminary results will be presented at the conference.

    Conclusions: Pending

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf