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  • 1. Björklund, Jenny
    et al.
    Hellstrand, Ingvil
    Folkmarson Käll, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Marking the Unmarked: Theorizing Intersectionality and Lived Embodiment through Mammoth and Antichrist2016In: Illdisciplined Gender: Engaging Questions of Nature/Culture and Transgressive Encounters / [ed] Jacob Bull, Margaretha Fahlgren, Springer, 2016, 99-113 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article confronts the notion of intersectionality with its conditions of materiality and embodiment. Understanding intersectionality as an overarching framework for analyzing power imbalances, we locate the body at the core of intersectionality as the site or situation where intersectional identities emerge and are made manifest. Our point of departure is that identities are always embodied, socially, culturally, spatially, and historically situated, and in continuous relational becoming. Considering the relevance of the body in intersectional structures of domination, our analysis aims to elaborate on the ways in which categories of identity are inscribed precisely as bodily markers and reinforced through embodiment.

    We discuss and develop the notion of intersectionality in light of lived embodiment. To facilitate our discussion, we use cultural representations, namely, the two contemporary films Mammoth by Lukas Moodysson (2009) and Antichrist by Lars von Trier (2009). The films serve as a particular lens through which intersections of power and dominance are brought to light as embodied, relational, and dynamic. By analyzing scenes from Mammoth and Antichrist, we highlight how intersectional identities are conditioned by and condition embodiment. Our analysis underlines how identity categorizations are inscribed on and in the body and how lived embodiment constitutes the very site in which seemingly stable identity categories intersect and have the potential of being both reproduced and transformed. This theoretical position not only brings to light bodies already marked by intersecting strands of oppression and marginalization but also makes visible the intersectional embodiment of privileged and seemingly unmarked bodies—it marks the unmarked.

  • 2. Bodin, Maja
    et al.
    Stern, Jenny
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    Centre for Gender Research, Humanistiskt centrum, Uppsala, Sweden; Centre for Dementia Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Larsson, Margareta
    Coherence of pregnancy planning within couples expecting a child2015In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 31, no 10, 973-978 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Folkmarson Käll, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Bodies, Boundaries and Vulnerabilities: Interrogating Social, Cultural and Political Aspects of Embodiment2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Folkmarson Käll, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Ellen Feder's Making Sense of Intersex and the Issue of Sexual Difference2016In: Philosophy today (Celina), ISSN 0031-8256, E-ISSN 2329-8596, Vol. 60, no 3, 799-807 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Folkmarson Käll, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Performativity and Expression: The Case of David Cronenberg’s M. Butterfly2016In: Bodies, Boundaries and Vulnerabilities: Interrogating Social, Cultural and Political Aspects of Embodiment / [ed] Lisa Folkmarson Käll, Springer, 2016, 153-174 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through a reading of David Cronenberg’s 1993 film M. Butterfly, this chapter brings Judith Butler’s idea of the performativity of gender into conversation with Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s writings on the expression of embodied subjectivity. The chapter brings out how the portrayal of the two protagonists in Cronenberg’s film, Song Liling and René Gallimard, on the one hand illustrates Butler’s contention that gender identity is performatively constituted through a stylized reiteration of bodily acts that produce the illusion of an inner core on the surface of the body and on the other hand points to the limitations of a strictly performative framework. The character of Song Liling is portrayed in such a way as to also provoke questions of how to account for subjectivity or a felt sense of self that cannot be captured by third-person descriptions nor reduced to a product of reiterated performative imitation. Challenging Butler’s simplistic account and dismissal of expression, the chapter turns instead to the account of expression offered by Merleau-Ponty and argues that this provides a non-reductive way of understanding subjectivity as embodying both a first- and a third-person perspective in interrelation and of rethinking the relation between interiority and exteriority without reducing one to the other.

  • 6.
    Folkmarson Käll, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Vulnerable Bodies and Embodied Boundaries2016In: Bodies, Boundaries and Vulnerabilities: Interrogating Social, Cultural and Political Aspects of Embodiment / [ed] Lisa Folkmarson Käll, Springer, 2016, 1-12 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A body, and especially a body considered as a whole, is a mass distinct from other masses. It occupies space, and as a geometric figure, it is three-dimensional having length, breadth, and thickness. Its dimensions and its weight can be measured. To be a body is thus to have boundaries, to be singularized and exclusive of other bodies. However, this view of the body is clearly not as simple and straightforward as it sounds. Even though a body is a mass distinct from other bodies, it nevertheless receives its distinct dimensions and forms only in relation to those other bodies from which it is distinguished. Bodies are thus in their very singularity and exclusivity intimately interrelated with one another. The boundaries distinguishing one body from another are also what constitute their connection. Bodies are interconnected both insofar as they share one another’s distinctive lines of demarcation and insofar as the shared boundaries between them make them parts of one whole. Thus, bodies are exclusive of one another only by virtue of their mutual inclusion within each other’s boundaries and in the world. Further, even though the dimensions and borders of a body can be measured, they are by no means fixed and unchangeable; rather, bodies continuously materialize in new ways as their boundaries are drawn and redrawn, reinforced, transgressed, and altered.

  • 7.
    Käll Folkmarson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies. Linköpings universitet.
    "She's Research!": Exposure, Epistemophilia and Ethical Perception in Mike Nichols' Wit2014In: Feminist Phenomenology and Medicine / [ed] Kristin Zeiler & Lisa Folkmarson Käll, SUNY Press, 2014, 241-262 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Käll, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Intercorporeality and the Constitution of Body Schemata: A Case of Pain2014In: Pain without Boundaries: Inquires across Cultures / [ed] Roy F. Fox, Nicole M. Monteiro, Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2014, 51-61 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    A Path between Voluntarism and Determinism: Tracing Elements of Phenomenology in Judith Butler’s Account of Performativity2015In: Lambda Nordica: Tidskrift om homosexualitet, ISSN 1100-2573, Vol. 20, no 2-3, 23-48 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    A Voice of Her Own? Echo’s Own Echo2015In: Continental philosophy review, ISSN 1387-2842, E-ISSN 1573-1103, Vol. 48, no 1, 59-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article approaches Ovid’s story of Echo and Narcissus in the Metamorphoses through some of Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s writings on expression and speech. Echo’s speech as portrayed by Ovid clearly illustrates how Merleau-Ponty describes speech in Phenomenology of Perception as a ‘‘paradoxical operation’’ through which we use words with already given sense and in that very process both stabilize and alter established meaning. Instead of reducing Echo to a moment of the identity and fate of Narcissus, I bring out Echo’s own voice and the expression of her subjectivity through creative repetition. The short dialogue between Echo and Narcissus makes manifest that Echo’s words cannot be reduced to a simple repetition of a clear and distinct original. Rather, her speech emerges in relation to an original that is only made present as an original of a repetition in that very repetition. Echo’s voice is disruption of the words she repeats and each repetition is also its own origin. Echo’s own voice is only made present when we listen to it as something other than a simple repetition of the voice of Narcissus. The fragments she returns through her echo, lose their fragmented character through modifying and altering their already given meaning. What Echo lacks is not primarily a voice of her own but rather an unbound origin which by itself remains mute and thereby runs the risk of not expressing anything at all. Echo is repetition but it is precisely as repetition that she is also originating speech.

  • 11.
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    Linköpings university; Uppsala university.
    Dimensions of pain: humanities and social science perspectives2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Intercorporeal Relations and Ethical Perception: Portrayals of Alzheimer’s Disease in Away from Her and En sång för Martin2015In: Popularizing Dementia: Public Expressions and Representations of Forgetfulness / [ed] Aagje Swinnen & Mark Schweda, Bielefeld: Transkript Verlag , 2015, 253-274 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    Linköpings university; Uppsala university.
    Intercorporeality and the Sharability of Pain2013In: Dimensions of Pain: Humanities and Social Science Perspectives / [ed] Lisa Folkmarson Käll, London: Routledge, 2013, 27-40 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    Linköpings universitet; Uppsala universitet.
    Introduction: Dimensions of Pain2013In: Dimensions of Pain: Humanities and Social Science Perspectives / [ed] Lisa Folkmarson Käll, London: Routledge, 2013, 1-12 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies. Linköpings universitet.
    Närhetens intima avstånd: Om känselsinnet som sammanbindande och gränsdragande2013In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 4, 25-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary The sense of touch is often both conceptualized and experienced in terms of closeness in contrast to an objectifying distance traditionally ascribed to the sense of sight. In this article I thematize the closeness of touch and examine the relation between touching and touched through a close reading of Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy of the lived body and its relation to the world and others. The purpose of such a reading is to throw light on the closeness characterizing the sense of touch as a closeness involving its own distance or gap through which touch and the relation between touching and touched are given birth. Merleau-Ponty offers sophisticated and fruitful tools for approaching established concepts and understandings of sensation and touch, bodily boundaries, and closeness and distance. In a first step, I reflect on the multiple and ambiguous meanings of the words sense (känna) and touch (beröra), emphasizing the impossibility of understanding these words in any simple terms. In a second step, I turn to MerleauPonty’s philosophy in order to reach a deeper understanding of the closeness of touch. I discuss his description of the lived body as sensible sentient, that is as both touching and touchable, his understanding of the notion intercorporeity and his description of the relation between touching and touched in terms of an incomplete reversibility that both binds the two terms together while at the same time drawing a boundary between them.

  • 16.
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Reflections on the Ambiguities of Being Post: Traces of Phenomenology in Judith Butler's 'Poststructuralist' Performativity2014In: Tidsskrift for kjønnsforskning, ISSN 0809-6341, E-ISSN 1891-1781, Vol. 38, no 3-4, 332-338 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies. Centrum för demensforskning (CEDER) Linköpings unversitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Subjektivitet, kropp och medvetande2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström & Lars-Christer Hydén, Stockholm: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 41-47 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Feminist phenomenology and medicine2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies. Linköpings universitet.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköpings universitet.
    Why Feminist Phenomenology and Medicine?2014In: Feminist Phenomenology and Medicine / [ed] Kristin Zeiler & Lisa Folkmarson Käll, SUNY Press, 2014, 1-25 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Käll, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies. Linköpings universitet.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköpings universitet.
    Bodily Relational Autonomy2014In: Journal of consciousness studies, ISSN 1355-8250, Vol. 21, no 9-10, 100-120 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conceptions of autonomy in western philosophy and ethics have often centred on self-governance and self-determination. However, a growing bulk of literature also questions such conceptions, including the understanding of the autonomous self as a self-governing independent individual that chooses, acts, and lives in accordance with her or his own values, norms, or sense of self. This article contributes to the critical interrogation of selfhood, autonomy, and autonomous decision making by combining a feminist focus on relational dimensions of selfhood and autonomy with phenomenological philosophy of the embodied self as being-in-the-world. It offers a philosophical investigation of different dimensions of bodily relational autonomy by turning to phenomenological accounts of the lived body as self-reflexive. When so doing, we hope to contribute to bridging the gap that sometimes exists between discussions of autonomy in analytic moral philosophy and of freedom and facticity in phenomenological philosophy. We see this gap as unfortunate, and hold that a nuanced understanding of autonomy and autonomous decision making can be reached if these strands of philosophy are brought into dialogue.

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