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  • 1. Berggren, Niclas
    et al.
    Jordahl, Henrik
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The Political Opinions of Swedish Social Scientists2009In: Finnish economic papers, ISSN 0784-5197, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 75-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the political opinions of Swedish social scientists in seven disciplines and find indications of a left‑right divide, with sociology and gender studies being the most left‑leaning disciplines, with business administration, economics, and law being the most right‑leaning ones, and with political science and economic history being located somewhere in between. This pattern is found when lookingat party preferences, left‑right self‑identification, and positions on economic policy issues. Overall, there is a slight dominance in sympathies for the right, although there are more academics to the left among those most involved in activities with a potential to influence decision‑makers.

  • 2.
    Bihagen, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nermo, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Class Origin and Elite Position of Men in Business Firms in Sweden, 1993-2007: The Importance of Education, Cognitive Ability, and Personality2013In: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 939-954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Swedish registry data, we study the impact of class origin on becoming part of the business elite between 1993 and 2007 for men aged 35–44 years. The elite is defined as the top 1 per cent of wage earners within large firms. We find a clear working class disadvantage and, with time, a polarization between those of working class origin and others. Decomposition analyses indicate that differences in educational attainment levels cause a large part of the gap, but less so over time. Differences in personality traits measured at around the age of 18 years also help explain the class origin differentials, and more so over time. The decomposition analyses indicate that the net effect of cognitive abilities is small. The results suggest a change in the value of education and personality in the labour market over time, but as men of working class origins have disadvantages in both domains, the relative disadvantage of coming from the working class was rather stable during the period 1993–2007.

  • 3.
    Bihagen, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nermo, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Kvinnor och män i topplönepositioner i svenska privata företag, 1993-20072014In: Yrke, karriär och lön: kvinnors och mäns olika villkor på den svenska arbetsmarknaden, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2014, p. 135-163Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bihagen, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nermo, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The gender gap in the business elite: stability and change in characteristics of Swedish top wage earners in large private companies, 1993-20072014In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 119-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using unique Swedish register data on all employees in large private companies, we study trends in the gender composition of top wage employees from 1993 to 2007. The analyses reveal that the likelihood of women holding top wage positions has more than doubled since the early 1990s, but men are still markedly over-represented in this group of employees. We focus on educational choices, considering level and field of study as well as university attended. One important conclusion is that, although education is important in reaching a top wage position, field of education and university attended only marginally explain the gender  gap. However, relative to other women, having a career signalling degree (i.e. economics, law or engineering) from a more prestigious university helps women. Dividing the sample into different cohorts indicates that the gender gap is partly a cohort effect, i.e. it is smaller among those born in the 1960s compared to cohorts born in the 1940s and 1950s. It should be noted that there is still a gender gap among employees born in the 1960s and that the gap widens after age 30. Future studies should focus more deeply on this family-related ‘period of divergence’.

  • 5.
    Bihagen, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nermo, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Vem rekryteras till eliten? Betydelsen av familjeband och kompetens i privat och offentlig sektor2018In: Eliter i Sverige: Tvärvetenskapliga perspektiv på makt, status och klass / [ed] Bengt Eriksson, Mikael Holmqvist, Lena Sohl, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 217-246Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bihagen, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nermo, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Åberg, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Elite mobility among college graduated men in Sweden: Skills, personality and family ties2017In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 291-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Swedish registry data, we study the chances of mobility into the Swedish labour market elite for men who graduated in the years 1985-2005. The elite is defined as top earners within mid- and large sized firms and within the public sector organisations (henceforth, we use organisation for both firms and public organisations). Using discrete time event history models, we study the incidence of elite entry in terms of external recruitment and internal promotion. The choice of field of study and of college or university are important, as are personality and, to a limited extent, cognitive ability. What is most striking is that having kin in elite positions increases the chance of elite entry in general, and having parents in top positions in the same organisation increases the likelihood of internal promotion. In sum, elite entry among college-educated males is associated with a diversity of factors, suggesting that complex explanations for labour market success should be considered, where skills, personality, and family ties all seem to matter.

  • 7. Crawford, Jarret T.
    et al.
    Duarte, Jose L.
    Haidt, Jonathan
    Jussim, Lee
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tetlock, Philip E.
    It may be harder than we thought, but political diversity will (still) improve social psychological science2015In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, ISSN 0140-525X, E-ISSN 1469-1825, Vol. 38, article id e164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our target article, we made four claims: (1) Social psychology is now politically homogeneous; (2) this homogeneity sometimes harms the science; (3) increasing political diversity would reduce this damage; and (4) some portion of the homogeneity is due to a hostile climate and outright discrimination against non-liberals. In this response, we review these claims in light of the arguments made by a diverse group of commentators. We were surprised to find near-universal agreement with our first two claims, and we note that few challenged our fourth claim. Most of the disagreements came in response to our claim that increasing political diversity would be beneficial. We agree with our critics that increasing political diversity may be harder than we had thought, but we explain why we still believe that it is possible and desirable to do so. We conclude with a revised list of 12 recommendations for improving political diversity in social psychology, as well as in other areas of the academy.

  • 8. Duarte, Jose L.
    et al.
    Crawford, Jarret T.
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Haidt, Jonathan
    Jussim, Lee
    Tetlock, Philip E.
    Political diversity will improve social psychological science2015In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, ISSN 0140-525X, E-ISSN 1469-1825, Vol. 38, article id e130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychologists have demonstrated the value of diversity - particularly diversity of viewpoints - for enhancing creativity, discovery, and problem solving. But one key type of viewpoint diversity is lacking in academic psychology in general and social psychology in particular: political diversity. This article reviews the available evidence and finds support for four claims: (1) Academic psychology once had considerable political diversity, but has lost nearly all of it in the last 50 years. (2) This lack of political diversity can undermine the validity of social psychological science via mechanisms such as the embedding of liberal values into research questions and methods, steering researchers away from important but politically unpalatable research topics, and producing conclusions that mischaracterize liberals and conservatives alike. (3) Increased political diversity would improve social psychological science by reducing the impact of bias mechanisms such as confirmation bias, and by empowering dissenting minorities to improve the quality of the majority's thinking. (4) The underrepresentation of non-liberals in social psychology is most likely due to a combination of self-selection, hostile climate, and discrimination. We close with recommendations for increasing political diversity in social psychology.

  • 9. Klein, Daniel B.
    et al.
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    By the numbers: the ideological profile of professors2009In: The politically correct university: problems, scope, and reforms / [ed] Robert Maranto, Richard E. Redding, Frederick M. Hess, Washington: AEI Press , 2009, p. 15-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10. Klein, Daniel B.
    et al.
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Groupthink in academia: majoritarian departmental politics and the professional pyramid2009In: The politically correct university: problems, scope, and reforms / [ed] Robert Maranto, Richard E. Redding, Frederick M. Hess, Washington: AEI Press , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11. Klein, Daniel B.
    et al.
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Groupthink in Academia: Majoritarian Departmental Politics and the Professional Pyramid2009In: The Independent Review: a journal of political economy, ISSN 1086-1653, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 585-600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although academia differs from the settings explored by groupthink theorists, it exhibits many of the same tendencies and failings. One result is the relative absence of classical-liberal and conservative viewpoints among humanities and social sciences professors, especially in the more elite departments.

  • 12.
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Undoing Insularity: A Small Study of Gender Sociology's Big Problem2016In: Econ Journal Watch, ISSN 1933-527X, E-ISSN 1933-527X, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 452-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In my experience as a sociologist, I see many ways in which gender sociology tends to insulate itself from challenges to its own sacred beliefs and sacred causes. The sacred beliefs are to the effect that the biological differences between the sexes are minor and that the cultural differences between the genders have little basis in biological differences. The scholarly findings that challenge the sacred beliefs come from anthropology, developmental psychology, evolutionary psychology, the neurosciences, genetics, biology, and many other fields. For many decades now researchers have amassed findings of differences in competitiveness, aggression, sexual interest, risk behavior, and many other traits, and differences in brain physiology and neuroimaging, by many different methods and approaches. I investigated a sample of top cited gender sociology papers to test my impression, and indeed the findings illustrate extreme insularity. It saddens me to see students and scholars fall into insular communities of highly dubious sacred beliefs and causes. I propose that gender sociologists strive to undo insularity.

1 - 12 of 12
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