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  • 1.
    F. Renner, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Wlodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    When a Dog is a Cat and How it Changes Your Pupil Size: Pupil Dilation in Response to Information Mismatch2017In: Proceedings of Interspeech 2017 / [ed] Francisco Lacerda, David House, Mattias Heldner, Joakim Gustafson, Sofia Strömbergsson, Marcin Włodarczak, 2017, p. 674-678Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we investigate pupil dilation as a measure of lexical retrieval. We captured pupil size changes in reaction to a match or a mismatch between a picture and an auditorily presented word in 120 trials presented to ten native speakers of Swedish. In each trial a picture was displayed for six seconds, and 2.5 seconds into the trial the word was played through loudspeakers. The picture and the word were matching in half of the trials, and all stimuli were common high-frequency monosyllabic Swedish words. The difference in pupil diameter trajectories across the two conditions was analyzed with Functional Data Analysis. In line with the expectations, the results indicate greater dilation in the mismatch condition starting from around 800 ms after the stimulus onset. Given that similar processes were observed in brain imaging studies, pupil dilation measurements seem to provide an appropriate tool to reveal lexical retrieval. The results suggest that pupillometry could be a viable alternative to existing methods in the field of speech and language processing, for instance across different ages and clinical groups.

  • 2.
    Forssén Renner, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Wlodarzcak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    The surprised pupil: New perspectives in semantic processing research2016In: ISSBD 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the research on semantic processing and brain activity, the N400-paradigm has been long known to reflect a reaction to unexpected events, for instance the incongruence between visual and verbal information when subjects are presented with a picture and a mismatching word. In the present study, we investigate whether an N400-like reaction to unexpected events can be captured with pupillometry. While earlier research has firmly established a connection between changes in pupil diameter and arousal, the findings have not been so far extended to the domain of semantic processing. Consequently, we measured pupil size change in reaction to a match or a mismatch between a picture and an auditorily presented word. We presented 120 trials to ten native speakers of Swedish. In each trial a picture was displayed for six seconds, and 2.5 seconds into the trial the word was played through loudspeakers. The picture and the word were matching in half of the trials, and all stimuli were common high-frequency monosyllabic Swedish words. For the analysis, the baseline pupil size at the sound playback onset was compared against the maximum pupil size in the following time window of 3.5 seconds. The results show a statistically significant difference (t(746)=-2.8, p < 0.01) between the conditions. In line with the hypothesis, the pupil was observed to dilate more in the incongruent condition (on average by 0.03 mm). While the results are preliminary, they suggest that pupillometry could be a viable alternative to existing methods in the field of language processing, for instance across different ages and clinical groups. In the future, we intend to validate the results on a larger sample of participants as well as expand the analysis with a view to locating temporal regions of greatest differences between the conditions. In the future, we intend to validate the results on a larger sample of participants as well as expand the analysis with a functional analysis accounting for temporal changes in the data. This will allow locating temporal regions of greatest differences between the conditions.

  • 3.
    Gardin, Emily
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Wikstedt, Emilia
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Markelius, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Renner, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Consonant inventory of Swedish speaking 24-month-olds: A cross-sectional study2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014: Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 123-126Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This cross-sectional study examines the consonant inventory of Swedish speaking twenty-four-month olds. The results are compared with English speaking children at the same age. 15 audio files recorded from 13 children were transcribed using independent analysis. Individual inventories where constructed for both word-initial and word-final consonants for each subject. The results are to a high degree consistent with the findings in the study compared. Anterior consonants are more frequent in the subject’s inventories than posterior ones in both initial and final word position. Word initial voiced plosives are more common in the inventories than voiceless with the reverse situation i.e. voiceless plosives are more frequent than voiced in word final position.

  • 4. Kauschke, Christina
    et al.
    Renner, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Domahs, Ulrike
    Morpho-phonological constraints affect Germanplural and particple formation in children with SLI2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Kauschke, Christina
    et al.
    Renner, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Domahs, Ulrike
    Prosodic constraints on inflected words: An area of difficulty for German-speaking children with specific language impairment?2013In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 574-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies suggest that morphosyntactic difficulties may result from prosodic problems. We therefore address the interface between inflectional morphology and prosody in typically developing children (TD) and children with SLI by testing whether these groups are sensitive to prosodic constraints that guide plural formation in German. A plural elicitation task was designed consisting of 60 words and 20 pseudowords. The performance of 14 German-speaking children with SLI (mean age 7.5) was compared to age-matched controls and to younger children matched for productive vocabulary. TD children performed significantly better than children with SLI. Error analyses revealed that children with SLI produced more forms that did not meet the optimal shape of a noun plural. Beyond the fact that children with SLI have deficits in plural marking, the findings suggest that they also show reduced sensitivity to prosodic requirements. In other words, the prosodic structure of inflected words seems to be vulnerable in children with SLI.

  • 6. Kauschke, Christina
    et al.
    Renner, Lena F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Domahs, Ulrike
    Past participle formation in specific language impairment2017In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 168-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: German participles are formed by a co-occurrence of prefixation and suffixation. While the acquisition of regular and irregular suffixation has been investigated exhaustively, it is still unclear how German children master the prosodically determined prefixation rule (prefix ge-). Findings reported in the literature are inconsistent on this point. In particular, it is unclear whether participle formation is vulnerable in German children with specific language impairment (SLI).

    Aims: To compare children with and without SLI in their abilities to form German participles correctly, and to determine their relative sensitivities to the morphophonological regularities of prefixation.

    Methods & Procedures: The performance of 14 German-speaking children with SLI (mean age = 7;5) in a participle formation task was compared with that of age-matched and younger typically developing controls. The materials included 60 regular verbs and 20 pseudo-verbs, half of them requiring the prefix ge-.

    Outcome & Results: Overall, children with SLI performed poorly compared with both groups of typically developing children. Children with SLI tended either to avoid participle markings or choose inappropriate affixes. However, while such children showed marked impairment at the morphological level, they were generally successful in applying the morphoprosodic rules governing prefixation.

    Conclusions & Implications: In contrast to earlier findings, the present results demonstrate that regular participle formation is problematic for German children with SLI.

  • 7.
    Renner, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sambandet mellan fonologi och lexikon i den tidiga språkutvecklingen2013In: Dyslexi, ISSN 1401-2480, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Renner, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    The role of production in perception of mispronounced words2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    First language acquisition could be investigated from two different domains: perception and production. Earlier perceptual studies showed different reactions to correct word forms compared to mispronounced ones, indicating that lexical representations of early word forms are stored in detail (e.g. White & Morgan 2008, Swingley 2003). However, these perceptual experiments do not take the individual production of the child into account. My research project involves different studies on perception and production. At the Norphlex-­‐seminar in Tromsø I will present the results of an eye-­‐tracking study on the perception of mispronounced words and I hope to be able to present some results on the ongoing study of production.

  • 9.
    Renner, Lena F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    The magic of matching – speech production and perception in language acquisition2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates the relationship between speech production and speech perception in the early stages of phonological and lexical acquisition. Previous studies have mainly focused on independent investigations of speech production and perception abilities in language acquisition. This thesis connects the individual speech production capacities to the child's perception and is organized around three major studies: Study I explores methodological alternatives such as the combination of EEG and eye-tracking in different Swedish participant groups: adults, 17-month-olds, and 24-month-olds. Visual and auditory stimuli, as well as the connection between word production and word perception are explored. Study II investigates phonological capacities in terms of consonant inventory, percentage of correctly pronounced words, segmental errors, as well as phonological templates in relation to vocabulary size in a group of Swedish 18-month-olds. Study III studies the influence of the children's individual phonological and lexical capacities in speech production on their word recognition in a group of Swedish toddlers with a productive vocabulary size above 100 words.

    The general results show that children accept mispronounced word forms as appropriate word candidates when the word forms are related to their individual word production. The occurrence of segmental errors increases with vocabulary size, and phonological templates are more likely to be observed in children with a productive vocabulary size above 100 words. The results thus indicate an influence of the individual child's production on word recognition, and a relationship between phonological capacities and lexical knowledge. These insights contribute to theoretical debates in linguistics regarding the abstractness of phonological word form representations and reveal a closer relationship between production and perceptual abilities in toddlers than what has previously been shown.

  • 10.
    Renner, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Markelius, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Brain responses to typical mispronunciations among toddlers2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In first language acquisition research, investigations on the semantics and lexicon of the child are often conducted by measuring brain activity at the surface of the scalp (EEG). Such EEG studies have shown different brain reactions to matching and mismatching pairs of pictures and words from 19-month-olds (Friedrich & Friederici, 2005). Similarly, results from 20-month-olds exposed to auditory stimuli only indicated different brain reactions to correct pronunciations and mispronunciations (Mills et al., 2004). However, these studies do not take the typical production patterns in that specific age into account.

    In the present study, we measured brain reactions of 13 24-month-olds exposed to pairs of pictures and words in four different conditions: correctly pronounced words, two different kinds of mispronounced words, and novel words. The first type of mispronunciations (M1) consisted in minor mispronunciations consistent with typical production patterns in first language acquisition, e.g. ‘ko’ instead of ‘sko’ (shoe). The second type (M2) was characterized by phonological changes that are not expected at 24 months, e.g. ‘fo’ instead of ‘sko’ (shoe). The novel words consisted of phonotactically possible Swedish non-words.

    A principal component analysis (PCA) decomposition of the EEG data showed two patterns of posterior negativity typical of lexical-semantic processing: one for novel words in comparison to the other conditions, and the other for novel and M2 word forms compared to M1 and correct word forms. These results indicate that M1 are processed similar as correct word forms, and that M2 and novel words are processed alike. However, while these patterns were visually salient in successive components, the results were not statistically significant. We suspect that the non-significant results were due to the small dataset. Nevertheless, this study contributes to the discussion on the relationship between perception and production in first language acquisition.

  • 11.
    Renner, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Markelius, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Productional abilities can affect the perception of mispronounced words: An eye-tracking study with Swedish two-year-old children2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Renner, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Combining EEG signals and Eye-tracking data to investigate the relationship between phonological and lexical acquisition2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Renner, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Strandberg, Andrea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Phonological templates in Swedish 18-month-old children in relation to vocabulary size2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between phonology and lexicon in first language acquisition has been of interest for many researchers in the last years (for a review see  [1]). Both perception and production studies have been conducted to investigate each of these areas. Among the speech production studies, phonological templates have been proposed as an account of how children acquire words. Phonological templates are child-specific word form patterns such as consonant harmony, which children frequently use. In projecting the phonological template onto adult word forms the child adapts new words to fit to his or her own preferred production pattern [2].

    In the present study, we investigate phonological templates in spontaneous speech from 12 Swedish 18-month-old children. The phonological templates are also related to each child’s vocabulary size, based on  the Swedish version of the McArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory (CDI) [3]. The participants included four children with a vocabulary size above 100 words, three with a vocabulary size between 50 and 100 words and five children with a vocabulary size below 50 words. The tentative findings indicate that only those children with a vocabulary size above 100 words show phonological templates, pointing to a relationship between lexical and phonological development in speech production. The results are discussed in relation to the existence of phonological templates in general and to the increased probability of the occurrence of phonological templates in a specific window of vocabulary size.

     

1 - 13 of 13
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