Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Björck, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Regulation of proton-coupled electron transfer in cytochrome c oxidase: The role of membrane potential, proton pathways and ATP2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) is the final electron acceptor of the respiratory chain. In this chain a current of electrons, derived from degradation of nutrients, along with protons, are used to reduce oxygen to water. The reaction is exergonic and the excess energy is used to pump protons across the membrane. This proton-coupled electron transfer is regulated, for example, by the membrane potential, the composition of the membrane and the ATP/ADP concentrations. 

    Here, we have investigated the mechanism of this regulation. Specifically, we investigated ligand binding to CytcO in mitochondria, which provides mechanistic information about CytcO in its native environment. In addition to CytcO, a water soluble protein, flavohemoglobin (yHb) was found to bind CO and we found that it is localized in the intermembrane space (IMS). We also extracted CytcO from mitochondria without detergent using the styrene maleic acid (SMA) co-polymer. We could show that the SMA-extracted CytcO behaved similarly in its reaction with O2 and CO as CytcO in mitochondria.

    In mitochondria and bacterial membranes CytcO transports charges against a transmembrane electrochemical gradient. We induced a membrane potential across sub-mitochondrial particles (SMPs) by addition of ATP and measured single CytcO turnover. Our results indicate that proton transfer, but not electron transfer, across the membrane is affected by the membrane potential.

    In yeast CytcO subunit Cox13 has been shown to play a role in ATP/ADP binding to regulate activity. We have solved the structure of Cox13 using NMR and identified the residues that constitute the ATP-binding site, which is located at the C-terminus.

    Finally we showed that the main proton-transfer pathways in yeast CytcO function similarly to their bacterial counterparts and that the proposed H-pathway, absent in bacteria, is not responsible for proton translocation in mitochondrial CytcO from S. cerevisiae.

  • 2.
    Björck, Markus L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brzezinski, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Control of transmembrane charge transfer in cytochrome c oxidase by the membrane potential2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 3187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The respiratory chain in mitochondria is composed of membrane-bound proteins that couple electron transfer to proton translocation across the inner membrane. These charge-transfer reactions are regulated by the proton electrochemical gradient that is generated and maintained by the transmembrane charge transfer. Here, we investigate this feedback mechanism in cytochrome c oxidase in intact inner mitochondrial membranes upon generation of an electrochemical potential by hydrolysis of ATP. The data indicate that a reaction step that involves proton uptake to the catalytic site and presumably proton translocation is impaired by the potential, but electron transfer is not affected. These results define the order of electron and proton-transfer reactions and suggest that the proton pump is regulated by the transmembrane electrochemical gradient through control of internal proton transfer rather than by control of electron transfer.

  • 3.
    Björck, Markus L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Vilhjálmsdóttir, Jóhanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hartley, Andrew M.
    Meunier, Brigitte
    Näsvik Öjemyr, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Marechal, Amandine
    Brzezinski, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Proton-transfer pathways in the mitochondrial S. cerevisiae cytochrome c oxidase2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 20207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) reduction of O-2 to water is linked to uptake of eight protons from the negative side of the membrane: four are substrate protons used to form water and four are pumped across the membrane. In bacterial oxidases, the substrate protons are taken up through the K and the D proton pathways, while the pumped protons are transferred through the D pathway. On the basis of studies with CytcO isolated from bovine heart mitochondria, it was suggested that in mitochondrial CytcOs the pumped protons are transferred though a third proton pathway, the H pathway, rather than through the D pathway. Here, we studied these reactions in S. cerevisiae CytcO, which serves as a model of the mammalian counterpart. We analyzed the effect of mutations in the D (Asn99Asp and Ile67Asn) and H pathways (Ser382Ala and Ser458Ala) and investigated the kinetics of electron and proton transfer during the reaction of the reduced CytcO with O-2. No effects were observed with the H pathway variants while in the D pathway variants the functional effects were similar to those observed with the R. sphaeroides CytcO. The data indicate that the S. cerevisiae CytcO uses the D pathway for proton uptake and presumably also for proton pumping.

  • 4.
    Björck, Markus L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Vilhjálmsdóttir, Jóhanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hartley, Andrew M.
    Meunier, Brigitte
    Näsvik Öjemyr, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Maréchal, Amandine
    Brzezinski, Peter
    Proton-transfer pathways in the mitochondrial S. cerevisiae cytochrome c oxidaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) reduction of O2 to water is linked to uptake of eight protons from the negative side of the membrane: four are substrate protons used to form water and four are pumped across the membrane. In bacterial oxidases, the substrate protons are taken up through the K and the D proton pathways, while the pumped protons are transferred through the D pathway. On the basis of studies with CytcO isolated from bovine heart mitochondria, it was suggested that in mitochondrial CytcOs the pumped protons are transferred though a third proton pathway, the H pathway, rather than throughthe D pathway. Here, we studied these reactions in S. cerevisiae CytcO, which serves as a model of the mammalian counterpart. We analyzed the effect of mutations in the D(Asn99Asp and Ile67Asn) and H pathways (Ser382Ala and Ser458Ala) and investigated the kinetics of electron and proton transfer during the reaction of the reduced CytcO withO2. No effects were observed with the H pathway variants while in the D pathway variants the functional effects were similar to those observed with the R. sphaeroides CytcO. The data indicate that the S. cerevisiae CytcO uses the D pathway for proton uptake and pumping.

  • 5.
    Björck, Markus L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Zhou, Shu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Rydström Lundin, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ott, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ädelroth, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brzezinski, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Reaction of S-cerevisiae mitochondria with ligands: Kinetics of CO and O-2 binding to flavohemoglobin and cytochrome c oxidase2017In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1858, no 2, p. 182-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kinetic methods used to investigate electron and proton transfer within cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) are often based on the use of light to dissociate small ligands, such as CO, thereby initiating the reaction. Studies of intact mitochondria using these methods require identification of proteins that may bind CO and determination of the ligand-binding kinetics. In the present study we have investigated the kinetics of CO-ligand binding to S. cerevisiae mitochondria and cellular extracts. The data indicate that CO binds to two proteins, CytcO and a (yeast) flavohemoglobin (yHb). The latter has been shown previously to reside in both the cell cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix. Here, we found that yHb resides also in the intermembrane space and binds CO in its reduced state. As observed previously, we found that the yHb population in the mitochondrial matrix binds CO, but only after removal of the inner membrane. The mitochondrial yHb (in both the intermembrane space and the matrix) recombines with CO with T congruent to 270 ms, which is significantly slower than observed with the cytosolic yHb (main component T congruent to 1.3 ms). The data indicate that the yHb populations in the different cell compartments differ in structure.

  • 6.
    Smirnova, Irina A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Moscow State University, Russian Federation.
    Sjöstrand, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Li, Fei
    Björck, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Schäfer, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Östbye, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stanford University, United States.
    von Ballmoos, Christoph
    Lander, Gabriel C.
    Ädelroth, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brzezinski, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Isolation of yeast complex IV in native lipid nanodiscs2016In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes, ISSN 0005-2736, E-ISSN 1879-2642, Vol. 1858, no 12, p. 2984-2992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used the amphipathic styrene maleic acid (SMA) co-polymer to extract cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) in its native lipid environment from S. cerevisiae mitochondria. Native nanodiscs containing one CytcO per disc were purified using affinity chromatography. The longest cross-sections of the native nanodiscs were 11 nm x 14 nm. Based on this size we estimated that each CytcO was surrounded by similar to 100 phospholipids. The native nanodiscs contained the same major phospholipids as those found in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Even though CytcO forms a supercomplex with cytochrome bc(1) in the mitochondria! membrane, cyt.bc(1) was not found in the native nanodiscs. Yet, the loosely-bound Respiratory SuperComplex factors were found to associate with the isolated CytcO. The native nanodiscs displayed an O-2-reduction activity of similar to 130 electrons CytcO(-1) s(-1) and the kinetics of the reaction of the fully reduced CytcO with 02 was essentially the same as that observed with CytcO in mitochondrial membranes. The kinetics of CO-ligand binding to the CytcO catalytic site was similar in the native nanodiscs and the mitochondrial membranes. We also found that excess SMA reversibly inhibited the catalytic activity of the mitochondrial CytcO, presumably by interfering with cyt. c binding. These data point to the importance of removing excess SMA after extraction of the membrane protein. Taken together, our data shows the high potential of using SMA-extracted CytcO for functional and structural studies.

  • 7.
    Suhm, Tamara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Dawitz, Hannah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Peselj, Carlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Masser, Anna E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hanzén, Sarah
    Ambrožič, Matevž
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Smialowska, Agata
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Björck, Markus L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brzezinski, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Nyström, Thomas
    Büttner, Sabrina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. University of Graz, Austria.
    Andréasson, Claes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Ott, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mitochondrial Translation Efficiency Controls Cytoplasmic Protein Homeostasis2018In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, E-ISSN 1932-7420, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1309-1322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellular proteostasis ismaintained via the coordinated synthesis, maintenance, and breakdown of proteins in the cytosol and organelles. While biogenesis of the mitochondrial membrane complexes that execute oxidative phosphorylation depends on cytoplasmic translation, it is unknown how translation within mitochondria impacts cytoplasmic proteostasis and nuclear gene expression. Here we have analyzed the effects of mutations in the highly conserved accuracy center of the yeast mitoribosome. Decreased accuracy of mitochondrial translation shortened chronological lifespan, impaired management of cytosolic protein aggregates, and elicited a general transcriptional stress response. In striking contrast, increased accuracy extended lifespan, improved cytosolic aggregate clearance, and suppressed a normally stress-induced, Msn2/4-dependent interor-ganellar proteostasis transcription program (IPTP) that regulates genes important for mitochondrial proteostasis. Collectively, the data demonstrate that cytosolic protein homeostasis and nuclear stress signaling are controlled by mitochondrial translation efficiency in an inter-connected organelle quality control network that determines cellular lifespan.

  • 8.
    Zhou, Shu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Pettersson, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Björck, Markus L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Dawitz, Hannah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brzezinski, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mäler, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ädelroth, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    NMR structural analysis of yeast Cox13 reveals its C-terminus in interaction with ATPManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The organization of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes into supercomplexes is vital to cellular activities. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cox13 is a conserved peripheral subunit of complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase, CytcO) involved in the assembly of monomeric complex IV into supercomplexes. Here we report the solution NMR structure of a Cox13 dimer in detergent micelles. Each Cox13 monomer has three short flexible helices (SH), corresponding to the disordered regions in its homologous X-ray structure, and the dimer formation is mainly induced by the hydrophobic interaction between the sole transmembrane (TM) helix of each monomer. Furthermore, analysis of chemical shift changes upon addition of ATP reveal positions that are able to bind ATP at the conserved sites of the C-terminus with considerable conformational flexibility. From functional analysis of purified CytcO, we conclude that this ATP interaction is inhibitory of catalytic activity. Our results show the structure of an important subunit of yeast CytcO and provide structure-based insight into its ATP interaction.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf