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  • 1.
    Karlsson, Weine
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Malaki, AkhilStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    48th International Congress of Americanists (ICA): Growth, Trade and Integration in Latin America1996Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Malaki, Akhil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History. Institute of Latin American Studies.
    Development Patterns in teh Commonwealth Caribbean: Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago1996Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The process of national development is dynamic and multifaceted; an interrelationship between political sociology and the economy. The purpose of this study is to provide an explanation to the present day economic and social crises in Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago which is located in 'dependent capitalist development'. It explores whether the dynamics of the crises is internal or external. In providing an explanation the study merely recasts Cardoso and Faletto's approach emphasizing the historical-structural transformations that have given rise to conflicts, social movements and political processes. Of critical importance has been the 'internalization of external interests'. The conclusion drawn is that the dynamics of the phenomenon of dependent capitalist development is both internatl and external. The study also shows that the crises are not just economic but more so social and cultural where internalization has occurred. The mechanism that brings about a delicate balance between centripetal and centrifugal forces withing this kind of a development is clientelism while the sources of this patronage system are, to a large extent, externally located. The interaction of all these factors has constantly resisted attempts at structural transformation. Instead, they have only served to perpetuate dependent capitalist development in Jamaica and Trindiad & Tobago.

  • 3.
    Malaki, Akhil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Historical Roots of Exploitation Structures in the Caribbean1995In: IBEROAMERICANA: Nordic Journal of Latin American Studies: Revista Nordica de Estudios Latinoamericanos, ISSN 0046-8444, Vol. XXV, no 1-2, 45-72 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Malaki, Akhil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Jamaica's Struggle with Debt and Structural Adjustment1996In: Scandinavian Journal of Development Alternatives and Area Studies, ISSN 0280-2791, Vol. 15, no 3 & 4, 135-164 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Jamaica has been a 'good debtor' and has serviced its debt most faithfully. This is only one side of the story. The other darker side is that, while being a good debtor, Jamaica's total debt to GDP has steadily risen, as well as its debt to multilateral lenders. This is Jamaica's dilemma today. The country has borrowed from 'Peter to pay Paul'. Most of its foreign exchange earnings has gone towards serviced debt, leaving little for the much needed investment in the domestic economy. The paper shows that Jamaica's economic problems are both a consequence of internal and external factors. The paper also points out that while Jamaica has the capabilities of emerging out of debt crisis, it has been constrained by external factors. The only way out for the country is for creditors, both multilateral and bilateral, to ease the burden on Jamaica through debt relief.

1 - 4 of 4
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