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  • 1.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Altering conditions for student participation and motive development in school science: learning from Helena’s mistake2012In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 425-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on science education has described various factors influencing students’ participation and produced categorizations of students based on e.g. cultural background. In this article it is argued, theoretically and empirically, that an understanding of students’ participation in science education needs to begin with an analysis of what activity students are engaged in. The aim is to explore how altering conditions of classroom work may open up opportunities for students mainly participating in an activity of education or schooling to engage in an activity of science learning. Activity is conceptualized in a Cultural-Historical Activity Theory perspective as object-oriented and transformative. Drawing on an ethnographic study in a Swedish compulsory school, a critical incident of the participation in science education of a 7th grade girl called Helena is analyzed. The results show that altered conditions of classroom practice may produce new possibilities for student participation, and point to the impossibility of determining students as ‘different kinds of students’ based on a priori categories e.g. sex, ethnicity, socio-economic background.

  • 2.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Biotechnology education as social and cultural production/reproduction of the biotechnology community2014In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a commentary to a paper by Anne Solli, Frank Bach and Björn Åkerman on how students at a technical university learn to argue as biotechnologists. Solli and her colleagues report from an ethnographic study performed during the first semester of a 5-year program in biotechnology at a technical university in Sweden. Their study demonstrates how students begin to acquire ‘the right way’ of approaching the controversial issue of producing and consuming genetically modified organisms. In my response I discuss the ethnographic account of this particular educational practice in terms of social and cultural production/reproduction of a biotechnology community and how the participants (students and teaching professors) deal with the dialectic of individual and collective transformation. In the perspective of the biotechnology community, the work done by the teaching professor becomes a way of ensuring the future of the biotechnology community in terms of what values and objectives are held highly in the community of practice.

  • 3.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Bodily formation of students in the school science laboratory2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work in the school science laboratory has been criticized for being pseudo-experimental, resulting only in a reproduction of already well-known facts and theories. The point of departure in this paper is rather what students actually have the possibility to learn. What we learn must be understood as an aspect of the activities we engage in. In this article the formation of students in the school science laboratory is analyzed within a cultural historical tradition. The research approach is ethnographic. Two science classes, grade six and seven, were studied in a Swedish midsized compulsory school during one school-year. A conclusion is that both students’ laboratory skills and their abilities to discern, classify, and represent nature and the physical reality is developed.

  • 4.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Borders/Border Crossing2015In: Encyclopedia of Science Education / [ed] Richard Gunstone, Springer Netherlands, 2015, p. 132-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Border crossing provides a lens for analyzing science learning as cultural acquisition and science teaching as cultural transmission. Thus, science is deemed as culture rather than absolute truth. The generic construction of border crossing assumes the existence of borders between two (or more) distinguishable cultures/subcultures that, to a varying degree, represent obstacles for individuals to cross. The notion of border crossing has been used widely in science education research to conceptualize difficulties that students encounter in science education. In research, science classroom experiences of students and teachers have been theorized in terms of the ease with which students and teachers cross cultural borders of the science classroom. Border crossings have been categorized as smooth, manageable, hazardous, or virtually impossible (Cobern & Aikenhead, 1998). The concept of border crossing was borrowed from cultural anthropology and first applied to Western students studying science by Aikenhead (1996) with an expressed aim to encourage science educators to acknowledge inherent border crossings between students’ lifeworld subcultures and the subculture of science. The theoretical framework of cultural borders and border crossing have later been challenged for assuming subcultures as given entities and not fully taking hybridity, heterogeneity, and the situatedness of cultural practices into account (Carter, 2008).

  • 5.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Developing Inquiry Literacy: Exploring Conditions for Students’ Learning about Inquiry in Primary School from a CHAT Perspective2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    There is a current debate in science education on what it might mean to educate scientifically literate citizens and the possibilities of actually educating students to become “competent outsiders with respect to science” (Feinstein, 2011). One aspect of scientific literacy, which has been underscored but not sufficiently scrutinized in relation to educating “competent outsiders”, concerns the issue of becoming capable “…to evaluate the quality of scientific information on the basis of its source and the methods used to generate it”. (National Science Education Standards, 1996, p. 22). The aim of this study is to explore conditions for promoting students' abilities to engage in critical discussion in relation to science inquiry in primary science education.

    In science education, on a policy level, inquiry has been attributed great promise as an instructional approach. It has been identified as a ‘key-approach’ to primary science education (Harlen, 2009; Lena, 2009), and recommended as the 'renewed pedagogy for the future of Europe' (European commission, 2007). Today, inquiry is found in curricula world-wide (Beeth et al., 2003). As educational practices, IBSE practices are inherently hybrid: products, ideas and methods of science are transformed into educational content and classroom tasks (Andrée, 2007). The aims of inquiry based science education (IBSE) are, multi-facetted involving IBSE as a method for a) making science more interesting, b) illustrating scientific concepts and c) learning about inquiry as a way of doing science. From previous studies of inquiry and practical work in science education at various levels, we know that students' work in classrooms/school laboratories cannot be equated with the work of scientists even when students follow what appears to be similar procedure (e.g. Wickman & Östman, 2002). Studies specifically focusing on learning about inquiry show that an explicit focus on teaching about the characteristics of scientific inquiry is unusual (Lager-Nyqvist, 2003; Gyllenpalm, 2010). Also, teachers do not regard learning about inquiry as equally important as traditional science subject matter (Lederman, 2007). In addition to this, teachers have rarely experienced authentic inquiry themselves (Windshitl, 2002).

    Developing an inquiry literacy involves appropriation of a particular social language for critically analysing, evaluating and judging scientific investigations and conclusions (cf. Lemke, 1993). A challenge in a Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) perspective (cf. Engeström, 2001; Leontiev, 1986; Roth, Lee & Hsu, 2009) becomes to engage students in an activity that allows them to make use of relevant intellectual tools for discussing scientific investigations. This also relates to the issue of authenticity and how to create some resemblance between what students do in school science and what happens in science laboratories (Roth, Eijck, Reis & Hsu, 2008).

    Method

    The study was conducted as a participant-oriented action research study in collaboration with two teachers teaching science in primary school, grades 1-2 and 3, in one Swedish compulsory school over one school-year. This implies studying educational practice with a view to improving the quality of action within it (cf. Elliot, 1991). Data was collected throughout the school-year by using audio- and video recordings of collaborative teacher-researcher meetings, classroom work and collecting artifacts (e.g. work-plans, lesson plans, and student work). Data also include field-notes from informal meetings. Data is analyzed in terms of how students’ incorporate a language of inquiry in activity. The analytical framework used is Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (cf. Engeström, 2001; Leontiev, 1986; Roth, Lee & Hsu, 2009) in combination with Bakhtin’s (1986) notion of speech genres.

    Expected Outcomes

    The initial experiences of collaborating researchers and teachers was that it is difficult to design teaching practices that allow students to engage in open-ended inquiry sharing some resemblance to what happens in science laboratories in terms of the levels of control the students have over their conditions of work. For example, when grade 1 students were given a task to collect and investigate mosses in a nearby forest, the teacher by habit assembled the collected mosses from the students without record of whom had collected what mosses, in view that the class would share the mosses equally the following science lesson. As a consequence, the students were deprived of their own unique collection and lost the context for gathering their mosses. In the next step of inquiry students could not relate to the different milieus of the mosses. In order to push toward more authentic inquiry, researchers and teachers have discussed how to further control over inquiry to the students without loosing the objective of developing students abilities to talk about inquiry work. Further detailed analyses will focus on how students in grades 2 and 3 incorporate a language of inquiry when investigating water phase transitions.

    References

    Bakhtin, M. (1986). The problem of speech genres. In C. Emerson & M. Holquist (Eds.), Speech genres and other late essays (pp. 60-102). Austin: Univ. of Texas Press.

    Elliot, J. (1991). Action Research for Educational Change. Open University Press, Bristol.

    Engeström, Y. (2001). Expansive learning at work: toward an activity theoretical reconceptualization. Journal of Education and Work, 14(1), 133-156.

    European commission (2007). Science Education Now: A Renewed Pedagogy for the Future of Europe. Expert Group Community Research Report. Directorate-General for Research Information and Communication Unit. Brussels.

    Feinstein, N. (2011), Salvaging science literacy. Science Education, 95, 168–185.

    Gyllenpalm, J., Wickman, P-O. & Holmgren, S-O. (2009). Teachers’ Language on Scientific Inquiry: Methods of teaching or methods of inquiry? International Journal of Science Education, 32, 1151-1172.

    Harlen, W. (2009). Evaluation of inquiry-based science education pedagogy and programs. Presentation at European Conference on Primary science education Berlin, May 29 2009.

    Lederman, N. (2007). Nature of science: Past, Present and Future. In N. Lederman & S. Abel (Eds.), Handbook of research on science education (pp. 831-879). Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum.

    Lemke, J. (1993). Talking science: Language, learning, and values. Norwood: Ablex.

    Lena, P. (2009). A long term model for IBSE in primary schools Lessons from La main à la pâte in France. Presentation at European Conference on Primary Science Education Berlin, May 29.

    Leontiev, A. (1986). Verksamhet, medvetande personlighet. Moskva/Göteborg: Progress/Fram.

    Roth, W-M., Eijck,M. Reis, G. & Hsu, P-L. (2008). Authentic science revisited: In praise of diversity, heterogeneity, hybridity. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.

    Roth, W-M., Lee, Y.J. & Hsu, P-L. (2009). Cultural-historical activity theory and science education. Studies in Science Education, 45, 131-167.

    Windschitl, M., Thompson, J. & Braaten, M. (2008). Beyond the scientific method: Model-based inquiry as a new paradigm of preference for school science investigations. Science Education, 92, 941-967.

  • 6.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Formation of students’ investigative expertise in the school science laboratory – a study of practical work in lower secondary school2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work in the school science laboratory has been criticized for being pseudo-experimental, resulting only in a reproduction of already well-known facts and theories. The point of departure in this paper is rather what students actually have the possibility to learn. What we learn must be understood as an aspect of the activities we engage in. In this article the formation of students in the school science laboratory is analyzed within a cultural historical tradition. The research approach is ethnographic. Two science classes, grade six and seven, were studied in a Swedish midsized compulsory school during one school-year. A conclusion is that both students’ laboratory skills and their abilities to discern, classify, and represent nature and the physical reality is developed.

  • 7.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Levda läroplaner i individorganiserad NO-undervisning2010In: Uppdrag undervisning: - kunskap och lärande / [ed] Inger Eriksson, Viveca Lindberg, Eva Österlind, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2010, p. 97-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Motsträviga medverkande och orädda genier: Om elevers deltagande och delaktighet i grundskolans NO-undervisning2007In: Locus, ISSN 1100-3197, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 4-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Ny forskning om naturvetenskapens och teknikens didaktik2007In: LMNT-nytt, ISSN 1402-0041, no 2, p. 26-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Några nya avhandlingar2009In: LMNT-nytt, ISSN 1402-0041, no 1, p. 34-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Recension: Elftström, Nilsson, Sterner & Wehner-Godée: Barn och naturvetenskap - upptäcka, utforska, lära2008In: LMNT-nytt, ISSN 1402-0041, no 2, p. 42-42Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Student participation and motive development in school science: The case of Helena’s mistaken acid.2010In: Socio-cultural and Human Values in Science and Technology Education / [ed] Slavko Dolinšek, Ljubljana: IRI UL, Institute for Innovation and Development of University of Ljubljana , 2010, p. 94-101Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on science education has described various factors influencing students' participation and produced categorizations of students based on e.g. cultural background. In this article it is argued, theoretically and empirically, that an understanding of students‘ participation in science education needs to begin with an analysis of what activity students are engaged in. The aim is to shed light on student participation in science classroom practice and how altered conditions of classroom practice can make additional space for developing motives for learning science. Activity is conceptualized in a cultural-historical activity theoretical perspective as what transformation of objects students are engaged in. Drawing on an ethnographic study in a Swedish compulsory school, a critical incident of the participation in science education of a 7th grade girl called Helena is analyzed. The results show that altered conditions of classroom practice may produce new possibilities for student participation, and point to the impossibility of determining students as different kinds of students based on a priori categories.

  • 13.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Vardagsanknytning som pedagogiskt redskap2012In: Skola och naturvetenskap: - politik, praktik, problematik i belysning av ämnesdidaktisk forskning / [ed] Helge Strömdahl & Lena Tibell, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, p. 95-111Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Ways of using "everyday-life" in the science classroom2005In: Research and the quality of science education / [ed] Kerst Boersma..., Dordrecht: Springer , 2005, p. 107-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Connecting science to students’ everyday-life experiences is an important theme in science education discourse. The aim of this article is to explore in what ways ‘everyday-life’ is used in the science classroom and what problems are solved through the use of ‘everyday-life’. The research approach is ethnographic. Data was gathered through participant observation during one semester in two Swedish science classes. Results show that ‘everyday-life’ is brought into the classroom and made into school tasks within different types of activities; enculturation into science, education of scientifically literate citizens and making science interesting. The results underscore the importance of understanding the use of ‘everyday-life’ in science classrooms as embedded in science classroom practice.

  • 15.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Borgström, LenaStockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education.Hammarström-Lewenhagen, BirgittaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    En klass för sig: Om forskning och forskarutbildning vid Lärarhögskolan i Stockholm2007Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En klass för sig handlar om forskning och forskarutbildning vid Lärarhögskolan i Stockholm under 50 år. Syftet är att synliggöra den forskarutbildning som formellt lyder under samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten vid Stockholms universitet men som självständigt bedrivits vid "den första och sista lärarhögskolan" mellan åren 1956 och 2007. Forskningens och forskarutbildningens bredd illustreras av en bibliografi över de 170 avhandlingar som producerats vid Lärarhögskolan. I antologin beskriver forskare framväxten av ett utbildningsvetenskapligt forskningsfält. Ett uttryck för forskningsfältets utveckling som särskilt behandlas är inrättandet av nya utbildningsvetenskapliga forskarutbildningsämnen, utöver pedagogik handlar det om didaktik, specialpedagogik och barn- och ungdomsvetenskap. Antologin innehåller också nuvarande doktoranders och nyblivna doktorers berättelser om vägen till forskarutbildning och livet som doktorand på Lärarhögskolan. Avslutningsvis innehåller boken några korta avsnitt om de fora för spridning av forskningsresultat som funnits vid Lärarhögskolan. Boken vänder sig till lärare och forskare med intresse för den utbildningsvetenskapliga forskningens framväxt i allmänhet och den utbildningsvetenskapliga forskningens framväxt vid Lärarhögskolan i Stockholm i synnerhet. Redaktörerna och författarna är - eller har varit - verksamma inom forskning och forskarutbildning vid Lärarhögskolan i Stockholm.

  • 16.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hansson, Lena
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Fler ungdomar till naturvetenskapliga utbildningar? Om rekryteringsförsök, kunskapsemfaser och identitet.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Satsningar för att öka ungdomars intresse för naturvetenskap och naturvetenskapliga utbild-ningar görs av aktörer, med olika agenda och ekonomiska resurser. Aktuell forskning visar att ungdomars val av utbildning också är en fråga om identitet. Frågan är därför i vilken utsträck-ning olika rekryteringsförsök faktiskt öppnar för att naturvetenskap kan få plats i fler ung-domars identitetsskapande jämfört med idag. Syftet i artikeln är att, utifrån ett identitets-perspektiv, problematisera satsningar för att öka ungdomars intresse för naturvetenskapliga utbildningar. I artikeln analyseras exempel på två svenska rekryteringsförsök. Gemensamt för rekryteringsförsöken är att de innehåller filmer som riktar sig till elever i grundskolans senare del. Det första initiativet är

    Kemi-Julkalendern – en webbkalender (ett filmat experiment/dag), producerad och publicerad av Lunds Tekniska högskola. Initiativet är ett exempel på hur vetenskapssamhället självt försöker öka ungdomars intresse för naturvetenskaplig utbildning. Det andra initiativet är en kampanj från Teknikdelegationen. Delegationen är tillsatt av regeringen och kampanjen är ett exempel på ett politiskt initiativ som också engagerat industrirepresentanter. Kampanjen, som består av nio filmer, har syftet att få fler ungdomar att välja gymnasiets naturvetenskapliga program. Filmerna analyseras med utgångspunkt i Roberts kunskapsemfaser (Roberts, 1982; Roberts, 1998). Kunskapsemfaserna har tidigare använts vid läromedelsanalyser och läroplansanalyser. Här använder vi emfaserna för att analysera de budskap, om varför naturvetenskaplig kunskap/utbildning kan vara eftersträvansvärd, som förekommer i filmerna. I analysen identifieras både dominerande emfaser och emfaser som saknas. Dessa diskuteras i relation till elevers identitet, intresse och val. De preliminära resultaten visar att kemikalendern, genom filmernas "setting" och kommunicerade kunskaps-emfaser, bekräftar en stereotyp bild av naturvetare. Den dominerande emfasen är "Kunna för-klara själv". I filmerna visar en kemistudent hur han, tack vare kemikunskaper, kan manipulera och behärska föremål så att ovanliga och konstiga saker händer – primärt i syfte att ha roligt. Genom filmerna bjuds tittaren in och får tillgång till en del av den speciella kunskap kemisten besitter. I Teknikdelegationens filmer dominerar em-fasen "Den säkra grunden". Denna kommuniceras bl.a. genom att kända personer, som inte arbetar med natur-vetenskap, berättar att Nv-programmet ger en bred bas för fortsatta studier, en god grund för framtida arbete och tillträde till åtråvärda gemenskaper. Budskap om varför kunskap i och om naturvetenskap skulle kunna vara intressant eller användbart saknas, däremot nämns mate-matik och problemlösningsförmåga. Några säger också explicit att deras val av naturvetenskapsprogrammet inte handlade om ett intresse för naturvetenskap i sig. Istället uttrycks i filmerna intressen som fotboll, politik, teknik, musik och djur. Det ena av de två rekryterings-försöken bekräftar i stort en stereotyp bild av naturvetare, medan det andra undviker stereo-typen. Båda initiativen saknar t.ex. emfasen Naturvetenskap och beslutsfattande vilken kunde haft potential att attrahera ungdomar som vill göra något av skillnad för samhället. Inget av initiativen erbjuder sätt att förhålla sig till naturvetenskap som utgår från ett sådant intresse.

    För att öppna upp för att fler ungdomar ska kunna se sig själva välja naturvetenskaplig utbildning bör rekryteringsförsök ta utgångspunkt i hur människor, utifrån olika utgångspunkter och positioner i samhället finner kunskap i och om naturvetenskap meningsfull.

  • 17.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hansson, Lena
    Marketing the ‘Broad Line’: Invitations to STEM education in a Swedish recruitment campaign2013In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 147-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many Western societies, there is a concern about the tendency of young people not choosing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education and occupations. In response, different initiatives have been launched. If one believes that science should have a place in more young people's lives, an important question is to what extent recruitment campaigns communicate messages that open up for STEM education to become relevant in young people's identity formation. Here, we analyse a Swedish government-initiated, primarily Internet-based recruitment attempt (‘The Broad Line Campaign’) aimed at increasing the number of young people choosing the natural science programme in upper secondary school. The campaign is based on marketing principles and deliberately draws on identity issues. The data analysed consists of campaign films and written resources describing the campaign. Data are analysed by use of the constant comparative approach in order to produce categories describing different messages about why to engage in STEM education. These messages are then analysed from an identity perspective using the concept of subjective values. Our results show that the messages communicated in the Broad Line campaign emphasise utility value, attainment value and relative cost rather than interest-enjoyment. The campaign communicates that the natural science programme is to be associated with a high attainment value without establishing relations to the field of science. Finally, potential consequences of the communicated messages in the campaign are discussed in light of previous research.

  • 18.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hansson, Lena
    Problematizing industrial engagement in STEM-initiatives2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many different actors, including government, academy and industry, are engaged in school- and recruitment-STEM-initiatives. The aim of this article is to shed light on industrial initiatives, what actors are involved and what different repertoires are being used when industrial actors describe the initiatives and their engagement in them. The data collected consists of web-materials where industrial actors describe their engagement in STEM-initiatives and provide reasons for their engagement. The method for analysis is discursive psychology. The results show that a variety of constellations of industrial actors are engaged in STEM-initiatives and that the initiatives draw on a variety of discursive resources, e.g. competition resources, ‘fun’ teaching resources, role-model resources, industrial owned upper secondary schools, and industrial visits for school classes. In our analysis we identify the following interpretative repertoires which are used when the industrial actors describe the reasons for their engagement in the initiatives: 1) The securing competent labor repertoire, 2) The bright future for the world repertoire, 3) The Securing economic growth for the country or region (e.g. in competition with others) repertoire, 4) The increasing knowledge of the importance of science repertoire, 5) The general increase interest in science repertoire, and 6) The increasing knowledge in science repertoire. The use of these repertoires, and the fact that they work in relation to schools/teachers, are in the article discussed with a starting point in a combination of two prevailing discourses in the society – the “STEM-crisis”-discourse and the “Science as a savior” discourse.

  • 19.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hansson, Lena
    Högskolan i Kristianstad.
    Recruiting the next generation scientists and industrial engineers: How industrial actors engage in and motivate engagement in STEM initiative.2015In: Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 1877-0428, E-ISSN 1877-0428, Vol. 167, p. 75-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many different actors, including government, academy and industry, are engaged in school- and recruitment-STEM-initiatives. The aim is to shed light on industrial initiatives, what actors are involved and what different repertoires are being used when motivating engagement in STEM-initiatives. The data collected consists of web-materials where industrial actors describe their engagement in STEM-initiatives and provide reasons for their engagement. The method for analysis is discursive psychology. The results show that a variety of constellations of industrial actors are engaged in STEM-initiatives and that the initiatives draw on a variety of discursive resources. In our analysis we identify the following interpretative repertoires: 1) The securing competent labor repertoire, 2) The developing specific job skills or competences repertoire, 3) The bright future repertoire, and 4) The general increase interest in science repertoire. The results of this study may contribute to the self-reflection of industrial actors on how the choice of resources and repertoires may afford and constrain possibilities for breaking the cultural patterns of selection to STEM education.

  • 20.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hansson, Lena
    Recruitment Campaigns as a Tool for Social and Cultural Reproduction of Scientific Communities: A case study on how scientists invite young people to science2014In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 1985-2008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young people's interest in pursuing science and science-intense educations has been expressed as a concern in relation to societal, economic and democratic development by various stakeholders (governments, industry and university). From the perspective of the scientific communities, the issues at stake do not necessarily correspond to the overall societal aims. Rather, initiatives to recruit young people to science are also ways for the scientific community to engage in the social and cultural reproduction of itself. For a community to survive and produce a future, it needs to secure regeneration of itself in succeeding generations. The aim of this study is to, from a perspective of social and cultural production/reproduction, shed light on an initiative from the scientific community to recruit young people to science education. This is a case study of one recruitment campaign called the Chemistry Advent calendar. The calendar consists of 25 webcasted films, produced and published by the science/technology faculty at a university. The analysed data consist of the films and additional published material relating to the campaign such as working reports and articles published about the campaign. The analysis focussed on what messages are communicated to potential newcomers. The messages were categorised by means of a framework of subjective values. The results are discussed both from a perspective of how the messages mirror traditions and habits of the scientific community, and in relation to research on students' educational choices.

  • 21.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hansson, Lena
    Ideland, Malin
    Political Rationalities in Science Education: A Case Study of Teaching Materials Provided by External Actors2018In: Cultural, Social, and Political Perspectives in Science Education: A Nordic View / [ed] Kathrin Otrel-Cass, Martin Krabbe Sillasen, Auli Arvola Orlander, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2018, p. 75-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many Western societies have a tendency to talk about how schools are failing in the science subjects. School science is often discussed as outdated, not interesting enough for young people and non-effective for the students’ learning. This discourse opens up for external actors such as industrial actors and NGOs to engage in the teaching of science. One example of this is when these actors provide teaching materials. Thus, “statework”, in terms of educational governance, becomes distributed within public and private networks. One example which is analysed in this chapter can be found with the web-based calculators from the environmental organisation, WWF, and the energy company, E.ON; both are used for calculating ecological footprints. The aim is to analyse what political rationalities are invited into classrooms through these ecological footprint calculators and by what means. Our analysis targets how a specific kind of citizen is “made up” through a “centre of calculations”, and what political ideology influences the making of a sustainable citizen. This is achieved through looking into how the desirable citizen is governed through the technologies of accounting, debt and ethics. Through the accuracy of numbers and the bookkeeping of debt, the calculators produce a specific ethical approach. As a result, they suggest that becoming a responsible person is achieved through individual consumption choices rather than taking the issues to the political level. This distributed statework opens up for neoliberal economic and ideological interests to enter the classroom. We claim that it is of the utmost importance that teachers and educational policy-makers be made aware of the governing elements behind the teaching materials provided by external actors.

  • 22.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lager Nyqvist, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Students' Ways of Using Prior Experience in Inquiry Based Science Education – the case of NTA2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inquiry has been identified as a 'key-approach' and recommended as an important pedagogy to improve primary science education in Europe. Inquiry is also a key component in the US national science education standards. In Sweden, inquiry pedagogy in primary science has been introduced through a large curriculum program called NTA (Science and Technology for all). The aim of this paper is to shed light on what inquiry based science education (IBSE) practices are emerging in Swedish primary schools through the introduction of the NTA-program and what activities students are engaging in, in these practices. In particular we focus on ways of working with 'what is already known' which is held to be a central aspect to IBSE in e.g. the definition of inquiry in the US national science education standards. The research questions investigated are: In what actions do students engage in when working with ‘what is already known’ in IBSE practice? How is 'what is already known' acted with in practice? Data was collected, during a 10-week-period using video- and audiotape recordings of classroom work, in two 6th grade classes where teachers and students worked with an NTA-unit called 'the Chemistry of food'. Our analysis is conceptualized within a cultural-historical activity-theoretical perspective. Results show that students participate in three different actions: A) separation of tasks, B) playing the lottery and C) challenging test results with ‘what is already known’. These different actions involve different types of use of 'what is already known' , and the actions correspond to, and acquire meaning in relation to, different goals. Common to the different ways of working is that we can discern two different types of ‘what is already known’: (1) referring to facts, and (2) making use of ideas about science culture.

  • 23.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lager-Nyqvist, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Spontaneous Play and Imagination in Everyday Science Classroom Practice2013In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 1735-1750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In science education, students sometimes create and engage in spontaneous science-oriented play where ideas about science and scientists are put to use. However, in previous research, little attention has been given to the role of informal spontaneous play in school science classrooms. We argue that, in order to enhance our understanding of learning processes in school science practices, research that investigates play as an aspect of everyday culture is needed. The aim of this paper is to explore students’ informal play as part of activity in lower secondary school science. The empirical study was conducted in two Swedish compulsory schools in grade 6. Data were collected throughout a teaching unit called ‘The Chemistry of Food’ during a 10-week period using video and audiotape recordings of classroom work. Our analyses show that the play students engage in involves the transformations of given tasks. We find that students’ spontaneous collective play offers opportunities for them to explore the epistemic values and norms of science and different ways of positioning in relation to science. Our findings contribute to the understanding of how learning in the school science classroom is socially and culturally–historically embedded and how individual students’ engagement through play may transform and transcend existing classroom practices.

  • 24.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lager-Nyqvist, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Vad vi vet om fett – en studie av att ta elevers erfarenheter som utgångs-punkt för NO-undervisning.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Idén att bygga på elevers tidigare erfarenheter och kunskaper har varit betydelsefulla i det som benämnts ‟konstruktivistisk undervisning‟ i naturvetenskapliga ämnen. Ett råd till lärare har varit att ta elevers tidigare erfarenheter och kunskaper som utgångspunkt för undervis-ningen. Dessa idéer är framträdande i svenska NO-läromedel och upplägg för praktiskt under-sökande arbetssätt (t.ex. NTA). Syftet med detta paper är att problematisera hur elever använ-der ‟vad de redan vet‟ i praktiskt undersökande arbete i NO-undervisnings-praktiken. Inne-börder av att ta utgångspunkt i elevers tidigare efterenheter eller vad de vet om något är inte okomplicerat. Tidigare studier pekar på att det för olika skolämnen utvecklats olika skoläm-nespraktiker. Användning av det som ibland kallas vardagserfarenheter blir begripligt utifrån den specifika skolämnespraktiken snarare än utifrån en vardagskontext. Tidigare forskning om användning av vardag och tidigare erfarenheter i skolan har dock inte fokuserat på vad elever gör när de gör bruk av egna erfarenheter och kunskaper i praktiskt undersökande arbete och i vilken utsträckning bruk av egna erfarenheter bidrar till elevers lärande i linje med det avsedda undervisningsinnehållet i praktiskt undersökande arbete. Vi redovisar här en studie av hur elever arbetar med ‟vad de vet om fett‟ inom ramen för arbete med uppdraget "Matens kemi" i NTA-programmet. NTA (

    Naturvetenskap och teknik för alla) är ett program för prak-tiskt undersökande arbete med naturvetenskap och teknik i grundskolans tidigare år. I arbetet med matens kemi inleds varje avsnitt med att eleverna ska diskutera ‟vad de vet om‟ olika näringsämnen och därefter undersöka i vilka olika sorters livsmedel som detta näringsämne finns. I det avsnitt som handlar om fett undersöker eleverna om det finns fett i t.ex. mjölk, vatten, äpple, mjöl o.s.v. Studien bygger på analys av transkriberade ljud- och video-inspel-ningar av 12 elevgrupper i två klasser, på vardera skolan, som arbetar med lektionen om fett i uppdraget "Matens kemi". Det empiriska materialet analyseras i ett verksamhets-teoretiskt perspektiv. Resultaten visar att eleverna gör bruk av ‟vad de vet om fett‟ på olika sätt, som del av olika verksamheter. Vi urskiljer tre verksamheter som svarar mot olika ledande motiv: ut-bildning, naturvetenskaplig enkulturering och sociala relationer. Med de exempel vi lyfter fram i analysen visar vi att hur och vilka tidigare erfarenheter elever använder i arbetet med fett inte bara handlar om vilka erfarenheter elever har i relation till fett utan vilka verksamhe-ter eleverna deltar i. Elevernas bruk av ‟vad de vet om fett‟ i relation till olika motiv känne-tecknas av olika tillgängliga resurser, olika gemenskaper, olika arbets-delning mellan elever och elever-lärare samt olika normer/regler för att åstadkomma det som eftersträvas. Samman-fattningsvis visar studien att det inte möjligt att urskilja elevers tidigare erfarenheter i relation till ett naturvetenskapligt fenomen eller begrepp som något i sig som kan utgöra utgångspunkt för undervisningen.

  • 25.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lager-Nyqvist, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    'What do you know about fat?' Drawing on diverse funds of knowledge in inquiry based science education2012In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 178-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Connecting students’ worlds, knowledge and experiences with school science has been a central issue in science education research. Here, we conceptualize processes of drawing on students’ personal experiences and knowledge in terms of ‘funds of knowledge’. We scrutinize two sixth grade classroom practices where the inquiry curriculum reform effort, Naturvetenskap och teknik för alla (NTA), is used. This curriculum material explicitly incorporates ideas of ‘learning science from experience’. Our aim is to contribute to a discussion on what conditions of inquiry based science education (IBSE) practices may open up opportunities for science to become personally relevant to students. The  research question investigated is: What do students do when they draw on funds of knowledge that are related to students’ memberships and experiences out-of-school in IBSE pratices? We then use Cultural-Historical Activity Theory framework to analyze how students’ actions of drawing on different funds of knowledge gain meaning in relation to different cultural-historical motives. Our findings indicate that students, when positioning themselves as part of different communities in relation to different goals and overall motives, make use of quite different funds of knowledge. Finally, we discuss possibilities for expanding and acknowledging students’ funds of knowledge when working with  investigations in the science classroom.

  • 26.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lager-Nyqvist, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Play with Science in Inquiry Based Science Education2012In:  Science learning and Citizenship.  E-bok: http://lsg.ucy.ac.cy/esera/e_book/base/table-of-content.html.: The ESERA 2011 conference. / [ed] C. Bruguière, A.Tiberghien & P.Clément, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In science education students sometimes engage in imaginary science-oriented play where ideas about science and scientists are put to use. Through play, children interpret their experiences, dramatize, give life to and transform what they know into a lived narrative. In this paper we build on the work of Vygotsky on imagination and creativity. Previous research on play in primary and secondary school has focused on play as a method for formal instruction rather than students’ spontaneous informal play. Our aim is to explore students’ informal play as part of activity in lower secondary school science. The empirical study was conducted as part of a larger study on learning, narrative knowing and remembering in inquiry based science education in two Swedish compulsory schools. Data were collected during 10 weeks using video- and audiotape recordings. Our analyses of play show that the students step in and out of play when engaging in task completion. Play offers opportunities for sense-making, opposition and exploration of ways of enacting science identities. Implications for teaching science are that teachers, in order to promote students’ learning about science as a cultural endeavor and students’ learning about themselves in relation to science and scientist communities, may encourage students’ informal play.

  • 27.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lager-Nyqvist, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Play with Science in Inquiry Based Science Education2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In science education students sometimes engage in imaginary science-oriented play where ideas about science and scientists are put to use. Through play, children interpret their experiences, dramatize, give life to and transform what they know into a lived narrative. In this paper we build on the work of Vygotsky on imagination and creativity. Previous research on play in primary and secondary school has focused on play as a method for formal instruction rather than students’ spontaneous informal play. Our aim is to explore students’ informal play as part of activity in lower secondary school science. The empirical study was conducted as part of a larger study on learning, narrative knowing and remembering in inquiry based science education in two Swedish compulsory schools. Data were collected during 10 weeks using video- and audiotape recordings. The results show that the studied classroom practices offer students a variety of resources that may be used to engage in spontaneous play with science. We discern two categories of play: role-playing and game-playing involving transformations of classroom tasks and opening up for different social positioning in relation to science. Implications for teaching science is that teachers, in order to promote students learning about science as a cultural endeavor and about themselves in relation to science and scientist communities may encourage students’ informal play.

  • 28.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Argumentation and Critique in Science Citizenship Education and Scientific Literacy: Symposium on Literacy and Didactics: Perspectives, Practices and Consequences I2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How citizenship education should be designed and what it should aim for is debated. The Swedish national curriculum describes the democratic mission for the compulsory school as imparting respect for human rights, fundamental democratic values and preparing students to responsibly participate in societal life. This mission is to be implemented in all school subjects. Here, we aim to shed light on how these ideas are expressed in the curriculum documents for science education in compulsory school in terms of argumentation and critique. We perform an analysis of the national syllabuses and commentary materials and also discuss the results from educational philosophy perspectives. First, we scrutinize the idea of developing students’ abilities to engage in argumentation, argumentation as means to reach consensus and argumentation as dissensus and agonism from a radical democratic perspective. Second, we scrutinize the idea of critique as expressed in the documents in relation to what has been described as a neo-liberal discourse of independence and integrity. We summarize our findings in what we suggest to be a tension between consensus and agonism. We point to affordances and constraints in the curriculum documents concerning possibilities of bringing together argumentation and critique in what we call critical deliberative education.

  • 29.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Scientific literacy som argumentation och kritik2013In: Scientific Literacy: teori och praktik / [ed] Eva Lundqvist, Roger Säljö & Leif Östman, Malmö: Gleerup , 2013, p. 87-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Who is the democratic citizen?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Remembering as access points for scientific literacy2013In: EARLI 2013 Book of Abstracts, 2013, p. 1053-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central issue for educational research is how education may contribute to the personal development of children. A condition for developing such classroom practices is that access points to shared experiences are established in the classroom. The aim of this contribution is to illustrate how remembering can be understood as a situated and transformational activity shared by students and teachers in finding access points to scientific literacy. We ask how shared remembering functions as a pedagogical arrangement to make teaching experiences in science available for students’ continued reflection. Memories are often treated in education as entities being stored in the brain and which can be retrieved on demand. When approached from a sociocultural, situative and pragmatic perspective, memory does not come ready-made. Here, we draw on a six-week Chemistry project in primary school. We analyse one episode from a teacher-led group conversation where students report their ‘inquiry-home-work’ on the water-solubility of different food. This pedagogical sequence is an example of an arrangement with a purpose to make inquiry aspects of scientific literacy available to students through remembering. We find that the teacher draws on a broad repertoire of ways to construct a collective narrative of inquiry. The remembering requires joint negotiation of what is to be remembered. This joint negotiation has conceptual consequences in that it is simultaneously a negotiation of what instances qualify as examples of the phenomena of solubility and of what is necessary to make explicit in order to reflect upon the qualities of inquiry work.

  • 32.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lager-Nyqvist, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Remembering as Instructional Work in the Science Classroom2017In: Memory Practices and Learning: Interactional, Institutional and Sociocultural Perspectives / [ed] Åsa Mäkitalo, Per Linell, Roger Säljö, Information Age Publishing, 2017, p. 75-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Anker-Hansen, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Affordances and Constraints of Using the Socio-Political Debate for Authentic Summative Assessment2015In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 37, no 15, p. 2577-2596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports from an empirical study on the affordances and constraints for using staged socio-political debates for authentic summative assessment of scientific literacy. The article focuses on conditions for student participation and what purposes emerge in student interaction in a socio-political debate. As part of the research project, a socio-political debate was designed for assessing student competences of scientific literacy in classroom practices. The debate centred on a fictive case about a lake where a decline in the yield of fish had been established. The students were assigned the task of participating in the debate from appointed roles as different stakeholders. Data were collected with video recordings of the enacted student debates. Student participation was analysed with the theoretical framework of communities of practice. The results show that multiple conflicting purposes of the socio-political debate as an assessment task emerged. The emergent purposes were: (I) putting scientific knowledge on display versus staying true to one’s role, (II) putting scientific knowledge on display versus expressing social responsibility, (III) putting scientific knowledge on display versus winning the debate, (IV) using sources tactically versus using sources critically. As these purposes emerged in classroom practice, tensions between different ways of enacting participation in the debates became manifest. Based on these findings, this paper discusses the affordances and constraints for using a socio-political debate for classroom-based assessment of scientific literacy and argumentation in terms of validity, reliability and affordability.

  • 34.
    Anker-Hansen, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Challenging and Expanding Science Teachers’ Assessment Repertoires Through Social ModerationIn: Assessment in education: Principles, Policy & Practice, ISSN 0969-594X, E-ISSN 1465-329XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Curriculumreforms in Sweden have gradually shifted science education syllabi towards amore citizen-oriented science. Swedish science teachers have expresseduncertainty how to assess new syllabi standards concerning communication,source critique and decision-making. Research indicates that assessmentmoderation meetings, where teachers meet and assess together, are more helpfulto teachers in development of a joint assessment practice than externallyproduced tests. This article reports from an intervention study thatinvestigates the possibilities for using assessment moderation meetings forexpanding teachers’ assessment repertoires for challenging aspects of thescience subjects’ syllabi. Assessment moderation meetings were studied in twoschools with different discourses for assessing science and analysed with thetheory of expansive learning. Teachers for one of the schools constantlyelicited science and interpreted students’ answers, whereas the teachers fromthe other school demanded that their students elaborated scientific aspects intheir replies and expressed themselves clearly. The teachers in both schoolsalso expanded their assessment practices in different directions depending onhow they identified contradictions between prior assessment practices and newdemands. The meetings forced the teachers to listen to the multiple voices inthe group and negotiate collective changes in the assessment practice. However,teachers could choose not to follow the expansions of their colleagues.

  • 35.
    Anker-Hansen, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    In Pursuit of Authenticity in Assessment of Scientific LiteracyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we present a systematic review of how authenticity is used in science education research and discuss the implications these uses have for designing authentic classroom assessments. Authenticity of assessments have been discussed in education generally for decades, and depending on what is regarded as authentic science, assessment in science education becomes different. In this article we review research articles published between 2013 and 2014, in the three highest ranking journals in science education, regarding how authenticity is framed in science education. Our findings suggest that the uses vary greatly from referring to externally defined practices to student relevance. The findings are discussed with the notions of cultural and personal authenticity to suggest important aspects involved with designing science classroom assessments authentic to the different references. As a conclusion, we present a strategy for balancing assessment between cultural and personal authenticity.

  • 36.
    Anker-Hansen, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Skolverket.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    In Pursuit of Authenticity in Science Education2019In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 498-510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a systematic review of how authenticity is used in science education research and discusses the implications these uses have for the design of science education classroom practices. Authenticity has been discussed in education for decades. However, the authenticity of science education not only concerns the design of educational activities, but also the content of what is being taught. This article reviews research articles published in 2013 and 2014, in the three highest ranking journals in science education, regarding how authenticity is framed in science education. The findings suggest that the uses vary greatly from referring to externally defined practices to student relevance. The findings are discussed with the notions of cultural and personal authenticity to suggest important aspects involved with designing science classroom activities authentic to the different references. Based on the review, we have developed a strategy for balancing authenticity in science education classroom practices between cultural and personal authenticity.

  • 37.
    Anker-Hansen, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Using and Rejecting Peer Feedback in the Science Classroom: A Study of Students’ Negotiations on How to Use Peer Feedback When Designing ExperimentsIn: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, the failing effects of using peer assessment have been explained by deficits of the feedback, for example, the lack of clear suggestions on how to improve the work or students having different views of what counts as high-quality work. However, there is a need to further study the dialogicity of students as both providers and receivers of feedback in a social process of the science classroom. The study was conducted in four lower secondary school classes, school year 8 and 9, in two different schools. An intervention study was designed focussing on the topic of experimental design, involving the students in a process of peer assessment where they designed experiments individually, and then exchanged their designs, conducted each other’s experiments, provided feedback to each other and revised their original design after discussing the feedback in groups. Data were collected in the form of audio recordings of student discussions and written work. The peer feedback included varied aspects of the experiment regarding personal relevance, scientific inquiry or confirmation of what students already knew of health. Students could be supported in rejecting feedback, convinced to address feedback, or even renegotiate what counted as high quality in the discussion groups. The results show that the feedback the students provided to each other was used as frequently as the feedback they had received when they revised their design. Peer feedback that did not result in revisions could still be used for defining the quality of the experimental design. The potential for using peer assessment in science education could not only be evaluated through the students’ revisions.

  • 38. Anker-Hansen, Jens
    et al.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Using and rejecting peer feedback in the science classroom: a study of students' negotiations on how to use peer feedback when designing experiments2019In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 346-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research on peer assessment has noted ambiguity among students in using peer assessment for improving their work. Previous research has explained this in terms of deficits in the student feedback, or differences in student views of what counts as high-quality work. Purpose: This study frames peer assessment as a social process in the science classroom. The aim is to explore peer assessment in science education as social practice in order to contribute to an understanding of the affordances and constraints of using peer assessment as a learning tool in science education. Design and Method: The study was conducted in four lower secondary school classes, school years 8 and 9, in two different schools. An intervention study was designed focussing on the topic of experimental design. It involved the students in a process of peer assessment where they designed experiments individually, and then exchanged their designs, conducted each other's experiments, provided feedback to each other and revised their original design after discussing the feedback in groups. Data were collected in the form of audio recordings of student discussions and written work. Results: The results show that, although not all peer feedback resulted in revisions, peer feedback was useful to the students in group interaction when negotiating quality in their work. Conclusions: To conclude, the potential for using peer assessment in science education should not only be evaluated through the students' revisions but also in terms of in what ways the feedback constitutes interactional resources for defining quality in student work.

  • 39. Bergvall, Cecilia
    et al.
    Lavett-Lagerström, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Södermalmsskolan i Stockholm, Sweden; STLS, Stockholm Teaching & Learning Studies, Sweden.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. STLS, Stockholm Teaching & Learning Studies, Sweden.
    Elevers förmåga att planera undersökningar – en kritisk granskning av stödmaterial för bedömning i NO åk 1-62018In: Forskning om undervisning och lärande, ISSN 2000-9674, E-ISSN 2001-6131, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 6-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focusses on the assessment of students’ capabilities to engage in systematic investigations in science, concerning the planning of such an investigation. The aim is to develop knowledge on how task design may enable and constrain the assessment of students’ capabilities to engage in systematic investigations. The study consists of a critical review of affordances and constraints of a diagnostic material (the DiNO-material) provided by the National Agency of Education as a tool for assessing students´ capabilities to engage in inquiry. The DiNO-material is intended to support teacher assessment in science education grades one to six. The study draws on a theoretical framework of socio-cultural theory and epistemic practices. The study is based on an intervention where students in grades 4, 6 and 8 were given a task from the DiNO-material aimed at assessing their capabilities to design systematic investigations. The data consists of audio recordings of student discussions. The recordings were transcribed and analyzed thematically with regard to which activity the students were engaged in while working with the task. The results show differences in how students approach and contextualize the task. Based on the findings consequences for designing tasks to assess students’ capabilities to plan systematic investigations are discussed.

  • 40.
    Björkholm, Eva
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Carlgren, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Exploring technical knowledge in the primary technology classroom2016In: Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 1449-3098, E-ISSN 1449-5554, Vol. 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore the use of categories and aspects of technical knowing which have been identified in specific contexts and related to specific learning objects to identify technical knowing and technical content in another teaching context. In this way, we want to contribute to the understanding of technical knowing within primary technology education, as well as to the development of analytical tools to help teachers in selecting and designing the content of technology teaching. Previous findings from two Learning Studies focusing on evaluating and constructing technical solutions were used to identify technical knowing in video material generated within a particular classroom practice (students aged 7-8 years old). The results suggest that the former categories and aspects can be used in different ways to identify and specify technical knowings related to technical content in the primary technology classroom.

  • 41.
    Danckwardt-Lillieström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Enghag, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Creative drama in chemistry education: a social semiotic approach2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 250-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drama is a way of teaching that has been suggested to support learning, but studies in science education are limited and the potential of using drama needs further scrutiny and design development. In this study, from an upper secondary school in Sweden, we investigate how creative drama may afford students’ meaning-making of abstract non-spontaneous chemical concepts, by exploring what kind of semiotic work students are engaged in when given the opportunity to use their own bodies as semiotic resources. We combine sociocultural theory of learning with multimodal social semiotic analysis. In our analysis, we found different types of transductions and transformations that had consequences for students' meaning-making. A conclusion is that when creative drama activities open up for students to use bodily mode in combination with a variety of other semiotic resources, the students are afforded to explore intermolecular forces in new ways.

  • 42.
    Eriksson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Teachers as lesson and learning study researchers – establishing a research environment2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the type of conditions needed if establishing a research environment for teacher driven research.

    Lesson and Learning Study (LLS) has gained a growing interest during the latest years. In most cases it is framed in relation to teachers’ professional development, teachers’ learning and school development. That is the knowledge that teachers gain from different studies are not object for dissemination and review. Thus, in most cases the aim of a LLS is not to produce knowledge outside the local context. However, LLS has a great potential to function as a research approach for teacher driven research. An approach that would make it possible for teachers to take responsibility for their own professional knowledge base (Carlgren e.g. 2012). This type of research has been compared to medical clinical research (Bulterman Bos 2008; Carlgren 2012). That is, the issues, problems and demands that teachers are trying to master in their everyday work are to be focused in the research. But further, teachers who identify such objects of research also need to be the researcher (Bulterman Bos, 2008). Several problems are related to such a research. Partly due to the lack of traditions and infrastructures, partly due to lack of teachers with formal research education. In this presentation we primarily focus on the conditions, in the form of traditions and infrastructures important to establish a research environment for teacher driven research. To date, teachers who want to conduct research on teaching and learning in their own or their colleague classrooms have to accomplish their research work under different conditions compared to university researchers. What conditions are important to establish a research environment where such research of high quality might be produced? How can teachers with little or no research training be supported to qualify their own research projects? What type of support do they need? Since teachers normally do not have access to university library resources, seminars, and workshops that are of fundamental value for university researchers (Ratkić, 2006), one issue is how such research activities may be adapted to become compatible with teachers’ work in schools? Further, how can aspects of research, such as dissemination and publications be supported and organized?

    In this paper, we provide an account of how we in Stockholm have sought to establish a dynamic research environment for teacher-driven research in an in-between space of school and university. The particular space, or platform, is called Stockholm Teaching & Learning Studies (STLS). STLS includes open seminars, subject specific networks led by senior researchers, a research conference for teachers, project research seminars, project applications and publication as a highly held value. I.e an infrastructure is built to open for discussion, verification, and refutation or modification of research findings. STLS is a platform for teachers and researchers with an interest in didactic research aiming at developing teaching. The overall objectives are to provide a research environment where teachers are offered support and opportunities to participate in didactic research and development (R&D), to develop methodological models that allow teachers to participate in conducting didactic research in school practices, to function as a ’knowledge-production-workshop’ for the processing and analyzing of data and to support and provide arenas for peer-review, writing and dissemination of research results. Some of the challenges involved in establishing STLS has concerned the creating time and resources for teachers to engage in research, developing processes of application for teachers to propose research projects and how to inviting teachers with no or very little prior experience in research.

  • 43.
    Ideland, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Arvola-Orlander, Auli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hillbur, Per
    Malmö högskola.
    Jobér, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Loken, Marianne
    Universitetet i Oslo.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö högskola.
    Serder, Margareta
    Malmö högskola.
    Who fits into the science classroom?: Critical perspectives on pedagogical models in science education.2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This mini-symposium aims to stress issues about how pedagogical models like e.g. SSI, science for girls and ESD construct who fits in or not in the science classroom. These models are developed from a good intention of including "all" students, opening up possibilities for them who often are seen as outsiders in science culture. But we claim that these seemingly democratic pedagogical models fabricate desirable and undesirable subjects. Often, the norms for fitting in can be understood in terms of images of gender, ethnicity and social class.

    A movement in science education research highlights the importance of making science knowledge “useful” for "everyone" in "everyday life". The aim with these efforts is to let students develop scientific literacy, which often is talked about as “necessary” for citizenship. Different practices carry strong ideas of designing the future, and emphasize the need of competences that are inscribed in the concept of “future citizen”. These competencies are often described in terms of problem-solving, critical thinking and making rational decisions to contribute to a sustainable world. In relation to this image, those children that don’t want to make decisions, solve problems become constructed as failures. In a wider perspective, they can be seen as threatening the intentions of science contribution to a sustainable world.

    In this symposium we would like to raise critical issues about what norms that are constructing individuals, from different social categories, as desirable or non-desirable in science classroom. These issues will be discussed in relation to six examples from empirical studies which are problematizing the construction of the desirable science student. These examples are: 1) PISA construction of the science student; 2) Social class in science class; 3) Narratives of females and science; 4) Gender, sexuality and normality; 5) Who is the democratic citizen?; 6) Who is the sustainable citizen?

  • 44. Ulfves, Ann
    et al.
    Fahrman, Birgit
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Om utveckling av elevers förmåga att resonera om friktion i de tidiga skolåren2017In: Forskning om undervisning och lärande, ISSN 2000-9674, E-ISSN 2001-6131, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 47-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Studien har undersökt hur elever i de tidiga skolåren kan utveckla förmåga att resonera om fenomenet friktion. Studien bygger på en intervention i årskurs 1 där elever har arbetat med begrepp för friktion och rörelse på lekplatsen. I artikeln analyseras elevfilmer där eleverna visar och berättar om friktion på en lekplats. Filmerna har analyserats fenomenografiskt. Resultaten visar på tre kvalitativt skilda sätt att erfara friktion bland eleverna: A) Friktion som relaterat till hastighet, B) Friktion som egenskap som påverkar hastighet, C) Friktion som materialegenskap som påverkar hastighet. Studien visar att elever redan i grundskolans tidiga år kan urskilja innebörder av begreppet friktion och visa differentierade skillnader i att hantera begreppet. Studien bidrar på så sätt till en precisering av vilket kunnande som kan utvecklas i tidig fysikundervisning.

  • 45.
    Wiblom, Jonna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Developing Students’ Critical Reasoning About Online Health Information‬: a Capabilities Approach‬2017In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The internet has become a main source for health-related information retrieval. In addition to information published by medical experts, individuals share their personal experiences and narratives on blogs and social media platforms. Our increasing need to confront and make meaning of various sources and conflicting health information has challenged the way critical reasoning has become relevant in science education. This study addresses how the opportunities for students to develop and practice their capabilities to critically approach online health information can be created in science education. Together with two upper secondary biology teachers, we carried out a design-based study. The participating students were given an online retrieval task that included a search and evaluation of health-related online sources. After a few lessons, the students were introduced to an evaluation tool designed to support critical evaluation of health information online. Using qualitative content analysis, four themes could be discerned in the audio and video recordings of student interactions when engaging with the task. Each theme illustrates the different ways in which critical reasoning became practiced in the student groups. Without using the evaluation tool, the students struggled to overview the vast amount of information and negotiate trustworthiness. Guided by the evaluation tool, critical reasoning was practiced to handle source subjectivity and to sift out scientific information only. Rather than a generic skill and transferable across contexts, students’ critical reasoning became conditioned by the multi-dimensional nature of health issues, the blend of various contexts and the shift of purpose constituted by the students.

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