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  • 1.
    Björklund, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hederos Eriksson, Karin
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    IQ and Family Background: Are Associations Strong or Weak?2010In: The B.E. Journals in Economic Analysis & Policy, ISSN 1935-1682, E-ISSN 1935-1682, Vol. 10, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the purpose of understanding the underlying mechanisms behind intergenerational associations in income and education, recent studies have explored the intergenerational transmission of abilities. We use a large representative sample of Swedish men to examine both intergenerational and sibling correlations in IQ. Since siblings share both parental factors and neighbourhood influences, the sibling correlation is a broader measure of the importance of family background than the intergenerational correlation. We use IQ data from the Swedish military enlistment tests. The correlation in IQ between fathers (born 1951-1956) and sons (born 1966-1980) is estimated to 0.347. The corresponding estimate for brothers (born 1951-1968) is 0.473, suggesting that family background explains approximately 50% of a person's IQ. Estimating sibling correlations in IQ, we thus find that family background has a substantially larger impact on IQ than has been indicated by previous studies examining only intergenerational correlations in IQ.

  • 2.
    Björklund, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Country case study Sweden2013In: The Great Recession and the distribution of household income / [ed] Stephen J Jenkins, Andrea Brandolini, John Micklewright and Brian Nolan, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 153-175Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Björklund, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    How important is family background for labor-economic outcomes?2012In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 465-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses Swedish register data to examine four classical outcomes in empirical labor economics: IQ noncognitive skills, years of schooling and long-run earnings. We estimate sibling correlations - and the variance components that define the sibling correlation - in these outcomes. We also estimate correlations for MZ-twins, who share all genes. We also extend the variance-component decomposition by accounting for birth order. We find that conventional intergenerational approaches severely underestimate the role of family background, and that future research should follow a more multidimensional approach to the study of family background.

  • 4.
    Björklund, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    SNS Välfärdsrapport 2011.: Inkomstfördelningen i Sverige2011Book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Björklund, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nybom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Parental education gradients over the life cycle2012In: From Parents to Children: The Intergenerational Transmission of Advantage / [ed] Ermisch, John; Jäntti, Markus; Smeeding, Timothy, Russell Sage Foundation , 2012, p. 422-440Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Björklund, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nybom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU), Sweden.
    The Contribution of Early-life Versus Labour Market Factors to Intergenerational Income Persistence: A Comparison of the UK and Sweden2017In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 127, p. F71-F94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore whether differences in intergenerational income mobility between the UK and Sweden show up early in life, finding stronger associations between parental income and birthweight, height and school performance in the UK. We investigate whether these differentials can account for the country difference in income mobility. While differences in the associations in birthweight and height are too weak to matter, school performance does account for a substantial part of this difference. However, country differences in the earnings returns to these skills are at least as important as the differences in the link between parental income and skills.

  • 7.
    Björklund, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Roemer, John E.
    Equality of opportunity and the distribution of long-run income in Sweden2012In: Social Choice and Welfare, ISSN 0176-1714, E-ISSN 1432-217X, Vol. 39, no 2-3, p. 675-696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equality of opportunity is an ethical goal with almost universal appeal. The interpretation taken here is that a society has achieved equality of opportunity if it is the case that what individuals accomplish, with respect to some desirable objective, is determined wholly by their choices and personal effort, rather than by circumstances beyond their control. We use data for Swedish men born between 1955 and 1967 for whom we measure the distribution of long-run income, as well as several important background circumstances, such as parental education and income, family structure and own IQ before adulthood. We address the question: in Sweden, given its present constellation of social policies and institutions, to what extent is existing income inequality due to circumstances, as opposed to 'effort'? Our results suggest that several circumstances, importantly both parental income and own IQ, are important for long-run income inequality, but that variations in individual effort account for the most part of that inequality.

  • 8. D'Ambrosio, Conchita
    et al.
    Frick, Joachim R.
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Satisfaction with life and economic well-being: Evidence from Germany2009In: Schmollers Jahrbuch (Journal of Applied Social Science Studies), ISSN 1439-121X, Vol. 129, no 2, p. 283-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between an individual's economic well-being and satisfaction with own life has been the focus of many studies both within and across countries, in one period of time and over time. As a proxy of economic well-being household income both adjusted and unadjusted for household needs has been generally used. The aim of the present paper is to propose a more comprehensive measure of well-being considering the role that wealth and permanent income play in simultaneously determining satisfaction with life. The results, based on representative microdata from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP), suggest that both income and wealth increase satisfaction, that long-run income is more appropriate than short-term income and that satisfaction with life is particularly high for those who are at the top of both the income and wealth distributions.

  • 9. Ermisch, John
    et al.
    Jäntti, MarkusStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).Smeeding, Timothy
    From Parents to Children: The Intergenerational Transmission of Advantage2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Does economic inequality in one generation lead to inequality of opportunity in the next? In From Parents to Children, an esteemed international group of scholars investigates this question using data from ten countries with differing levels of inequality. The book compares whether and how parents' resources transmit advantage to their children at different stages of development and sheds light on the structural differences among countries that may influence intergenerational mobility.

    How and why is economic mobility higher in some countries than in others? The contributors find that inequality in mobility-relevant skills emerges early in childhood in all of the countries studied. Bruce Bradbury and his coauthors focus on learning readiness among young children and show that as early as age five, large disparities in cognitive and other mobility-relevant skills develop between low- and high-income kids, particularly in the United States and the United Kingdom. Such disparities may be mitigated by investments in early childhood education, as Christelle Dumas and Arnaud Lefranc demonstrate. They find that universal pre-school education in France lessens the negative effect of low parental SES and gives low-income children a greater shot at social mobility. Katherine Magnuson, Jane Waldfogel, and Elizabeth Washbrook find that income-based gaps in cognitive achievement in the United States and the United Kingdom widen as children reach adolescence. Robert Haveman and his coauthors show that the effect of parental income on test scores increases as children age; and in both the United States and Canada, having parents with a higher income betters the chances that a child will enroll in college.

    As economic inequality in the United States continues to rise, the national policy conversation will not only need to address the devastating effects of rising inequality in this generation but also the potential consequences of the decline in mobility from one generation to the next. Drawing on unparalleled international datasets, From Parents to Children provides an important first step

  • 10. Ermisch, John
    et al.
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Smeeding, Timothy
    Socioeconomic Gradients in Children’s Outcomes2012In: From Parents to Children: The Intergenerational Transmission of Advantage / [ed] Ermisch, John; Jäntti, Markus; Smeeding, Timothy, Russell Sage Foundation , 2012, p. 32-52Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11. Ermisch, John
    et al.
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Smeeding, Timothy
    Wilson, James A.
    Advantage in Comparative Perspective2012In: From Parents to Children: The Intergenerational Transmission of Advantage / [ed] Ermisch, John; JÀntti, Markus; Smeeding, Timothy, Russell Sage Foundation , 2012, p. 3-31Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12. Ermisch, John
    et al.
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Smeeding, Timothy
    Wilson, James A.
    What Have We Learned?2012In: From Parents to Children: The Intergenerational Transmission of Advantage / [ed] Ermisch, John; Jäntti, Markus; Smeeding, Timothy, Russell Sage Foundation , 2012, p. 463-481Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13. Gornick, Janet C.
    et al.
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Child poverty in cross-national perspective: Lessons from the Luxembourg Income Study2012In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 558-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) microdata to paint a portrait of child poverty across a diverse group of countries, as of 2004-2006. We will first synthesize past LIS-based research on child poverty, focusing on studies that aim to explain cross-national variation in child poverty rates. Our empirical sections will focus on child poverty in 20 high- and middle-income countries including three Latin American countries, newly added to LIS. We will assess poverty among all households and among those with children, and using multiple poverty measures (relative and absolute, pre- and post-taxes and transfers). We will assess the effects of crucial micro-level factors - family structure, educational attainment, and labor market attachment - considering how the effects of these factors vary across counties. Finally, we will analyze the extent to which cross-national variation in child poverty is explained by families' characteristics and/or by the effects of (or returns to) those characteristics. Those returns encompass both market and state-generated income.

  • 14. Gornick, Janet C.
    et al.
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Child poverty in upper-income countries: lessons from the Luxembourg income study2009In: From child welfare to child well-being: an international perspective on knowledge in the service of  policy making / [ed] Sheila B. Kamerman, Shelley Phipps, Asher Ben-Arieh, Dordrecht: Springer, 2009, p. 339-370Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15. Gornick, Janet C
    et al.
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Child Poverty in Upper-Income Countries: Lesssons from the Luxembourg Income Study2010In: From child welfare to child well-being: an international perspective on knowledge in the service of making policy. A special volume in honor of Alfred J. Kahn / [ed] Kamerman, Sheila B; Phipps, Shelley; Ben-Arieh, Asher, Springer , 2010, p. 339-368Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16. Gornick, Janet C.
    et al.
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Gender, Poverty and Social Policy Regimes: A Comparative Analysis of Twenty-Four Upper-Income Countries2011In: FISS book / [ed] Saunders, Peter; Sainsbury, Roy, Intersentia , 2011, Vol. 16, p. 63-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17. Gornick, Janet C
    et al.
    Jäntti, MarkusStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Income Inequality: Economic Disparities and the Middle Class in Affluent Countries2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 18. Gornick, Janet
    et al.
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Conclusion2013In: Income Inequality: Economic Disparities and the Middle Class in Affluent Countries / [ed] Janet C. Gornick and Markus Jäntti, Stanford University Press Stanford University Press, 2013, p. 487-496Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19. Gornick, Janet
    et al.
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Introduction2013In: Income Inequality: Economic Disparities and the Middle Class in Affluent Countries / [ed] Janet C. Gornick and Markus Jäntti, Stanford University Press, 2013, p. 1-50Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Hederos Eriksson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindahl, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Torssander, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Trends in life expectancy by income and the role of specific causes of death2014Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Hederos, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindahl, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Gender and inequality of opportunity in Sweden2017In: Social Choice and Welfare, ISSN 0176-1714, E-ISSN 1432-217X, Vol. 49, no 3-4, p. 605-635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers the role of gender in generating inequality of opportunity. Using data on long-run income for Swedish men and women, we explore to what extent income inequality is due to circumstances beyond individuals' control, such as gender and parental income, rather than to differences in individuals' choices. The key idea is that a society has achieved equality of opportunity if there is no income inequality that is due to circumstances. Analyzing men and women separately, we find that circumstances account for up to 31% of income inequality among men and up to 25% among women. We conclude that there is greater equality of opportunity among women than among men. When we analyze men and women together, treating gender as a circumstance, at most 38% of income inequality can be attributed to circumstances. Gender accounts for up to 13% of income inequality, making gender the single most important circumstance in accounting for inequality in long-run income in Sweden.

  • 22.
    Hederos, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Lindahl, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Torssander, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Trends in Life Expectancy by Income and the Role of Specific Causes of Death2018In: Economica, ISSN 0013-0427, E-ISSN 1468-0335, Vol. 85, no 339, p. 606-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how life expectancy at age 35 has evolved across the income distribution in Sweden over time. We examine individual income for men 1970–2007 and family income for both men and women 1980–2007. During this period, income inequality increased in most western countries, but especially so in Sweden. Drawing on a large sample of the Swedish population, our results show that the gap in life expectancy between the richest and poorest fifths of the income distribution also increased. This was the case both for individual and family income. The increase was larger for men than for women, but the only group with stagnant life expectancy at age 35 was women in the lowest income quintile group. Between 1986 and 2007, the difference between the lowest and highest family income quintiles increased by about one year for women and by almost two years for men. The causes of death that most significantly contributed to the increased disparities among women were circulatory and respiratory diseases. For men, circulatory disease mortality alone caused most of the increased disparities.

  • 23.
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Mobility in the United States in comparative perspective2009In: Changing poverty, changing policies / [ed] Maria Cancian, Sheldon Danziger, New York: Russell Sage Foundation , 2009, p. 180-200Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Jäntti, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jenkins, Stephen P.
    The impact of macroeconomic conditions on income inequality2010In: Journal of Economic Inequality, ISSN 1569-1721, E-ISSN 1573-8701, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 221-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the relationship between macroeconomic factors and the income distribution using data on equivalized disposable household income from the United Kingdom for 1961–99. We argue in favour of fitting a parametric functional form to the income distribution for each year, and then modeling the time series of model parameters in terms of the macroeconomic factors, as this better allows us to take into account non-stationarity in the time series. Estimates from models that relate income distribution parameters to cyclical variables in first differences (to account for non-stationarity) suggest that neither inflation nor unemployment have significant effects on income inequality. Compared to the commonly-used method of modelling the income shares directly, our approach indicates that there was no clear cut relationship between macroeconomic factors and the UK income distribution during the last third of the twentieth century.

  • 25.
    Jäntti, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Kanbur, Ravi
    Nyyssölä, M
    Pirttilä, J
    Poverty and Welfare Measurement on the Basis of Prospect Theory2014In: The Review of Income and Wealth, ISSN 0034-6586, E-ISSN 1475-4991, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 182-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the measurement of social welfare, poverty, and inequality, taking into account features that have been found to be important welfare determinants in behavioral economics. Most notably, we incorporate reference-dependence, loss aversion, and diminishing sensitivity—aspects emphasized in Prospect Theory—to social welfare measurement. We suggest a new notion of equivalent income, the income level with which the individual would be as well off, evaluated using a standard concave utility function, as he actually is, evaluated with a reference-dependent utility function. We examine the differences between standard poverty and inequality measures based on observed income and measures that are calculated based on equivalent income. These differences are illustrated using household-level panel data from Russia and Vietnam.

  • 26.
    Jäntti, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindahl, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    On the Variability of Income within and Across Generations2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the association of income variability both within and across generations based on a heterogeneous growth model of permanent and transitory income in Sweden. Non-parametric regressions reveal that income variability is strongly associated with long-run levels of income, especially for low- and highincome earners, and that it is also strongly associated across generations.

  • 27.
    Jäntti, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindahl, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    On the variability of income within and across generations2012In: Economics Letters, ISSN 0165-1765, E-ISSN 1873-7374, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 165-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the association of income variability both within and across generations based on a heterogeneous growth model of permanent and transitory income in Sweden. Non-parametric regressions reveal that income variability is strongly associated with long-run levels of income, especially for low- and high-income earners, and that it is also strongly associated across generations.

  • 28.
    Jäntti, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Pirttilä, Jukka
    Kanbur, Ravi
    Poverty, Development, and Behavioral Economics2014In: The Review of Income and Wealth, ISSN 0034-6586, E-ISSN 1475-4991, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Jäntti, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Luxembourg Income Study, Luxembourg.
    Pirttilä, Jukka
    Selin, Håkan
    Estimating labour supply elasticities based on cross-country micro data: A bridge between micro and macro estimates?2015In: Journal of Public Economics, ISSN 0047-2727, E-ISSN 1879-2316, Vol. 127, p. 87-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nordic model relies on high tax rates to finance an extensive welfare state. If labour supply elasticities are large, the burden of financing the model can be large even if, arguably, the practice of providing subsidised goods that support labour supply is likely to mitigate these effects. We utilise repeated cross sections of micro data from several countries, including the four major Nordic countries, available from the Luxembourg Income Study, LIS, to estimate labour supply elasticities, both at the intensive and extensive margins. The data span over four decades and include a large number of tax reform episodes, with tax rate variation arising both from cross-sectional and country-level differences. Using these data, we investigate whether micro and macro estimates differ in a systematic way. The results do not provide strong support for the view that elasticities at the macro level would be higher than the corresponding micro elasticities.

  • 30.
    Jäntti, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Riihelä, Marja
    Sullström, Risto
    Tuomala, Matti
    Trends in top income shares in Finland2010In: Top Incomes : A Global Perspective / [ed] Anthony B. Atkinson, Thomas Piketty, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2010, p. 371-447Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Jäntti, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sierminska, Eva M.
    Van Kerm, Philippe
    Modeling the Joint Distribution of Income and Wealth2015In: Measurement of Poverty, Deprivation, and Economic Mobility / [ed] Thesia I. Garner, Kathleen S. Short, Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015, p. 301-329Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers a parametric model for the joint distribution of income and wealth. The model is used to analyze income and wealth inequality in five OECD countries using comparable household-level survey data. We focus on the dependence parameter between the two variables and study whether accounting for wealth and income jointly reveals a different pattern of social inequality than the traditional income only approach. We find that cross-country variations in the dependence parameter effectively account only for a small fraction of cross-country differences in a bivariate measure of inequality. The index appears primarily driven by differences in inequality in the wealth distribution.

  • 32.
    Jäntti, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sierminska, Eva
    van Kerm, Philippe
    The Joint Distribution of Income and Wealth2013In: Income Inequality: Economic Disparities and the Middle Class in Affluent Countries / [ed] Janet C. Gornick and Markus Jäntti, Stanford University Press, 2013, p. 312-333Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Lindquist, Matthew
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Björklund, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Family Background and Income during the Rise of the Welfare State: Brother Correlations in Income for Swedish Men Born 1932-19682009In: Journal of Public Economics, ISSN 0047-2727, E-ISSN 1879-2316, Vol. 93, no 5-6, p. 671-680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate if the association between family background and income in Sweden has changed for men born between 1932 and 1968. Our main finding is that the share of the variance in long-run income that is attributable to family background, the so-called brother correlation in income, has fallen by some 17% from 0.49 for the cohorts of brothers born in the early 1930s to below 0.32 for the cohorts born around 1950. From then on, the correlations have inched back up to around 0.37. We report suggestive evidence that the decline is driven by changes in education.

  • 34.
    Smeeding, Timothy M.
    et al.
    the Institute for Research on Poverty and Distinguished Professor of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin–Madison..
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Introduction2011In: Persistence, Privilege, and Parenting: The Comparative Study of Intergenerational Mobility / [ed] Timothy M Smeeding, Robert Erikson, and Markus Jäntti, New York: Russell Sage Foundation , 2011, p. 1-25Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Smeeding, Timothy M.
    et al.
    Institute for Research on Poverty and Distinguished Professor of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin–Madison..
    Erikson, RobertStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).Jäntti, MarkusStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Persistence, Privilege, and Parenting:  The Comparative Study of Intergenerational Mobility2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
1 - 35 of 35
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