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  • 1. He, Liping
    et al.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages, Japanese Studies.
    China: how size matters – a comparative study of ownership in Japanese and Swedish aid projects2007In: Aid relationships in Asia: exploring ownership in Japanese and Nordic aid / [ed] Alf Morten Jerve, Yasutami Shimomura, Annette Skovstedt Hansen, Baskingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007, p. 153-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2. Luvsanjamts, Lkham
    et al.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages, Japanese Studies.
    Mongolia: unpredictable ownership - comparing a Japanese and a Swedish funded projectin Mongolia2007In: Aid relationships in Asia: exploring ownership in Japanese and Nordic aid / [ed] Alf Morten Jerve, Yasutami Shimomura, Annette Skovstedt Hansen, Baskingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007, p. 116-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages.
    Bistånd till Kina skapar debatt i Japan2004In: Kina-rapport, ISSN 0345-5807, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Can Japanese aid to North Korea create peace and stability?2006In: The Other Binary: Why Japan-North Korea Relations Matter, University of British Columbia, Vancover , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Changes in Japanese Foreign Aid Policy2002Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: The main part of Japanese aid is directed to Asia and there has been a strong emphasis on economic infrastructure, that is building railways, roads and ports etc. Recently however there is a refocusing towards environmental aid and “softer” types of aid such as poverty alleviation and social infrastructure. ODA that used to be based on the request from the recipient countries has become much more politicised, with Japan itself making country assistance plans indicating what fields they are willing to provide aid in. This is not always popular with the recipient government as in the case of China. In this case it has actually made Japan’s already complex relation with China even more complicated. The paper will start with a short historic review of Japanese ODA policy and the characteristics of Japanese aid. This will be followed by an explanation of the changes going on in Japanese foreign aid policy and finally we will see how this how this effect aid to China and the role of aid in the future Japan-China relationship.

  • 6.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Changes in Japan’s Foreign and Security Policy2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: At the moment, very substantial reforms in the field of security are being undertaken in Japan. “The New National Defence Program Guidelines for 2005 and After”, as well as the “Midterm Defence Program Fiscal Year 2005-2009” both talk about a thorough restructuring of the Self Defence Forces to make them able to respond effectively to new threats, such as terrorism and weapons of mass destruction, as well as provide a more proactive Japanese policy with various initiatives to improve the international security environment. There is a definite strengthening of the Japanese-US security relation, where Japan is being asked to and is willing to take a bigger role. The declaration by North Korea that they now possess nuclear weapons is considered an imminent threat to Japan. This, in connection with the abduction issue (see below) is played up in Japanese mass media and is being used by certain groups to create changes in Japan’s defence posture. These are changes that the Japanese consider necessary to counter the larger threat in the long term, the rise of China. This paper will start with a short historic overview of the Japanese defence posture since World War II and give a short presentation of the kinds of threats Japan feels it is facing since September 11, 2001, and in the future. Then we will continue with Japanese-North Korean relations, and Japanese-Chinese relations. The recent strengthening of the Japanese-US security cooperation, and its implications for Japanese defence posture, as well as regional cooperation, will be covered. We will conclude with what these changes imply for Europe, as well as the role Europe could play in securing peace and stability in Asia.

  • 7.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    De japanska tidningarnas tillkomst och roll i slutet av 1800-talet2001In: Orientaliska Studier, no 105Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Exodus to North Korea: Shadows from Japan’s Cold War2008In: Pacific AffairsArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages, Japanese Studies.
    Foreign aid as a tool for peace buildning: is the goal security or poverty reduction?2010In: Japan’s politics and economy: perspectives on change / [ed] Marie Söderberg, Patricia A. Nelson, London: Routledge, 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Global Governance and Japan: The institutional architecture2007In: Social Science Japan JournalArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Introduction2002In: The Chinese-Japanese Relations in the Twenty-first Century, Complementarity and Conflict, 2002Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Is Foreign Aid, or Expectation of Such Aid, an Effective Tool to Influence North Korea?2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Peace building and peace preservation are new key concepts in Japanese foreign aid policy. According to the revision of the ODA charter in 2003, the objective of Japan’s foreign aid is to contribute to the peace and development of the international community, and thereby to help ensure Japan’s own security and prosperity--“Japan aspires for world peace. Actively promoting the aforementioned effort with ODA” that Japan will carry out “even more strategically” in the future. Asia and especially East Asia is pointed out as a priority region. North Korea, with whom Japan has not yet normalised its relations, is one of Japan’s closest neighbours and would, from a logical point of view, then seem like an important starting point. However, when main Japanese aid agencies such as JICA (Japan International Co-operation Agency) and JBIC (Japan Bank of International Co-operation) are asked, no one works officially with aid to North Korea. The standard answer is that there is no aid to that country, besides some smaller amounts of Japanese humanitarian aid that are channelled through multilateral organisations. If Japan regards aid as one of its main tools for creating peace, why isn’t aid provided to North Korea? Aid is a very complex issue and not giving is often regarded as effective as giving, when it comes to getting concessions and changes in the recipients’ policy behaviour. It is used both as a carrot and a stick. Aid is always envisioned as something quite plausible, if North Korean policy behaviour is changed for the better according to Japanese judgement (so called positive aid sanction); but aid is never paid out and remains an illusion as long as it does not change (negative sanction). But the question for Japan is more complex than this. There are various domestic opinions and interest groups that have to be taken into consideration. The kidnapping issue (Japanese citizens kidnapped by North Korea in the 1970s) has lead to a considerable amount of anti-North Korean sentiment that makes it difficult for the Japanese government to disperse aid to North Korea. There is also foreign pressure at work; the US, Japan’s military ally, and other western countries as well have imposed economic sanctions on North Korea due to its withdrawal from the nuclear non-proliferation treaty. This also affects the Japanese position on the aid question. Keeping all these factors in mind, this paper questions if Japanese foreign aid is an effective tool to influence North Korean policy behaviour. Has it ever led to a change of behaviour? Has it contributed to peace and stability in the area in any way?

  • 13.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Japan and Greater China, Political Economy and Military Power in the Asian Century2003In: China Review InternationalArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Japan’s Development Aid to China: The Long-Running Foreign Policy of Engagement2006In: Pacific affairs, Vol. 79, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Japan´S Economic Diplomacy with China 1945-19782002In: Social Science Japan Journal, Vol. 5, no 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Japan's Military Export Policy1986Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Japans ODA Policy in Northeast Asia2002Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: The world’s largest donor of ODA during the 1990s, Japan, is now making substantial cuts. ODA decreased by three per cent for the fiscal year ending March 2002 and for the coming year another ten percent cut will be made. This is an attempt to improve the situation of the Japanese state budget that after ten years of economic stagnation or recession is running with a huge deficit. Coupled with this we have the falling value of the yen, which further decreases what the recipients can expect to get from Japan. Under present conditions conventional Japanese ODA is not likely to play a major role in the development in Northeast Asia, at least not in the short term perspective. There is considerable space, however, for a number of initiatives from local levels and Japanese NGO:s. I will start by looking at what countries that have a chance of getting ODA. This will be followed by a general overview of Japanese ODA and what future trends will look like. Aid to Mongolia will be analysed and then aid to Japan’s largest recipient, namely China, and on-going changes there in. Finally I will conclude with suggestions for small scale measures that might enhance Japan’s image in the area.

  • 18.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Planning and Administration of Contacts with Multilateral Organisations: The Swedish Case2004In: International Organisations and Japan, Analysis and Evaluation, Nihon Keizai Hyoronsha, Tokyo , 2004Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Political Turning Points – Rhetorical Analyses of Japanese Inauguration Speeches2003In: Orientaliska studierArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    South Korean Global Co-operation on Aid: Is Korean Unification Creating Difficulties for Co-operation with Other Donors?2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Swedish Perceptions of Japanese ODA2005In: Japan’s Foreign Aid, Old Continuities and new directions, Routledge, London , 2005Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    The Business of Japanese Foreign Aid: Five Cases in Asia1996Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    The Chinese-Japanese Relations in the Twenty-first Century: Complimentarity and Conflict2002Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    The Japanese Citizen´s Incresing Participation in “Civil Society”; Implications for Foreign Aid2002Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: The general aim of this paper is to review structural factors in Japan’s domestic and international context that are driving changes in Japan’s civil society. The opening up of the Japanese market and the globalization of the world economy, the information revolution and technology development, and legislative changes are some of the structural factors driving the changes. Finally we will se how two legislative changes, information disclosure as well as the NPO law are affecting Japanese foreign aid policy.

  • 25.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    The Series Novel at the End of the 19th Century – A Comparison Between Japanese and Swedish Newspapers2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: The development of newspapers in Japan and Sweden follow radically different paths. The newspapers fulfilled quite different roles in the two countries and were to an extensive degree reflecting the societies in which they were produced. This paper will start by giving a short overview of the development of the newspaper industry in Japan and in Sweden. A comparison will be made between the types of newspapers that were produced as well as to their content. We will then continue with a comparison of the popular press, the koshimbun in the Japanese case, a small format paper produced for a larger audience largely containing news of a sensational type as well as entertainment, with similar publication in Sweden. Special attention will also be given to the type of series novel that was published by the papers of both countries at the time.

  • 26.
    Söderberg, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    The Struggle for a Descent life in Japan: The Korean Minority Adopting to Changing Legal and Political Conditions2004Report (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Söderberg, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Hagström, Linus
    Introduction: Japan, the Great powers, and the coordination of North Korea Policy2006In: North Korea Policy: Japan and the Great Powers, Routledge, London , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Söderberg, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Hagström, LinusFaculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    North Korea Policy: Japan and the Great Powers2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Söderberg, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Hagström, Linus
    Taking Japan-North-Korea relations seriously: Rationale and background2006In: The Other Binary: Why Japan-North Korea Relations Matter, University of British Columbia, Vancouver , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Söderberg, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Hagström, LinusStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The Other Binary: Why Japan-North Korea Relations Matter2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Söderberg, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    He, Liping
    ODA for China: Seed Money and a Window for Contacts2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Abstract: The Chinese economy has been growing with an average of 10 per cent during the last 25 years. Walking in downtown Shanghai or Beijing, you can find some spots that are so luxurious that they are unrivalled in the world. China does not fit the picture of an average developing country. However, China is still a large recipient of foreign aid. Figures from OECD show that in 2003 the People’s Republic of China received USD 1.3 billion but ODA (Official Development Assistance), only amounts to 0.1 percent of Chinese GNP. The Chinese economic growth is certainly not dependent on foreign aid. At the government level in Beijing, ODA is seen as seed money, a window for contacts with foreign experts and technologies or as cheap financing. This paper will start by looking at China as a recipient. What are the processes of receiving aid, what do the Chinese want to get out of it and what are their priorities? This will be followed by a description of China’s main donor, Japan, where aid to China is a highly political and controversial question. After a short description of Nordic aid to China in general, we will look at Swedish aid and make case studies at the project level. In the conclusion, China as a recipient will be analysed, as well as Japan and Sweden as donors looking specifically at the concept of ownership, partnership and institutional change.

  • 32.
    Söderberg, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages.
    Luvsanjamts, Lkham
    Mongolia Heaven for Foreign Consultants2005Report (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Söderberg, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages, Japanese Studies.
    Nelson, Patricia A.
    Japan’s Politics and Economy: perspectives on change2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Söderberg, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Reader, Ian
    Japanese Influences and Presence in Asia2000Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Söderberg, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages. japanska.
    Sjöberg, Örjan
    The Sogo Shosha in Transition: Finding a New Role?2001In: . Japan’s New Economy, Continuity and Change in the Twenty-First Century, Oxford University Press, Oxford and New york , 2001Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 35 of 35
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