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  • 1. Diaz, Sandra
    et al.
    Demissew, Sebsebe
    Carabias, Julia
    Joly, Carlos
    Lonsdale, Mark
    Ash, Neville
    Larigauderie, Anne
    Adhikari, Jay Ram
    Arico, Salvatore
    Baldi, Andras
    Bartuska, Ann
    Baste, Ivar Andreas
    Bilgin, Adem
    Brondizio, Eduardo
    Chan, Kai M. A.
    Figueroa, Viviana Elsa
    Duraiappah, Anantha
    Fischer, Markus
    Hill, Rosemary
    Koetz, Thomas
    Leadley, Paul
    Lyver, Philip
    Mace, Georgina M.
    Martin-Lopez, Berta
    Okumura, Michiko
    Pacheco, Diego
    Pascual, Unai
    Perez, Edgar Selvin
    Reyers, Belinda
    Roth, Eva
    Saito, Osamu
    Scholes, Robert John
    Sharma, Nalini
    Tallis, Heather
    Thaman, Randolph
    Watson, Robert
    Yahara, Tetsukazu
    Hamid, Zakri Abdul
    Akosim, Callistus
    Al-Hafedh, Yousef
    Allahverdiyev, Rashad
    Amankwah, Edward
    Asah, Stanley T.
    Asfaw, Zemede
    Bartus, Gabor
    Brooks, L. Anathea
    Caillaux, Jorge
    Dalle, Gemedo
    Darnaedi, Dedy
    Driver, Amanda
    Erpul, Gunay
    Escobar-Eyzaguirre, Pablo
    Failler, Pierre
    Fouda, Ali Moustafa Mokhtar
    Fu, Bojie
    Gundimeda, Haripriya
    Hashimoto, Shizuka
    Homer, Floyd
    Lavorel, Sandra
    Lichtenstein, Gabriela
    Mala, William Armand
    Mandivenyi, Wadzanayi
    Matczak, Piotr
    Mbizvo, Carmel
    Mehrdadi, Mehrasa
    Metzger, Jean Paul
    Mikissa, Jean Bruno
    Moller, Henrik
    Mooney, Harold A.
    Mumby, Peter
    Nagendra, Harini
    Nesshover, Carsten
    Oteng-Yeboah, Alfred Apau
    Pataki, Gyoergy
    Roue, Marie
    Rubis, Jennifer
    Schultz, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Smith, Peggy
    Sumaila, Rashid
    Takeuchi, Kazuhiko
    Thomas, Spencer
    Verma, Madhu
    Yeo-Chang, Youn
    Zlatanova, Diana
    The IPBES Conceptual Framework - connecting nature and people2015In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 14, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first public product of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) is its Conceptual Framework. This conceptual and analytical tool, presented here in detail, will underpin all IPBES functions and provide structure and comparability to the syntheses that IPBES will produce at different spatial scales, on different themes, and in different regions. Salient innovative aspects of the IPBES Conceptual Framework are its transparent and participatory construction process and its explicit consideration of diverse scientific disciplines, stakeholders, and knowledge systems, including indigenous and local knowledge. Because the focus on co-construction of integrative knowledge is shared by an increasing number of initiatives worldwide, this framework should be useful beyond IPBES, for the wider research and knowledge-policy communities working on the links between nature and people, such as natural, social and engineering scientists, policy-makers at different levels, and decision-makers in different sectors of society.

  • 2.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Cornell, Sarah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Öhman, Marcus C.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Daw, Tim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Moberg, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Norström, Albert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Persson, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Peterson, Garry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Schultz, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hermansson Török, Ellika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Global sustainability & human prosperity: contribution to the Post-2015 agenda and the development of Sustainable Development Goals2014Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Hahn, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    McDermott, Constance
    Ituarte-Lima, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Schultz, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Green, Tom
    Tuvendal, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Purposes and degrees of commodification: Economic instruments for biodiversity and ecosystem services need not rely on markets or monetary valuation2015In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 16, p. 74-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commodification of nature refers to the expansion of market trade to previously non-marketed spheres. This is a contested issue both in the scientific literature and in policy deliberations. The aim of this paper is to analytically clarify and distinguish between different purposes and degrees of commodification and to focus attention to the safeguards: the detailed institutional design. We identify six degrees of commodification and find that all ecosystem services policies are associated with some degree of commodification but only the two highest degrees can properly be associated with neoliberalisation of nature. For example, most payments for ecosystem services (PES) are subsidy-like government compensations not based on monetary valuation of nature. Biodiversity offsets can be designed as market schemes or non-market regulations; the cost-effectiveness of markets cannot be assumed. To avoid the confusion around the concept 'market-based instrument' we suggest replacing it with 'economic instruments' since relying on the price signal is not the same thing as relying on the market. We provide a comprehensive framework emphasising the diversity in institutional design, valuation approaches and role of markets. This provides flexibility and options for policy integration of biodiversity and ecosystem services in different countries according to their political and cultural context.

  • 4.
    Schultz, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hahn, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Ituarte-Lima, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hällström, Niclas
    Deliberative multi-actor dialogues as opportunities for transformative social learning and conflict resolution in international environmental negotiations2018In: International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, ISSN 1567-9764, E-ISSN 1573-1553, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 671-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The format for formal international negotiations on environment and development sometimes prevents negotiators from truly listening to each other and adapt pre-existing positions to realize constructive conflict resolution. In this paper we present and analyse Multi-Actor Dialogue Seminars (MADS) as an approach to contribute to transformative social learning and conflict resolution, and the contribution to tangible and intangible outcomes in formal negotiations. Unlike negotiations, the objective of MADS is not to agree on a text, but to identify areas of agreement and disagreement, build trust and understanding and identify policy options that are tailored to different cultural-political and value systems. As a case study we use the breakdown of the negotiations at the formal Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)Conference in 2010 regarding innovative financial mechanisms, and subsequent two international Quito Dialogues using the MADS approach. Through a composite of methods this article reveals the effects of the Quito Dialogues on formal CBD negotiations. The Quito Dialogues contributed to bringing actors out of their deadlock and thereby paving the way for constructive results in the formal CBD negotiations, evident by references in CBD Decisions adopted by 196 CBD Parties. We discuss key design and implementation factors which were decisive for these effects including the importance of a bridging organization, trust building, exploration of both convergences and divergences, involvement of participants with diverse and conflicting views early in the planning, promotion of active listening and addressing diverse knowledge systems and power asymmetries.

  • 5. Sumaila, U. Rashid
    et al.
    Rodriguez, Carlos Manuel
    Schultz, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sharma, Ravi
    Tyrrell, Tristan D.
    Masundire, Hillary
    Damodaran, A.
    Bellot-Rojas, Mariana
    Rosales, Rina Maria P.
    Jung, Tae Yong
    Hickey, Valerie
    Solhaug, Tone
    Vause, James
    Ervin, Jamison
    Smith, Sarah
    Rayment, Matt
    Investments to reverse biodiversity loss are economically beneficial2017In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 29, p. 82-88Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reversing biodiversity loss by 2020 is the objective of the 193 countries that are party to the global Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). In this context, the Aichi Biodiversity Targets 2020 were agreed upon by the CBD in Nagoya, Japan in 2010 and this was followed by asking a high-level panel to make an assessment of the financial resources needed to achieve these targets globally. First, we review the literature on the costs and benefits of meeting the Aichi Targets. Second, we provide a summary of the main conclusions of the CBD High-Level Panel (HLP) 1 and 2 on the Global Assessment of the Resources for Implementing the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020. A key conclusion of the HLP is that the monetary and non-monetary benefits of biodiversity conservation and sustainable use to be achieved by implementing the Aichi Targets would significantly outweigh the amount of investments required.

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