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  • 1. McCormack, Donna
    et al.
    Bould, Mark
    Bugge, Liv
    Davies, Surekha
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Weinstock, Jeffrey
    Monster Talk: A Virtual Roundtable with Mark Bould, Liv Bugge, Surekha Davies, Margrit Shildrick and Jeffrey [Edited by Donna McCormack]2018In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 248-268Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This roundtable brings together scholars and artists working with the monster and the monstrous. It took place between December 2017 and June 2018 via email. Participants responded to an initial email question from me, and then to each other's responses, along with framing questions from me. The ‘temporality, polyvocality, and virtual space of this roundtable’ (Dinshaw et al. 2007: 177) evokes this roundtable's indebtedness to scholars in the fields of queer and critical ethnic studies, as well as bringing to the fore the monstrous in its unstable and individually collective form. I am grateful to the invitees who came to the table and shared their time and thoughts.

  • 2.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies. Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, Finland.
    Body Shock: Unsettling the Biosciences Through Postconventional Materialities2019In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 206-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is the problematic of data in the life sciences with regard to the supposedly singular event of heart transplantation. In mainstream discourse, organ transplantation is seen as a straightforward exchange of body parts in which fatally deteriorating biological elements are replaced by more competent and enduring components. Post-transplant a variety of biological, immunological, and pharmaceutical data are collected and evaluated, with the success of the operation gauged against the clinical recovery of the recipient as determined by those measures. That simple picture fails to attend, however, to issues such as the historicocultural context of the biomedical procedure, temporality, the phenomenological sense of self, the psycho-social imaginary, and even disregarded biological dimensions such as cellular microchimerism, all of which can deeply unsettle biomedical certainty. Drawing on my own participation in collaborative research, I rethink what counts as data and demonstrate the need to interweave multiple forms of knowledge in a data assemblage that mobilises new insights into the significance of transplantation and concorporeality.

  • 3.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
    (Micro)chimerism, Immunity and Temporality: Rethinking the Ecology of Life and Death2019In: Australian feminist studies (Print), ISSN 0816-4649, E-ISSN 1465-3303, Vol. 34, no 99, p. 10-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent upsurge of interest in the co-articulation of biopolitical and bioethical entanglements underpin both a concern for the putatively temporal thresholds of human life and the very conception of a bounded humanity itself. Taking a step further, I want to suggest that micro(chimerism) as a very specific form of somatic multiplicity, read together with the contemporary rethinking of the concept of immunity, instantiates a fundamental disordering of linear temporality. And that in turn calls for a further reconceptualisation of conventional bioethics. I acknowledge the force of an existing postmodernist bioethics that has attended to the materiality and viscerality of the body and challenged the meaning of human being but, until recently, it has not addressed the bookends of life and death. Once the teleology of the life course is contested, however, death is no longer an insult to being, but merely one event constituting an ongoing vitalism. I propose an atemporal bioethics of coexistence rather than one of successive existence that is faced always with its own finitude.

  • 4.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies. York University, Canada.
    Neoliberalism and Embodied Precarity: Some Crip Responses2019In: The South Atlantic Quarterly, ISSN 0038-2876, E-ISSN 1527-8026, Vol. 118, no 3, p. 595-613Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
    Visual Rhetorics and the Seductions of the Monstrous: Some Precautionary Observations2018In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 163-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What does it mean to look at the monstrous? For many people, monstrous embodiment in its many forms arouses discomfort that is more or less successfully managed through the medium of our differential senses. While the creation of an interval between self and other through sight and representation allows for a reassuring self-security, there is also the sense of a certain destabilising 'yuk' factor present. Yet, our persistent fascination with the monstrous speaks to a profound longing that may manifest not just in curiosity about the strange, but as a form of desire. In critical cultural studies, the complications of Freudian and Lacanian desire clearly provide a platform for understanding the seductiveness of the monstrous, but are now more often surpassed by the celebration of a reconfigured and wholly positive desire in its Deleuzian sense. At the same time our longing for the monstrous denotes a desire for the grasp of knowledge and for the domestication of anomaly. As such I want to expand on the familiar uneasiness that showing images of the monstrous potentially provokes and its putative encouragement of an undoubted voyeurism, to engage instead with a Derridean exhortation to preserve the strangeness, and with an reparative reading through Deleuze that offers reasons to be hopeful.

  • 6.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Holm, Marie-Louise
    Before the Cut: Rethinking Genital Identity2018In: Body, Migration, Re/constructive Surgeries: Making the Gendered Body in a Globalized World / [ed] Gabriele Griffin, Malin Jordal, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 272-287Chapter in book (Refereed)
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