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  • 1.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    City University of Hong Kong, People's Republic of China.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English as an academic language at a Swedish university: parallel language use and the 'threat' of English2012In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 429-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, universities across Europe have increasingly adopted the use of English as an academic lingua franca. Our article discusses current trends in Swedish higher education by presenting the results of a large-scale survey on the use of English conducted at Stockholm University. The survey involved 668 staff and 4524 students and focused on the use of English for academic purposes and students’ and teachers’ attitudes to English as a medium of instruction. The results indicate that complex patterns of academic English use emerge, which are related to the specific discipline studied, the level of instruction (undergraduate versus Master's) and the receptive versus productive use of English. They also indicate that in the sciences the use of English is a pragmatic reality for both teachers and students, whereas in the humanities and social sciences, English is typically used as an additional or auxiliary language in parallel with Swedish.

  • 2.
    Garcia-Yeste, Miguel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Verhagen, Harko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Learning to disseminate Computer Science: Who is the real expert here?2013In: The 2013 Swedish Symposium for LSP / LAP: Investigating relationships between teaching, learning, and research, 2013, p. 5-5Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers who obtain external funding for their projects are increasingly under pressure to make their findings available to the general public (Wilson, 2003). In fact, dissemination is a recurring aim in most calls for applications from national and European funding agencies. In this context, being able to produce popularised texts has become a much needed skill to progress in academia and to communicate in professional contexts. Traditionally, popularisation has been seen as unidirectional and hierarchical. Researchers and science journalists were considered to be the source of information for their lay audiences (Corbett, 2006) and expert knowledge had to be “translated” for the general public. However, other voices claim that, in some cases, the public’s expertise may be higher than expected (Myers, 2003), which might call for a different approach to the popularisation of science. Thus, there is a need for more research in this field and for the development of teaching strategies and materials aimed at improving researchers’ skills in popularisation. Computer Science, with its wide range of specialisations, provides an interesting case for this kind of research. We have found that in some areas within this discipline, the boundaries between the experts and the general public are sometimes unclear, and lowering the level of technicality may not always be the best approach. Our study aims to explore the rhetorical and multimodal strategies used in academic and popularised publications, particularly in relation to the construction of the author’s identity and to the establishment of a social relation with the audience. Our data include academic and outreach texts written by the same authors. Both academic and popularisation texts deal with the same topics, so as to ensure alignment in the data analysis. The samples also include new media in the form of videos. Thus, our study seeks to identify different strategies used in the context of popularised publications in cases where the boundaries between the expert and the lay audience are not so clear. Our findings suggest that using a contrastive approach to the teaching of academic versus popular writing can contribute to the development of genre awareness and rhetorical flexibility for different audiences. Learning to write on the same subject in different genres encourages students to develop their own voices and to better position themselves and their research in different contexts. To conclude, we present some pedagogical applications.

  • 3.
    Garcia-Yeste, Miguel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Verhagen, Harko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The public footprint of ICT pervasiveness: who is the real expert here?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Hynninen, Niina
    et al.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Good and acceptable English in L2 research writing: Ideals and realities in history and computer science2017In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 30, p. 53-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of the recent developments on the international publishing scene, increasingly dominated by L2 writers of English, the question of what is considered to be good and acceptable English calls for further research. This paper examines in what ways researchers describe the English used for research writing in their field. Interview data were collected from historians and computer scientists working in Finland and Sweden. Our analysis points towards some differences in the way researchers perceive good writing in English in their field, and what they themselves report to practice as (co-)authors, readers/reviewers, and proofreaders. The discrepancy between the ideals and realities of research writing in English was clear in the case of the historians. Our findings suggest that in research writing for publication, there is a pull towards some form of standard norm. This standard can be jointly negotiated during the writing, reviewing, and proofreading process. It may also develop in different directions in different disciplines, but it is likely to be based on the principles of understandability and clarity.

  • 5.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    A Scholar’s Guide to Getting Published in English2015In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 17, p. 77-78Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Academic English as “nobody’s land": The research and publication practices of Swedish academics2015In: English as a scientific and research language: Debates and discourses. English in Europe, Volume 2 / [ed] R. Pló Alastrué and C. Pérez-Llantada, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2015, p. 261-280Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume examines the role of English in academic and research settings in Europe and provides recommendations on the challenges posed by the dominance of English over national languages as languages of science and research dissemination; the need for language support for academics that need to disseminate their research in English; and the effect of past and present language policies.

  • 7.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Academic English in parallel-language and ELF settings2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Book review: Doiz, Aintzane, Lasagabaster, David, and Sierra, Juan Manuel (Eds.). English Medium Instruction at Universities: Global Challenges (Multilingual Matters Series: 149).  Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-84769-815-52014In: Journal of English as a Lingua Franca, ISSN 2191-9216, E-ISSN 2191-933X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 215-219Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Completing tasks for online fora:: a look through the students’ eyes.2006In: Proceedings of the 5th International AELFE Conference / [ed] Pérez-Llantada, C. et al., Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza , 2006, p. 613-623Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Cross-cultural factors in the teaching of ESP for Accounting in Portugal: Some implications of a content-based approach2006In: Proceedings of the 5th International AELFE Conference / [ed] Pérez-Llantada, C. et al., Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza , 2006, p. 300-307Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English in Academic and Professional Contexts2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Nordic Journal of English Studies explores a number of themes related to the spread of English as a global language in academic and professional domains.

  • 12.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English in academic and professional contexts: Editorial2013In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Nordic Journal of English Studies explores a number of themes related to the spread of English as a global language in academic and professional domains. This spread is closely linked to global trends in technological development, population mobility,transnational business organization, and education, which is increasinglydriven by market forces and neo-liberal ideologies. The papers published in this special issue reflect the current status of English in academic and professional contexts, above all as a lingua franca of international communication in science, education, and business.

  • 13.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    European perspectives on second language writing pedagogy2018In: The TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching / [ed] John I. Liontas, John Wiley & Sons, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Fostering intercultural learning through wikis: A Portuguese-Lithuanian experience2008In: Researching and teaching specialized languages: New contexts, new challenges / [ed] Sánchez-Hernandez, P. et al., Murcia: Editum, Universidad de Murcia , 2008, p. 530-542Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    From contrastive rhetoric to English as a lingua franca: An interview with Anna Mauranen2012In: Ibérica, ISSN 1139-7241, E-ISSN 2340-2784, Vol. 24, p. 283-292Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    George Yule. The Study of Language, 2nd edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.1997In: ManuScript: the peer-reviewed journal in English and American Studies at The University of Manchester, ISSN 1360-3140, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 74-75Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Graduate learners’ approaches to genre-analysis tasks: Variations across and within four disciplines2013In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 84-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genre-based approaches are widely used in academic writing courses for graduate students. Yet, despite numerous studies of academic discourses and genres, there is still little research focusing on the learner in ESP genre-based instruction, and further consideration of individual learners’ responses to genre pedagogy is needed. This paper reports on a study conducted at a multi-disciplinary humanities faculty. It examines graduate learners’ approaches to “examine-and-report-back” genre-analysis tasks by comparing thirty-two students from four disciplines: archaeology, history, literature, and media studies. The data are subjected to qualitative analysis inspired by the constant comparative method. The overview of features in students’ genre-analysis tasks across the four disciplines is illustrated with excerpts from student writing. Graduate learners’ approaches to genre-analysis fall into two categories: descriptive and analytical. It is shown that graduate learners’ approaches to genre-analysis tasks vary depending on individual students’ capacity to analyse academic texts in relation to their purpose, audience, and disciplinary practices. Another possible factor impacting this variation includes the extent of learners’ understanding of disciplinary knowledge-making practices.  Finally, students’ own aims and learning histories affect the way they approach genre-analysis tasks.

  • 18.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    University of Manchester, Department of English and American Studies.
    Laurence Coupe, Myth. London and New York: Routledge, 1997.2000In: ANTROPOlógicas, ISSN 0873-819X, no 4, p. 257-258Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Learner perceptions of online collaboration across cultures: Using wikis in ESP Courses in Portugal and in Sweden2010In: Professional English in the European Context: The EHEA Challenge / [ed] Linde-López, A. and Crespo-Jiménez, R., Bern: Peter Lang , 2010, p. 55-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Learning a language while running a business2005In: Languages for Academic and Professional Purposes in the 21st-century University Framework / [ed] Curado, A. et al., Cáceres: Universidad de Extremadura , 2005, p. 379-390Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Myth2000In: Reading the Classics with C.S. Lewis / [ed] Martin, Thomas, Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Academic , 2000, p. 265-285Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    "Mythonomer": Tolkien on myth in his scholarly work2015In: From clerks to corpora: essays on the English language yesterday and today: essays in honour of Nils-Lennart Johannesson / [ed] Philip Shaw, Britt Erman, Gunnel Melchers, Peter Sundkvist, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2015, p. 215-228Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    "Old Human" or "the voice in our hearts": J.R.R. Tolkien on the origin of language1998In: Between Faith and Fiction / [ed] Agøy, Nils Ivar, Uppsala: Arda , 1998, p. 72-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Raising genre awareness and enhancing writing skills in English for Academic and Research Purposes: Making use of ICT2010In: The 9th International Conference of the European Association of Languages for Specific Purposes: Linguistic and Didactic Aspects of Language in Business Communication / [ed] Theo Bungarten, Hamburg: Universität Hamburg , 2010, p. 1-9Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Research blogs, wikis, and tweets2016In: The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw, London: Routledge, 2016, p. 433-445Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Researching English-medium instruction at Swedish universities: Developments over the past decade2018In: English-medium instruction from an English as a Lingua Franca Perspective:: Exploring the Higher Education Context / [ed] Kumiko Murata, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, p. 46-63Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Revisiting the 'E' in EMI: students' perceptions of standard English, lingua franca and translingual practices2019In: International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0050, E-ISSN 1747-7522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conceptualizations of English as standard, as a lingua franca, or as part of translingual practice form part of the discourses surrounding its use in EMI. While researchers generally agree that the 'E' in EMI should not stand for native varieties of standard English, the stakeholders' perceptions of English call for further research. This paper addresses this gap by examining students' conceptualizations of English in an EMI programme at a Swedish university. Drawing on interview data collected from local and international students, the analysis focuses on students' conceptualizations of English in connection to their positionings. The analysis shows that all three above-mentioned conceptualizations are present. The tensions in the students' conceptualizations of English and positionings point towards issues related to power relations, group dynamics, social integration, and learning. The analysis shows that translingual practices in EMI contexts are not always associated with empowering the students by allowing them to resort to their L1s to fill gaps in their English. Translanguaging can also function as a mechanism of exclusion and reinforcement of language standards by a group of 'elite' translinguals. The idea of what is acceptable English in EMI is not static and can move along the standard - non-standard continuum.

  • 28.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    University of Manchester, Department of English and American Studies.
    Scholarship and Mythopoeia: The ideas of language and myth in the works of Owen Barfield, C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines the views adopted by Barfield, Lewis and Tolkien on the phenomena of language and myth as discussed in their academic writing and fiction. Part I (Chapters I and II) focuses on the study of language. The ideas of Barfield, Lewis and Tolkien are examined and compared to those of a number of nineteenth-century predecessors such as Schlegel, Grimm, Müller, Wright and others. Part II (Chapters II, IV and V) similarly deals with myth. The comparative analysis in Chapter V also takes into account some twentieth-century theories of myuth such as those developed by Cassirer, Eliade and Jung. Part III (Chapter VI) is largely dedicated to the discussion of the origins and nature of language and myth in the creative works of Lewis and Tolkien, although one of Barfield's non-theoretical works is also examined. The final chapter draws a links between schlarship and mythopoeia as practiced by the three authors. Overall, the three Inklings are considered as part of a twentieth-century academic tradition that moves away from posivitism, which allies them with the Romantic movement.

  • 29.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Teaching and learning in English in parallel-language and ELF settings: Debates, concerns and realities in higher education2011In: Ibérica, ISSN 1139-7241, E-ISSN 2340-2784, Vol. 22, p. 5-12Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The parallel language use of Swedish and English: The question of “nativeness” in university policies and practices2014In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 332-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a result of internationalisation, many universities in northern Europe have adopted English as a medium of instruction. At the same time, recent language policies have reinforced the importance of the national language(s) in the academic domain. Parallel language use was introduced and institutionalised in order to ensure students’ right to receive education in their native language and to protect the national language(s) from the ‘threat’ of English. In this article, I discuss the concept of parallel language use and the extent to which it promotes ‘nativeness’ as a benchmark for language use in educational contexts. Drawing on the data collected at a major Swedish university, I show that the development of academic literacy in English is often mistaken for a need to achieve a native-like proficiency. I argue that academic language competence requires both more and less than a native/native-like competence. Thus, academics and students at Swedish universities may be mixing apples and pears and setting unrealistic goals regarding English proficiency in academic contexts, based on the standard native English norms.

  • 31.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The role of online collaboration in fostering learner independence in ESP2007In: Aprender ensinando: dinamicas metodológicas no ensino-aprendizagem das línguas estrangeiras : actas do VIII encontro da aprolíngüas / [ed] María del Carmen Arau Ribeiro, Elisabete Batoco Constante de Brito, Guadalupe Aria Méndez, Guarda: E.S.T.G.I.P. (Escola Superior da Tecnologia e Gestão do Instituto Politécnico da Guarda) , 2007, p. 97-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The use of online fora in language teaching: The importance of task design2007In: IADIS International Conference Proceedings: E-Learning / [ed] Miguel Baptista Nunes and Maggie McPherson, 2007, p. 305-308Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses various ways in which online fora have been used in language teaching, focusing particularly on task design. Different studies reviewed here suggest that free online discussion cannot be relied on to achieve educational goals such as a collaborative construction of knowledge. When learners write in a foreign language, task design plays a fundamental role in fostering learning and collaboration. Following a review of previous research, this paper singles out the main factors to be considered in task design for online fora in language teaching.

  • 33.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Manchester University, Department of English and American Studies.
    The Ways of Creative Mythologies: Imagined Worlds and Their Makers2000Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This edition contains contributions from fifteen scholars including Tom Shippey, Laurence Coupe, Patrick Curry, and Chris Garbowki. The papers are divided into four sections: 'Myth, Nationalism and Ideology', 'Myth, Modernity and Postmodernity', 'Mythic Imagination', and 'Myth in Contemporary Culture'.

  • 34.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Tolkien and Lewis on language in their scholarly work2013In: Of butterflies and birds, of dialects and genres: Essays in honour of Philip Shaw / [ed] Nils-Lennart Johannesson, Gunnel Melchers, and Beyza Björkman, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 305-324Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares Tolkien’s and Lewis’s views on language as expressed in their scholarly work. I show that Tolkien’s approach to the study of language is, above all, that of a comparative philologist. In particular, he shares many ideas with the initiators of the science of language, Bopp, Rask and Grimm, who studied languages in close relation to their literature and history. Tolkien also continues the tradition of “imaginative scholarship”, but separates his scholarly investigations from his philological imagination. Lewis largely remains an amateur in the area of language study. On the one hand, he appears to be influenced by Barfield and Tolkien, but on the other, he holds on to his own views with regard to metaphor and meaning. His interest in the study of language derives from the professional need of a literary historian, and his inspiration to write about words arises from ‘moralistic purposes’. In the context of the twentieth century, the two Inklings’ views appear to be anti-positivist. The interest taken by Barfield, Tolkien, and, to a certain extent, Lewis, in the beginnings of language and its association with poetry and myth allies them with a number of nineteenth-century language scholars.

  • 35.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Wikis and academic writing: changing the writer-reader relationship2011In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 44-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of information and communication technologies has resulted in the emergence of new kinds of academic genres and literacies. The more recent social web applications empower learners to create online content in a collaborative way. This paper focuses on the use of wikis in the course of Effective Communication in English. It aims to describe how the course wiki was used to teach writing for academic and professional purposes, and to analyse what impact using the wiki had on the writer–reader relationship. The case study employed several research techniques, including participant observation, text analysis and a self-report questionnaire. The texts published by students on the wiki were examined for reader-oriented features and interactional metadiscourse resources. The results indicate that using the wiki for writing activities made students pay close attention to grammatical correctness and structural coherence. Nearly 60% of the students reported that writing on the wiki made them consider their audience. The extent of the writer–reader interaction was further confirmed by a high use of engagement markers in the argumentative texts. Thus, writing on the wiki can contribute to raising awareness of the audience and to increasing the use of interpersonal metadiscourse.

  • 36.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Written ELF and EAP Instruction: A North European Perspective2017In: Waseda Working Papers in ELF / [ed] Kumiko Murata, Mayu Konakahara, Tokyo: Waseda University , 2017, p. 40-55Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Airey, John
    Disciplinary differences in the use of English in higher education: Reflections on recent language policy developments2014In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 67, no 5, p. 533-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In post-Bologna Europe, there has been a noticeable increase in English-medium instruction. In this article we take the case of Sweden as an illustrative example of the wider disciplinary issues involved in changing the teaching language in this way. By 2008 the use of English in Swedish higher education had risen to such an extent that it had to be regulated at the governmental level and through university language policies. Such policies have attempted to provide generalised pragmatic guidelines for language use across educational programmes. In this paper we argue that such general policies fail to take into consideration fundamental disciplinary differences and their potential impact on language use. We present a theoretical argument about the knowledge structures of disciplines, relating these to the disciplinary literacy goals of educational programmes. We then illustrate our argument using data from an extensive survey carried out at a major Swedish university. We conclude that the disciplinary variation in the use of English can be seen as a product of different knowledge-making practices and educational goals. This conclusion problematises “one-size-fits-all” language policies which only deal with general features of language use and do not allow for discipline-specific adjustments.

  • 38.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Hynninen, Niina
    Haslam, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    “It’s so natural to mix languages”: Attitudes towards English-medium instruction in Sweden2015In: Attitudes towards English in Europe: English in Europe, Volume 1 / [ed] A. Linn, N. Bermel, G. Ferguson and C. Hadjidemetriou, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2015, p. 193-202Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Martins, Helder F.
    Teaching and Learning LSP: Blurring Boundaries2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mauranen, Anna
    Digital academic discourse: Texts and contexts2018In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 24, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Special Issue focuses on how digital media – blogs, tweets, and other digital platforms – are used by researchers, and how these new modes of academic communication have impacted writing practices and language uses in the academy. It brings together research in two related areas of scholarship: academic discourse analysis and literacies research. In this introductory article, we first outline the concept of digital academic discourse as we perceive it in the context of our Special Issue and show how it is related to, and at the same time different from, its “analogue” predecessor. We then continue to discuss the practices surrounding the production of academic texts with the support of digital media, followed by an outline of how both digital academic discourse and related writing practices are tied to the networks, communities and spaces in which they take place. Next, methodological issues in the study of digital academic discourse are considered, and the articles in this special issue are presented in connection to the themes outlined above. We conclude by contextualising the studies reported here within current trends in discourse analytical and sociolinguistic research and identify venues for future studies.

  • 41.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mauranen, Anna
    Helsinki University.
    Writing for publication in multilingual contexts2014In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 13, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    McGrath, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Taming Tyrannosaurus rex: English use in the research and publication practices of humanities scholars in Sweden2014In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communiciation, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 33, no 3/4, p. 365-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the current position of English in the language ecology8 of Swedish academia, with a special focus on the humanities. Semi-structured interviews with 15 informants from the fields of Anthropology, General Linguistics and History were carried out to explore how non-native speakers of English experience using academic English in their research. In contrast to other recent findings, our study shows that while some differences along disciplinary lines emerged, on the whole, English does not pose a significant challenge for scholars when writing for publication. Furthermore, our informants do not perceive themselves to be disadvantaged by their non-native status. The study casts some doubt on Swales’ well-known dinosaur metaphor; while English does in deed dominate in the sphere of international publication in terms of production, multilingual research practices are evident within the research and publication process.

  • 43.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    McGrath, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The theoretical research article as a reflection of disciplinary practices: The case of pure mathematics2015In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 215-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen an interest in the generic structure of empirical research articles across a variety of disciplines. However, significantly less attention has been given to theoretical articles. This study aims to begin to address this imbalance by presenting the results of an investigation into the organizational and rhetorical structure of theoretical pure mathematics research articles. The data set combines a close analysis of 22 peer-reviewed articles and semi-structured interviews with their authors. While there is considerable variation in terms of the major section headings and content, the results reveal an overall structure that differs from a typical empirical research article. We argue that this alternative structure is produced by the dual argumentation—mathematical and meta-mathematical—which runs throughout the text. Moreover, triangulation with the interview data indicates that the structural patterns of the theoretical pure mathematics research article can be viewed as a reflection of the research practices and epistemology of the discipline.

  • 44.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Negretti, Raffaella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Graduate students' genre knowledge and perceived disciplinary practices: Creating a research space across disciplines2016In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 41, p. 36-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disciplinary differences in academic writing have been addressed in applied linguistics from multiple perspectives. This article focuses on the rhetorical strategies used by multilingual graduate students from the sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities to create a research space in academic introductions. Adopting an in-depth qualitative approach, we draw on three data sources: graduate learners' analyses of model texts, their reflections on their own writing strategies, and a textual analysis of their introductions, to better understand how genre knowledge is connected to perceived disciplinary practices. Our findings indicate that the students' formal and rhetorical knowledge of genre is linked to their perception of knowledge-making practices in their respective disciplines. We discuss pedagogical implications for EAP professionals working with students from different disciplines in multilingual contexts.

  • 45.
    McGrath, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Stance and engagement in pure mathematics research articles: Linking discourse features to disciplinary practices2012In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 161-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent ESP research into academic writing has shown how writers convey their stance and interact with readers across different disciplines. However, little research has been carried out into the disciplinary writing practices of the pure mathematics academic community from an ESP genre analysis perspective. This study begins to address this gap by applying Hyland’s stance and engagement framework to pure mathematics research articles. The data consists of a corpus of 25 articles collected from five authors and semi-structured interviews with the same authors. The results of the corpus analysis reveal a low number of hedges and attitude markers compared to other hard and soft disciplines, but higher than expected shared knowledge and reader references. Furthermore, triangulation with interview data suggests that the epistemology and research practices of the discourse community can account for these frequency patterns, and that writers are conscious of the need to situate oneself within the norms of the discourse community by adhering to disciplinary writing conventions. The study also confirms that Hyland’s framework can be usefully applied to pure mathematics research articles, although the boundaries between categories in the taxonomy are fuzzier than a stance/engagement dichotomy might suggest.

  • 46.
    Negretti, Raffaella
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Fostering metacognitive genre awareness in L2 academic reading and writing: a case study of pre-service English teachers2011In: Journal of second language writing, ISSN 1060-3743, E-ISSN 1873-1422, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 95-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the concept of metacognition has received considerable attention for its impact on learning across disciplinary areas, it has not been sufficiently discussed in the context of L2 academic reading and writing. In this paper, we bring together two theoretical frameworks, genre analysis and metacognition theory, and discuss the concept of metacognitive genre awareness. Drawing on the analysis of the data collected from a group of pre-service English teachers at a major Swedish university, we examine the process of building this awareness within ESP genre-based academic reading and writing instruction and show how it influences L2 students’ ability to interpret and compose academic texts. It was found that all study participants developed declarative (what) and procedural (how) metacognitive knowledge of genre-relevant aspects of academic texts, but only a few demonstrated conditional (when and why) knowledge of the genre in their reading analyses and writing assignments. It is concluded that using a metacognition framework to study L2 academic writing provides us with new insights and practical applications for L2 instruction.

  • 47.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Okamura, Akiko
    Submission letters for academic publication : Disciplinary differences and promotional language2014In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 14, p. 106-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the occluded genres in academic publishing is the submission letter that accom-panies a journal article. Research from the 1990s shows that a wide range of disciplinespreferred a simple, concise and modest form. The genre has survived the transition toelectronic publishing, and a number of publications by authorities with editorial experi-ence have recommended a more promotional discourse. This suggests that the submissionletter may have undergone the‘marketization’process often noted in academic genres.This article reports a study of the published requirements of journals in various disciplines,the perceptions of senior researchers, and the practices of three informants over the lasttwenty years. Wefind little evidence that marketized discourse has actually spread in thisgenre since the 1990s. Competitivefields, primarily biomedicine, used a promotionaldiscourse as early as 1988, and have continued to do so, and others were more modest atthat time, and have not changed. Editorial pressures and standardization of submissionrequirements might cause change in the expected direction.Our pedagogical recommendation is that the genre matters in some disciplines, and thatits rhetoric has to be discipline-appropriate. More generally the results confirm theimportance of discipline-specific conventions, even in occluded genres.

  • 48.
    Soler, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    University language policies in Estonia and Sweden: Exploring the interplay between English and national languages in higher education2018In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 29-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As universities seek to become more international, their need to engage with a wider range of languages, particularly English, seems more prominent. At the same time, universities are also regarded by many stakeholders as key institutions to preserve a given national language and culture. This apparent tension makes universities a fruitful ground to explore relevant issues of language policymaking. This paper analyses language policies in higher education in two northern European countries, Sweden and Estonia. Applying qualitative content analytical tools, we tackle the following questions: (1) what major themes emerge from the analysis of institutional language policy documents in Estonia and Sweden? and (2) how is English perceived in relation to other languages? Our analysis shows that, despite their different historical and sociopolitical trajectories, universities in the two countries tend to adopt similar stances vis-à-vis their language policy developments. There also exist, however, different nuances in approaching the language question, which we interpret as being the result of the particular cultural backgrounds of each country.

1 - 48 of 48
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