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  • 1. Bolin, Karl
    et al.
    Kedhammar, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nilsson, Mats E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The influence of background sounds on loudness and annoyance of wind turbine noise2012In: Acta Acoustica united with Acustica, ISSN 1610-1928, E-ISSN 1861-9959, Vol. 98, no 5, p. 741-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural sounds may create pleasant soundscapes that mask wind turbine noise. To explore this, a listening test was performed to investigate the influence of background sounds on perceived loudness and annoyance of wind turbine noise. A magnitude estimation method was used to measure perceived loudness and annoyance of wind turbine noise heard together with and without natural ambient sounds. Results indicate that decreased loudness and annoyance occurs if the level of the background sound exceeds the level of the wind turbine noise. The loudness experiment revealed that ambient sounds influenced the perception of wind turbine noise to a higher degree than predicted from a model of energetic masking. Annoyance ratings were less altered by background sound than perceived loudness. The results of the present listening study indicates that masking of wind turbine noise by positive natural sounds may be used as a complement to conventional noise control measures to improve the sound environment in areas exposed to wind turbine noise.

  • 2.
    Eckerberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Gerger Swartling, Åsa
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Söderberg, C.
    Institutional Analysis of Energy and Agriculture.2007In: Environmental Policy Integration in Practice: Shaping Institutions for Learning., Earthscan, London , 2007, p. 111-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3. Engström, R.
    et al.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Finnveden, Göran
    Which environmental problems get policy attention?: Examining energy and agricultural sector policies in Sweden2008In: Environmental Impact Assessment Review, Vol. 28, no 4/5, p. 241-255Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Eriksson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Nilsson, Mats E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Willers, Saskia M.
    Gidhagen, Lars
    Bellander, Tom
    Pershagen, Goran
    Traffic noise and cardiovascular health in Sweden: the roadside study2012In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 14, no 59, p. 140-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term exposure to traffic noise has been suggested to increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). However, few studies have been performed in the general population and on railway noise. This study aimed to investigate the cardiovascular effects of living near noisy roads and railways. This cross-sectional study comprised 25,851 men and women, aged 18-80 years, who had resided in Sweden for at least 5 years. All subjects participated in a National Environmental Health Survey, performed in 2007, in which they reported on health, annoyance reactions and environmental factors. Questionnaire data on self-reported doctors diagnosis of hypertension and/or CVD were used as outcomes. Exposure was assessed as Traffic Load (millions of vehicle kilometres per year) within 500 m around each participants residential address. For a sub-population (n = 2498), we also assessed road traffic and railway noise in L den at the dwelling facade. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess Prevalence Odds Ratios (POR) and 95 Confidence Intervals (CI). No statistically significant associations were found between Traffic Load and self-reported hypertension or CVD. In the sub-population, there was no association between road traffic noise and the outcomes; however, an increased risk of CVD was suggested among subjects exposed to railway noise >= 50 dB(A); POR 1.55 (95 CI 1.00-2.40). Neither Traffic Load nor road traffic noise was, in this study, associated with self-reported cardiovascular outcomes. However, there was a borderline-significant association between railway noise and CVD. The lack of association for road traffic may be due to methodological limitations.

  • 5.
    Folke, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Jansson, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crépin, Anne-Sophie
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Ebbesson, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law, Stockholm Environmental Law and Policy Centre.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Galaz, Victor
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Moberg, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Albaeco, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
    Persson, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Peterson, Garry
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Steffen, Will
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Walker, Brian
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden; CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems, Canberra, ACT, Australia .
    Reconnecting to the biosphere2011In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 719-738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humanity has emerged as a major force in the operation of the biosphere, with a significant imprint on the Earth System, challenging social-ecological resilience. This new situation calls for a fundamental shift in perspectives, world views, and institutions. Human development and progress must be reconnected to the capacity of the biosphere and essential ecosystem services to be sustained. Governance challenges include a highly interconnected and faster world, cascading social-ecological interactions and planetary boundaries that create vulnerabilities but also opportunities for social-ecological change and transformation. Tipping points and thresholds highlight the importance of understanding and managing resilience. New modes of flexible governance are emerging. A central challenge is to reconnect these efforts to the changing preconditions for societal development as active stewards of the Earth System. We suggest that the Millennium Development Goals need to be reframed in such a planetary stewardship context combined with a call for a new social contract on global sustainability. The ongoing mind shift in human relations with Earth and its boundaries provides exciting opportunities for societal development in collaboration with the biosphere-a global sustainability agenda for humanity.

  • 6.
    Gerger Swartling, Åsa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Social learning and environmental policy integration: Communicative governance in Swedish climate policy formation2007Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Gerger Swartling, Åsa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Engström, R.
    Hagberg, L.
    Theory and Methodology for EPI analysis2007In: Environmental Policy Integration in Practice: Shaping Institutions for Learning, Earthscan, London , 2007, p. 49-65Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8. Hertin, J.
    et al.
    Turnpenny, J.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Nykvist, Björn
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Russel, D.
    Rationalising the policy mess?: Ex ante policy assessment and the utilisation of knowledge in the policy process2009In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 1185-1200Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Höjer, M.
    et al.
    Ahlroth, S.
    Dreborg, K.
    Ekvall, T.
    Finnveden, Göran
    Hjelm, O.
    Hochschorner, E.
    Palm, V.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Scenarios in selected tools for environmental systems analysis2008In: Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol. 16, no 18, p. 1958-1970Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Changing the decision space: European policy influences on energy policy and systems change in Sweden2011In: Public Administration, ISSN 0033-3298, E-ISSN 1467-9299, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 1509-1525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EU takes a growing interest in governing the energy sector in its member states. Competing with national institutions, policies and organizational structures, it is however not clear whether the EU exerts a strong influence compared to other factors, and if there is such an influence, the mechanisms are not well understood. This paper examines strategic reorientation towards electricity investment in the Swedish energy sector, a ‘frontrunner case’ of Europeanization, and discusses how this change can be attributed to EU policy change, national policy change and organizational field developments respectively. It finds that EU energy policy influence has been notable, and that governance mechanisms that shape beliefs and expectations are strongly at play. However, despite growing EU clout on energy policy, field level and national policy change remain key drivers of the changing decision space in the examined time period.

  • 11.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Shaping institutions for learning2007In: Environmental Policy Integration in Practice: Shaping Institutions for Learning, Earthscan, London , 2007, p. 163-168Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Sustainable energy for all: from basic access to a shared development agenda2012In: Carbon Management, ISSN 1758-3004, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Eckerberg, KatarinaStockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Environmental policy integration in practice: Shaping institutions for learning.2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Eckerberg, Katarina
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Finnveden, Göran
    Discussion: What Enabled EPI in Practice?2007In: Environmental Policy Integration in Practice: Shaping Institutions for Learning, Earthscan, London , 2007, p. 137-161Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Eckerberg, Katarina
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Hagberg, L.
    Gerger Swartling, Åsa
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Söderberg, C.
    Policy Framing and EPI in Energy and Agriculture2007In: Environmental Policy Integration in Practice: Shaping Institutions for Learning, Earthscan, London , 2007, p. 85-110Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Eckerberg, Katarina
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Persson, Åsa
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Introduction: EPI agendas and policy2007In: Environmental Policy Integration in Practice: Shaping Institutions for Learning, Earthscan, London , 2007, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Heaps, Charles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Persson, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Carson, Marcus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Energy for a shared development agenda: global scenarios and governance implications2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report combines a global assessment of energy scenarios up to 2050, case studies of energy access and low-carbon efforts around the world, and a review of the technological shifts, investments, policies and governance structures needed to bring energy to all.

    How can the world meet energy needs for human and economic development in a way that is compatible with sustainable development? What is required is nothing less than a massive transformation of energy systems and rapid turnovers of infrastructure and technology, all of which must be achieved while staying within climate and resource constraints.Though the challenge is great, the energy and sustainability scenarios in this report show that it can be met. However, while these scenarios sketch out transformation pathways in broad strokes, the devil is in the detail. This study also explores how to successfully implement change, via case studies of energy transformation and reviews of policy mechanisms and governance frameworks.Over the coming decade, policymakers around the world need to build a shared development agenda to address these challenges. It is hoped that this study will help to lay the foundations for such an effort.

  • 18.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Hillman, Karl
    University of Gävle, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Division for Environmental Strategies Research.
    How do we govern sustainable innovations?: Mapping patterns of governance for biofuels and hybrid-electric vehicle technologies2012In: Environmental innovations and societal transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, Vol. 3, no June 2012, p. 50-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines patterns of governance aimed at sustainable technological innovation in the transport sector. It makes an overall assessment of governance emerging in the fields of biofuel and hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV) technologies, and makes a classification of its characteristics. It examines the role of different actors and levels of governance as well as preferred mechanisms and targets of governance. The assessment reveals that there are rather differential patterns of governance influencing the two fields. For instance, international-level and market-based governance are much more prevalent in biofuels, whereas industry-led and cognitive governance play comparatively stronger roles in HEV. These patterns can be understood in light of both the different institutional and actor characteristics of the two technologies, and their positions in relation to socio-technical regimes.

  • 19.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Hillman, KarlRickne, AnnikaMagnusson, Thomas
    Paving the Road to Sustainable Transport: Governance and innovation in low-carbon vehicles2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Jordan, A.
    Turnpenny, J.
    Herlin, J.
    Nykvist, Björn
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Russel, D.
    The use and non-use of policy appraisal tools in public policy making: an analysis of three European countries and the European Union2008In: Policy Sciences, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 335-355Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Nykvist, Björn
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    The practice of policy assessment in Europe: An institutional and political analysis.2007Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Owens, Susan
    Policy integration for sustainability: notes from a roundtable dialogue2007Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Persson, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Can Earth system interactions be governed?: Governance functions for linking climate change mitigation with land use, freshwater and biodiversity protection2012In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 75, p. 61-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earth system interactions, as highlighted by the planetary boundaries framework, occur within and across natural, social and economic systems and shape global environmental change. This paper addresses the multi-level governance problem of coherently addressing key interactions between four Earth sub-systems - climate change, freshwater use, land use and biodiversity - taking into account concerns over problem shifting. After discussing possibilities for regional downscaling of the boundaries, we explore challenges for the EU region to coherently address this particular set of interacting Earth sub-systems and reduce the risk of problem shifting. This analysis demonstrates that Earth system interactions can be governed, but that they likely require comprehensive packages of governance responses across both sub-systems and levels. Three overarching governance functions are tentatively identified that directly or indirectly address Earth system interactions: reduction of system stress, risks and vulnerabilities; triggering and navigation of transformation of economic activity; and development of a diversity of options. Finally, the paper briefly discusses political and institutional challenges for developing, enabling and stabilising these governance functions.

  • 24.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Persson, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sweden2008In: Innovation in environmental policy?: integrating the environment for sustainability, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2008, p. 224-246Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Rickne, A.
    Governing innovation for sustainable technology: introduction and conceptual basis2012In: Paving the road to sustainable transport: governance and innovation in low-carbon vehicles / [ed] Måns Nilsson et al., Routledge, 2012, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Rickne, A.
    Hillman, K.
    Magnusson, T.
    The road ahead: conclusions and governance implications2012In: Paving the road to sustainable transport: governance and innovation in low-carbon vehicles / [ed] M. Nilsson et al., Routledge, 2012, p. 277-289Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Wiklund, H.
    Finnveden, G.
    Lundberg, K.
    Tyskeng, T.
    Jonsson, D. K.
    Wallgren, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Analytical framework and tool kit for SEA follow up2009In: Environmental impact assessment review, ISSN 0195-9255, E-ISSN 1873-6432, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 186-199Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Zamparutti, Tony
    Petersen, Jan Erik
    Nykvist, Björn
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Rudberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    McGuinn, Jennifer
    Understanding Policy Coherence: Analytical Framework and Examples of Sector–Environment Policy Interactions in the EU2012In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 395-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a framework for analysing policy coherence in a European Union setting through the perspective of policy interaction. Building on a simple policy-analytical approach and theories of institutional interaction, the framework develops a three-step analytical pproach, consisting of the inventory of policy objectives, the screening matrix and a more in-depth analysis of key interactions. Central to the analytical framework is the identification of synergy and conflict at three levels: policy objectives, policy instruments and implementation practices, also taking into account as far as possible outcome and impacts. The paper presents illustrative examples from EU renewable energy and cohesion policies in relation to different environmental policy areas such as biodiversity, habitats, resource efficiency and water. It finds that policies are often coherent at the level of objectives, but that associated instruments and in particular implementation practices cause concern for policy conflict in all three examples. Finally, the paper identifies emerging challenges in the application of policy coherence analysis and a need for further development of the analytical approach.

  • 29.
    Nykvist, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Are impact assessment procedures actually promoting sustainable development? Institutional perspectives on barriers and opportunities found in the Swedish committee system2009In: Environmental impact assessment review, ISSN 0195-9255, E-ISSN 1873-6432, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 15-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impact assessment frameworks are gaining increasing attention as a procedure to integrate sustainability concerns in European and national policy-making. The gap between political visions on sustainable development and the reality of policy-making is, however, still pronounced, and a very limited range and scope of available assessment methods are used in practice. This study examines why this pattern prevails, in this case within the Swedish Committees of Inquiry, with a focus on institutional factors determining the function of Impact Assessments. The findings suggest that assessment procedures have little value when not accompanied by clear specific instructions on priorities. A range of institutional constraints emerge in the interface between policy makers and knowledge providers in committees. Dominant professional, organisational, and disciplinary cultures constrain the assessment, and socio-economic priorities are by tradition most important. Based on our analysis, we conclude that to enhance the potential for integrating sustainability concerns, it seems less fruitful to develop more advanced and complex assessment frameworks and models than strengthening institutional arenas for social learning. Such arenas should be; defined by a broad mandate and instructions, characterised by key personal skills and resources, and build institutional capacity for a range of stakeholders to engage with them.

  • 30.
    Persson, Linn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Persson, Åsa
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Multilateral environmental agreements on the ground: Lessons from supporting implementation of the Montreal Protocol2007Report (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Persson, Åsa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Jonsson, Daniel K.
    Nilsson, Lars J.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Finnveden, Göran
    Kompletterande klimatmål med fokus på sektorsmål2007Report (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Persson, Åsa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Towards a framework for SEA follow-up: Theoretical issues and lessons from policy evaluation2007In: Journal of environmental assessment policy and management, ISSN 1464-3332, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 473-496Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33. Ridder, W. de
    et al.
    Turnpenny, J.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Raggamby, A. von
    A framework for tool selection and use in integrated assessment for sustainable development2007In: Journal of environmental assessment policy and management, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 432-441Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Turnpenny, J.
    et al.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Russel, D.
    Jordan, A.
    Hertin, J.
    Nykvist, Björn
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Why is integrating policy assessment so hard?: A comparative analysis of the institutional capacities and constraints2008In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 759-775Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Varnäs, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Fahnestock, Jesse
    Nykvist, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Chandler, Chelsea
    Erickson, Peter
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Han, Guoyi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Lazarus, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Hallding, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Driving technological innovation for a low-carbon society: case studies for solar photovoltaics and carbon capture and storage2012Report (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Virgin, Ivar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Fagerström, Torbjörn
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Thörn, Eva
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Sundström, Jens
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Barklund, Åke
    Gerremo, Inge
    Herthelius, Peter
    Onödig skepsis mot genmodifierat2012In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 23 MarchArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Vuuren, D.P. van
    et al.
    Utrecht University, Department of Geosciences, The Netherlands.
    Nakicenovic, N.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Riahi, K.
    Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    An energy vision: the transformation towards sustainability — interconnected challenges and solutions2012In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 18-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The energy system is currently facing a number of challenges, most notably high consumption levels, lack of energy access, environmental concerns like climate change and air pollution, energy security concerns and the need for a long-term focus. Addressing these critical issues simultaneously will require a fundamental transformation of the global energy system. Recent assessments show that such transformational pathways are achievable in technological and economic terms, but constitute formidable governance challenges across scales. In this paper, we discuss a long-term vision for the energy system and elements of the transition towards this vision. This transformation would need to be based on several key components, including taking an integrated approach as basis, the focus on high levels of energy efficiency and the scale up of investments, also in RD&D.

  • 38.
    Westley, Frances
    et al.
    Social Innovation Generation, University of Waterloo, Canada.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Galaz, Victor
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Tipping toward sustainability: emerging pathways of transformation2011In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 762-780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the links between agency, institutions, and innovation in navigating shifts and large-scale transformations toward global sustainability. Our central question is whether social and technical innovations can reverse the trends that are challenging critical thresholds and creating tipping points in the earth system, and if not, what conditions are necessary to escape the current lock-in. Large-scale transformations in information technology, nano-and biotechnology, and new energy systems have the potential to significantly improve our lives; but if, in framing them, our globalized society fails to consider the capacity of the biosphere, there is a risk that unsustainable development pathways may be reinforced. Current institutional arrangements, including the lack of incentives for the private sector to innovate for sustainability, and the lags inherent in the path dependent nature of innovation, contribute to lock-in, as does our incapacity to easily grasp the interactions implicit in complex problems, referred to here as the ingenuity gap. Nonetheless, promising social and technical innovations with potential to change unsustainable trajectories need to be nurtured and connected to broad institutional resources and responses. In parallel, institutional entrepreneurs can work to reduce the resilience of dominant institutional systems and position viable shadow alternatives and niche regimes.

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