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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    A New View of the 'Edesö Wreck': identifying the Swedish naval vessel Bodekull, built 1659–1661 and sunk 1678 from written sources2018In: International Journal of Nautical Archaeology, ISSN 1057-2414, E-ISSN 1095-9270, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 391-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article complements the archaeological account of the so-called Edeso Wreck' with archival research that has led to its identification. In 1659 the Swedish King Karl X Gustav ordered a number of vessels for transport of horses and soldiers while at war with Denmark. The king died just a few months later, the war with Denmark was aborted, and the unfinished vessels were rebuilt to serve other purposes. One of these was Bodekull, built under English master shipwright Thomas Day between 1659 and 1661. In October 1678 Bodekull sank in the Stockholm archipelago. Alterations made during construction mentioned in written sources have been noted on the wreck and strengthen the argument for the identification.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Eftermedeltida skeppsvrak: reflektioner kring marinarkeologi och historisk arkeologi med exempel från Östersjö2017In: Nordisk marinarkæologi fast forankret / [ed] Otto Uldum, Morten Sylvester, Rudkøbing: Langelands Museum , 2017, p. 101-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Postmedieval shipwrecks: reflections on maritime archaeology and historical archaeology with examples from the Baltic Sea That the brackish water of the Baltic Sea provides ideal conditions for preservation of organic material is a well-known fact. With this in mind it is a bit surprising just how little archaeological efforts that has been put into surveying these wrecks. The majority of these remains date to the early modern period. The study of these remains are thus associated with the assets as well as problems associated with historical archaeology. This paper reviews some of the research efforts carried out on wrecks in the past with focus on the relationship between history and archaeology. It is argued that the often claimed unique archaeological potential of the Baltic wrecks, tend to become overshadowed by narratives sprung out of written sources. The paper ends with a couple of examples of discussions that are only possible to raise from well-preserved shipwrecks. Inspired by phenomenology and the current research on historical buildings it is argued that ‘the lived experience’ is a possible way forward to raise other questions and to highlight other aspects of the past. The examples discussed are the everyday environment onboard fluits, a very common type of merchant ship, and the famous naval ship Svärdet that went down during a fierce battle in 1676.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Fynden på sjöbottnen utanför Birka2019In: Populär arkeologi, ISSN 0281-014X, no 3, p. 38-38Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gribshunden - det sista drakskeppet?2019In: Gränsløs, ISSN 2001-4961, Vol. 10, p. 11-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gribshunden: medeltidens modernaste skepp2019In: Gribshunden 1495: medeltidens modernaste skepp / [ed] Siiri Irskog, Marcus Sandekjer, Karlskrona: Blekinge museum , 2019, p. 11-40Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Gribshunden: Vraget af kong Hans´skib2019In: Skalk: nyt om gammelt, ISSN 0560-1894, no 2, p. 6-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Heroes, Cowards and Their Shipwrecks: Thoughts on the Maritime Archaelogy of the Scanian War (1675-1679)2019In: On War on Board: Archaeological and historical perspectives on early modern maritime violence and warfare / [ed] Johan Rönnby, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2019, p. 73-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    How Large Was Mars? An investigation of the dimensions of a legendary Swedish warship, 1563–15642019In: Mariner´s mirror, ISSN 0025-3359, E-ISSN 2049-680X, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 260-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish warship Mars was considered to have been one of the largest ships in the world when it exploded and sank in 1564. The problem is that no written accounts clearly reveal its dimensions. This article reviews how different researchers have discussed the size of Mars in the past. It also aims to shed new light on this topic by using information from the archaeological survey carried out at the wreck site since 2011. Even if the result is approximate it clearly shows that Mars was indeed an impressively large ship by sixteenth century standards, but not as large as many previous researchers have thought.

  • 9.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Invasionsfartyget som blev en mjölskuta: identifieringen av ”Dalarövraket” som strussen Bodekull (1661-1678)2018In: Forum navale, ISSN 0280-6215, E-ISSN 2002-0015, no 74, p. 12-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2003 a well preserved shipwreck was discovered north of Dalarö in the Stockholm Archipelago. Artefacts indicated that the ship sank during the mid or later half of the 17th century. An archaeological survey revealed that even if the vessel was very small it showed many details that are usually found on large sailing warships, such as gun ports along the sides and a lion figure head. Despite the massive attention the wreck has achieved, from researchers, media and others, the original identity of the wreck has remained an open question until now. In the preserved minutes and letters of the Swedish Admiralty kept in the Military Archives reveal that the Swedish king Karl X Gustav ordered a number of small vessels to be used for transport of horses and soldiers in his war against Denmark in 1659. After the unpredicted death of the king, the campaign against Denmark was cancelled and the unfinished ships were rebuilt in different ways. One of these was Bodekull, which was built under supervision of the newly recruited English Master Shipwright Thomas Day between 1659 and 1661. As the design was changed during construction, several unique details, that are also visible on the wreck, are mentioned in the preserved correspondence between the shipyard and the Admiralty. In October 1678 the Bodekull was sent from Kalmar to grind cereals ata mill along the coast. Despite his instructions he sailed to Fagerholmen in the Stockholm archipelago. On its way back the ship hit a rock and sank. 20 barrels of water soaked flour was sent to Stockholm. This article summarizes the archival research that has led to the identification of the ship.

  • 10.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Maktanspråk snidade i trä: Skulpterad symbolik på 1600-talsskepp2020In: Skulpturerna på Vasa: En berättelse om makt / [ed] Anna Maria Forssberg, Stockholm: Vasamuseet/Statens maritima och transporthistoriska museer , 2020, p. 43-60Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Med ting och text i samma båt: arkeologi och historia kring strussen Bodekull, förlist 16782019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung et al., Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 38-39Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Riksäpplet (1676): resurrecting a neglected wreck2017In: Baltic and beyond: Change and continuity in shipbuilding: Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Symposium on Boat and Ship Archaeology, Gdańsk 2015 / [ed] Jerzy Litwin, Gdańsk: National Maritime Museum , 2017, p. 39-48Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Riksäpplet: regalskeppet mitt i Stockholms skärgård2019In: Marinarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 8-14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Skeppsvrak i Haninge skärgård2017In: Haninge - kulturhistorisk översikt, Haninge: Haninge kommun , 2017, p. 30-33Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Sveriges äldsta skeppsritning: en utredning och ett tolkningsförsök2020In: Forum navale, ISSN 0280-6215, E-ISSN 2002-0015, Vol. 76, p. 14-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden´s oldest Ship Drawing: an investigation and interpretationSweden’s oldest drawing of a ship is kept in the National Archives. It depictsa warship with two rows of gunports, hence the working name ‘Theanonymous two-decker’. Unfortunately, nothing is known regarding itsprovenance, when it was made, or who drew it. Most likely we will neverknow which ship is depicted. However, this does not imply that the drawingis totally vapid or incomprehensible. The aim of this article is to datethe drawing, but also to narrow down in which historical context the drawingmay have been created in. The article also sets out to discuss whichships may have been of a similar design. An underlying motif is to makethe drawing more accessible for further research.38 39Drawings from the seventeenth century and earlier are very rare.Through comparing the present drawing with the few other examples thatexist it is apparent that it has not been used for calculating lines and shapeof the ship’s hull, but rather to present the general layout and arrangementof decks, gunports and different rooms aboard.An analysis of the drawing reveal that it was drawn in 1:64 scale usinga ruler of about one foot’s length as the single tool. Contemporary mastershipwrights used dividers, curve rulers and similar to produce their drawings.Hence ‘The anonymous two-decker’ is more of a sketch than a properdrawing. With no doubt it was made by a person with substantial knowledgeabout ships and how to draw and calculate with scale, but it questionableif it was a master shipwright.The drawing has several notes and texts in English. The colour of thetext differs from the colour of the ink in the drawing, which indicates thatthe text is secondary. This means that the person who drew the image andthe one who wrote on it do not have to be the same. Previous researchershave suggested that the drawing was made in England or from an Englishoriginal, but in fact there were several English and Scottish master shipwrightsworking at Swedish shipyards in the late sixteenth and early seventeenthcentury. The text could have been made by one of them.The drawing reveals the ship´s main dimensions: Length of keel, width,depth of hold, as well as some other measurements. It is not possible toidentify a particular ship that corresponds to these dimensions, but it is apparentthat the ship is proportionally wide in relation to its length, whichis archaic. The number of gunports however corresponds to what we knowregarding the Swedish ship Scepter, this without saying that the drawingdepicts this very ship. Scepter was likely much larger than ‘The anonymoustwo-decker’.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Södertörn University, Sweden.
    The ship Riksäpplet and the introduction of English naval architecture in Sweden in the 17th century2017In: Post-Medieval Archaeology, ISSN 0079-4236, E-ISSN 1745-8137, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 309-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 84-gun ship Riksapplet was one of the first ships in Sweden built under supervision of the newly recruited English master. In 1676, the ship came adrift, struck a rock and sank. In 2015 a minor field survey of the wreck was undertaken. An inventory of finds recovered from the wreck in various museum collections and in private hands has been compiled and the preserved correspondence from the construction of the ship has been re-examined. This material has provided new insights regarding the peculiarities and special architecture of Riksapplet.

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Vraket efter Gribshunden (c. 1483-1495) – ett unikt exempel på medeltida skeppsarkitektur2019In: Forum navale, ISSN 0280-6215, E-ISSN 2002-0015, no 75, p. 80-91Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1971 the remains of an old shipwreck were found in shallow water inside the island of Stora Ekön, south of the town of Ronneby in southern Sweden, but it was not until 2000 that archaeologists observed that it was in fact the remains of a large medieval ship. Several underwater archaeological surveys have been carried out at the site and the recovered artefacts are preserved at Blekinge county museum. Wood samples from the wreck was dated to 1483 and in connection the wreck was identified as the remains of King Hans large warship Gribshunden, which sank in the Blekinge archipelago in 1495 on its way from Copenhagen to Kalmar. In 2013 renewed surveys at the wrecksite were initiated through the project “Ships at War” at Södertörn University. Through these surveys it could be stated that Gribshunden resembles one of the state of the art, specially built warships that was introduced in this period. These ships were extremely expensive and very rare already in the 15th century. The survey also showed that much of this important ship still is preserved. The text is based on a lecture for the Swedish Society for Maritime History on 21 November 2018.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Rönnby, Johan
    Mars (1564): the initial archaeological investigations of a great 16th-century Swedish warship2017In: International Journal of Nautical Archaeology, ISSN 1057-2414, E-ISSN 1095-9270, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 92-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Before the Swedish warship Mars exploded and sank in action against a combined Danish and Lubeckian fleet in 1564, it was one of the largest ships in the world. In 2011 the wreck was relocated off the island of Oland in the Baltic Sea. Thanks to the favourable conditions in the brackish water, about two thirds of the hull is preserved on the sea bottom, including the stern with the large sterncastle. The aim of this article is to present initial archaeological observations and results of work since 2011. We briefly describe the historical context and research perspectives regarding this wreck.

1 - 18 of 18
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