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  • 1.
    Bergdahl, Nina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hernvall, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Use of Learning Technologies and Student Engagement in Learning Activities2018In: Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, ISSN 1891-943X, E-ISSN 1891-943X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 113-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As digitalisation spreads in education, it is vital to understand its relation to student engagement. We used student diaries and observation data to approach student engagement and explore the use of learning technologies on a lesson-to-lesson basis. Results show that a less thought-through use of technologies might lead to unconsidered effects. Positive indicators of the facilitation of student engagement included making the learning process accessible and visible to teachers.

  • 2.
    Bergdahl, Nina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    ‘So, You Think It’s Good’ - Reasons Students Engage When Learning with Technologies – a Student Perspective2018In: EDULEARN18: Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2018, p. 9556-9563Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Student engagement is significantly related to school success. With the increasing digitalisation of education, it is essential to explore if student engagement is affected by the uptake of learning technologies (LTs). The aim of this study was to approach what factors students perceive to influence their engagement when learning with technologies. This was done by asking students to report their level of engagement and fill in a questionnaire to evaluate a classroom intervention designed to facilitate engagement. The intervention included a learner assessment application, a virtual learning environment (VLE) And a separate tablet the teacher used to access the shared workspace. These LTs facilitated instant feedback between the teacher and the students and enabled multiple simultaneous dialogues which allowed all students to engage with both content and peers. Results show that students’ invested effort in learning activities were related to their reported levels of engagement. Surprisingly, in this intervention, control and stress showed no correlation with engagement. Some aspects of peer modelling and feedback showed weak correlations, albeit these were non-significant. Instead, students reported that feeling ‘content with one’s outcomes’ and ‘engaging in learner-centred dialogues’ were their main reasons to engage. Moreover, students’ reasons to engage in short tasks were not the same as their reasons to engage with long-term goals, such as completing their assignment. The results show that conditions for learning changed when implementing LTs. As conditions for learning changed, so did students’ reasons to engage. Moreover, insights into students’ reasons to engage and reported levels of engagement to suggest that obtaining this information can be useful to identify students in at-risk zones and offer them the support needed. Orchestration of inclusive engagement and implications for future designs are discussed.

  • 3.
    Bergdahl, Nina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Designing for Engagement in TEL – a Teacher-Researcher Collaboration2018In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 100-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hence, teachers need to consider how their practices affect student engagement. Applying design-based research (DBR), the purpose of this study was to approach influencers of student engagement and explore how teachers and researchers collaboratively could develop learning activities with learning technologies (LTs) to facilitate this. The intervention included an online assessment application, a virtual learning environment (VLE) and an additional tablet for the teacher. The teacher constantly carried the tablet around and used it to access the students’ shared workspace. The intervention was implemented in two classes in an upper secondary school. The study focuses on teachers’ experience and instruction. Three observations of the implementation of learning design and intervention evaluations were analysed. The results indicate that the teachers and researchers could design learning activities that facilitate student engagement. Engagement was facilitated as hindrances to engagement were identified and approached. The suggested solutions shaped the design of the learning activity and included LTs which provided insights into the students’ learning processes and thereby increased the teacher’s ability to scaffold learning and provide timely feedback. The LTs used opened up for additional ways for students to engage with the content, peers and contributions which motivated students to direct their energy toward task. When conditions for learning changed as a result of implementing LTs, both student interaction and teacher practices were affected. However, it was not observed that the teacher would sustain the design without support. This emphasises the need for educational goals and visions to be consistent and communicated to practitioners; otherwise, teachers will not have the guidance needed to advance or evaluate their professional development.

  • 4.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Exploring the Design Space of Genre Pedagogy and Virtual Learning Environments2012In: Designs for Learning 2012: 3rd International Conference Exploring Learning Environments. Conference Proceedings, 2012, p. 75-77Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the design space of genre pedagogy and virtual learning environments. This is done by examining the cornerstones of genre pedagogy and the main activities they give raise to, and how the activities are transformed when they are partly or completely moved from the classroom to virtual learning environments, and what implications for interaction design they give raise to.

  • 5.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Celikten, Emre
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sneiders, Eriks
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Dalianis, Hercules
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    User Centered Development of Automatic E-mail Answering for the Public Sector2012In: Human-Computer Interaction, Tourism and Cultural Heritage / [ed] Francisco Cipolla-Ficarra, Kim Veltman, Huang Chih-Fang, Miguel Cipolla-Ficarra, Andreas Kratky, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, Vol. 7546, p. 154-156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the use of e-mail by the public sector has become a key communication service between citizens and governmental authorities. Although the integration of e-mail in the public sector has certainly brought citizens and handling officers closer, it has also introduced a particular vision on governmental authorities such as for instance the idea that public service and information should be available to citizens any time, anywhere. Such a belief among citizens puts certainly high demands on the quality and efficiency of the e-service governmental authorities are capable to provide. In fact, the growing number of citizens’ electronic requests must be accurately answered in a limited time. In the research project IMAIL (Intelligent e-mail answering service for eGovernment) [1], we have focused on the work carried out at the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (SSIA) that exemplifies a governmental authority dealing with 500,000 emails per year on top of face-to face meetings, phone calls and chat communication. With the objective of creating an e-mail client capable to ease and ensure the quality of SSIAs’ handling officers public service, we have developed a prototype that: (1) automatically answer a large part of simple questions in the incoming e-mail flow, (2) improve the quality of the semi- automatic answers (i.e. answer templates), and finally, (3) reduce the workload for the handling officers. The development of the prototype is grounded in an empirical study conducted at the SSIA. The study comprises the analysis and clustering of 10,000 citizens e-mails and the working activity of 15 handling officers that were collected through questionnaires, interviews and workshops [2].

  • 6.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Daniel, Spikol
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Otero, Nuno
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Exploring Teachers’ perspectives on the use of Mobile devices for Math and Language Learning2014In: Conference proceedings: 4th international Designs for Learning conference 6-9th May 2014, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Karlström, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Materiality of Online Students’ Peer-Review Activities in Higher Education2015In: Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: The Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Conference 2015: Conference Proceedings. Volume 1 / [ed] Oskar Lindwall, Päivi Häkkinen, Timothy Koschmann, Pierre Tchounikine, Sten Ludvigsen, International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2015, p. 308-315Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of the widespread use of technology in higher education, discourses on learning technologies commonly account for their features as disembodied from their use. There has so far been few theoretical approaches which have delved into "the technology question" in CSCL. We present an empirical study that investigates how students’ peer-review activities are entangled with sociomaterial aspects of mediated collaborative learning. The students' peer-review activities were analyzed according to the Collective Instrument-mediated Activity Situation (CIAS) model, and findings show that the materiality of two different tools had considerable influenced how students engaged with the texts and how they interacted with each other.

  • 8.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Otero, Nuno
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Purposeful Learning Across Collaborative Educational Spaces2014In: 11 th International conference of the learning sciences: proceedings / [ed] Joseph L. Polman et al, New York: International Society of the Learning Sciences , 2014, p. 1597-1598Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Näslund, Anders
    Feldt, Tommy
    The use of social annotations tools in higher education2014In: Conference proseedings: 4th international Designs for Learning conference 6-9th May 2014, Stockholm: Stockholm University , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Six ways of interacting with mobile devices in mobile inquiry-based learning2012In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference Mobile Learning 2012 / [ed] Inmaculada Arnedillo Sánchez and Pedro Isaías, 2012, p. 67-74Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We design a mobile learning activity with the aim of supporting inquiry-based learning and analyze it to understand how students interact with mobile devices. For analysis we use a model of contextual human-technology interaction, which is an expansion of an older model by Buxton (1995). Our research question is: How can student interaction in a mobile learning activity be described in the model of contextual human-technology interaction? We approach this question by analyzing an eight minute long video clip of a group of three students using mobile devices for calculating the distribution of trees in a forest area. We categorize the results in six different ways of interacting with technology according to the model. The analysis shows how the model of contextual human-technology interaction can be used for describing placement of technology in mobile learning activities when students are mobile in and between contexts relevant for their learning goals.

  • 11.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Evaluating Interaction with Mobile Devices in Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning2012In: WMUTE '12 Proceedings of the 2012 IEEE Seventh International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education, Washington, DC, USA: IEEE Computer Society, 2012, p. 92-96Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We evaluate to what extent students are interacting with mobile devices in one of four ways intended in the design of a mobile learning activity. Video data from one class of fifth grade students were analyzed using a model of four different types of interaction. The evaluation shows that the students interacted with the devices in the ways intended in design 64% of the time. The contribution is an approach for translating learning goals to interaction design goals in mobile learning research. We conclude that this approach can be of value in designing and evaluating interaction with mobile devices for an entire mobile learning activity.

  • 12.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Using smartphones and QR codes for supporting students in exploring tree species2013In: Scaling up Learning for Sustained Impact: 8th European Conference, on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL 2013, Paphos, Cyprus, September 17-21, 2013. Proceedings / [ed] Davinia Hernández-Leo, Tobias Ley, Ralf Klamma, Andreas Harrer, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 436-441Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smartphones are increasingly being used on field trips to support students in exploring the natural world. In this paper we present a design and analysis of an inquiry-based learning field trip for primary school students. One problem for design is how to make use of smartphones to support, rather than distract, students in interacting with the physical environment. We approach this problem by comparing two alternative designs, where students use smartphones for identifying tree species either by using an identification instrument or by reading a text description. The results show that students made use of the instrument for identification, QR codes, for identifying tree species and made use of the text descriptions for searching for tree species. In this sense, QR codes, connecting contextual information on smartphones to the physical environment, work as a learning tool that may be used for orienting students in their interaction with the physical environment.

  • 13. Hort, Sofia
    et al.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Genre pedagogy for digital learning environments: Design patterns for dialogues about texts2016In: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Designs for Learning: May 18-20, Copenhagen, Denmark / [ed] Anne-Mette Nortvig, Birgitte Holm Sørensen, Morten Misfeldt, Rikke Ørngreen, Benjamin Allsopp, Birgitte Henningsen, Heidi Hautopp, Aalborg: Aalborg Universitetsforlag, 2016, p. 79-97Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of digital learning environments is not a neutral enterprise. The design tells about the designers’ and developers’ view of a learning activity. The main idea in this paper is to map knowledge about genre pedagogy in practice, in prospect of new applications of technology in future teaching practices. The research questions were: How is genre pedagogy implemented in traditional classrooms? How could digital learning environments be designed in order to take advantage of how genre pedagogy is implemented in traditional classrooms? The point of departure for our study is an analysis of three existing case studies of use of genre pedagogy in the classroom. The analysis indicated that genre pedagogy was adapted to the students differing writing experience. Moreover, the different stages of the method could be implemented at various times during the process and they could also be present in varying degrees. On the basis of these results, we argue for certain ways to design digital learning environments based on genre pedagogy. We use design patterns as means for making our design suggestions concrete, and available for communication and development.

  • 14. Karlsson, Niklas
    et al.
    Karlström, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lindström, Berner
    Social bookmarking and tagging in a biology class2013In: Problem-Based Learning for the 21st Century: new practices and learning environments / [ed] Ellen Christiansen, Aalborg: Aalborg Universitetsforlag, 2013, no 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Karlström, Petter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lindström, Henrik
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tool Mediation in Focus on Form Activities: Case studies in a grammar-exploring environment2007In: ReCALL, ISSN 0958-3440, E-ISSN 1474-0109, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 39-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present two case studies of two different pedagogical tasks in a Computer Assisted Language Learning environment called Grim. The main design principle in Grim is to support ‘Focus on Form’ in second language pedagogy. Grim contains several language technology-based features for exploring linguistic forms (static, rule-based and statistical), intended to be used while writing. Our question is, in what ways does Grim support Focus on Form in actual classroom use. We have explored this question within sociocultural theory, emphasizing tool mediation and how tools shape the learner’s activity. The first case concerns a text-reconstruction exercise in which students worked in a pair within the Grim environment. The second case was conducted with another group of students, who engaged in collaborative revision of texts, written in advance by one of the students, in student pairs. In both studies, students were instructed and encouraged to use the different features of Grim. Data was collected by recording dialogue during the sessions with Grim. Our results show how learners put the features of Grim into use in their writing tasks. In some instances, the program was used creatively, in combination with external tools such as the users’ own dictionaries, knowledge of other languages, or teachers. In other instances, we note that Grim was used for error correction, rather than as a language resource. The learners’ activities are thus transformed by their use of the program, from the tasks of revision and text-reconstruction into error correction. The application shapes the activity, in conjunction with the pedagogical tasks. We argue for studying the activities of students with CALL tools, in order to find out in detail how tasks and technology concur in use and what view on language and pedagogy they mediate.

  • 16.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Hallsten, Stina
    Karlström, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Identifying different registers of digital literacy in virtual learning environments2012In: The Internet and higher education, ISSN 1096-7516, E-ISSN 1873-5525, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 237-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper social semiotics, and systemic functional linguistics in particular, are used in order to identify registers of digital literacy in the use of virtual learning environments. The framework of social semiotics provides means to systemize and discuss digital literacy as a linguistic and semiotic issue. The following research question was investigated in the paper: What different registers of digital literacy could be identified when students and teachers communicate and interact in a VLE? The research question was answered by. initially, an application of social semiotics to virtual learning environments, and its relation to the knowledge domains of everyday, specialized and reflexive digital literacy. This application was then further developed, using an analysis of a course specific use of a virtual learning environment in a case study. The study identified discrepancies between the digital literacies of teachers. designers and students. These discrepancies mean that a shared semiotic register was sometimes difficult to maintain. The conclusion is that the designers and teachers as co-designers of virtual learning environments need a better understanding of everyday digital literacy in order to design more sufficient learning environments. The paper shows that digital literacy must be considered as a situated practice, and that it concerns functional and communicative competencies rather than acquiring a set of technical skills.

  • 17.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, stockholm, sweden.
    Westlund, Stefan
    KTH, stockholm, sweden.
    Designing and developing a language environment for second language writers2007In: Computers and education, ISSN 0360-1315, E-ISSN 1873-782X, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 1122-1146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a field study carried out with learners who used a grammar checker in real writing tasks in an advanced course at a Swedish university. The objective of the study was to investigate how students made use of the grammar checker in their writing while learning Swedish as a second language. Sixteen students with different linguistic and cultural backgrounds participated in the study. A judgment procedure was conducted by the learners on the alarms from the grammar checker. The students’ texts were also collected in two versions; a version written before the session with the grammar checker, and a version after the session. This procedure made it possible to study to what extent the students followed the advice from the grammar checker, and how this was related to their judgments of its behavior.

    The results obtained demonstrated that although most of the alarms from the grammar checker were accurate, some alarms were very hard for the students to judge correctly. The results also showed that providing the student with feedback on different aspects of their target language use; not only on their errors, and facilitating the processes of language exploration and reflection are important processes to be supported in second-language learning environments.

    Based on these results, design principles were identified and integrated in the development of Grim, an interactive language-learning program for Swedish. We present the design of Grim, which is grounded in visualization of grammatical categories and examples of language use, providing tools for both focus on linguistic code features and language comprehension.

  • 18.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Karlström, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Björkvall, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Pioneers of collaborative media – students as potential co-­‐designers of virtual learning environments2014In: Conference proceedings, 4th international Designs for Learning conference 6-9th May 2014, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    A Pattern Approach to the Design of Technology Mediated Collaborative Learning in Primary Schools2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present an ongoing research project focusing how to use design patterns as a way to support teachers’ design processes of their teaching supported by collaborative technology. The aim is to equip teachers with design methods and tools for a sustainable use of current and future technology in schools.

  • 20.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Collaborative Pattern Language Representation of Designs for Learning2016In: Short papers, 2016, p. 39-45Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the article we present how teachers by use of design patterns in a participatory design process have captured their experiences of using information technology in teaching. Focus in the design patterns shifted over time from focusing difficulties with technology and proposed solutions to these to didactic and pedagogical aspects of technology use in teaching and learning. A thematic analysis of the teachers’ patterns and pattern languages building on the themes “context of the teacher”, “context of the pupils” and “technology”, is presented. Writing of design patterns helped teachers see relations and dependencies between problems and solutions that would otherwise be difficult to see while the writing of the design patterns simultaneously counted as doing designs for learning.

  • 21.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Deltagande design av undervisning2018In: Att bli lärare / [ed] Eva Insulander, Staffan Selander, Stockholm: Liber , 2018, p. 278-283Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Designmönster och mönsterspråk: Lärare designar tillsammans2017In: Didaktik i omvandlingens tid: text, representation, design / [ed] Eva Insulander, Susanne Kjällander, Fredrik Lindstrand, Anna Åkerfeldt, Stockholm: Liber, 2017, no 0, p. 139-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Teachers’ Collaborative Pattern Language Design2018In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers in their practice make choices grounded in their teaching experience resulting in what could be labelled design solutions. An identified problem is that these design solutions stay at the level of individual solutions and do not reach the teaching community. The aim of this article is to study how teachers´ design solutions can be systematically captured, organized, and communicated through design patterns and a pattern language. Building on participatory design we have together with teachers used and adapted the concept of design patterns and pattern languages as a way of capturing, documenting and communicating design problems and solutions to these. This structured approach led to the teachers seeing connections and interrelations between problems, and that a solution to one of these also helped in alleviating other problems. The formulation of design patterns and proposed pattern languages thus gave the teachers an overview of their practice that would otherwise be difficult to obtain. The content of the design patterns show what problems that are dealt with by the teachers through their design solutions. The structure of the final pattern language shows how problems and solutions are connected to larger goals for the teachers, such as improving the communication with students, as well as the importance of sharing good examples between colleagues.

  • 24.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sneiders, Eriks
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Alfalahi, Alyaa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Opportunities for Improving eGovernment: Using Language Technology in Workflow Management2012In: ICEGOV 2012. The 6 th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Electronic Governance: Proceedings / [ed] J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Natalie Helbig & Adegboyega Ojo, ACM Press, 2012, p. 495-496Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workflow management deals with a fair amount of free text – scanned paper documents, web input forms, e-mail, input from mobile devices as well as texts from government agencies to citizens. The free-text input is intended for a human reader. Still, in eGovernment settings we would like to process such input before, while and after handling officers read it. This paper presents some examples on how language technology can increase efficiency and quality of workflow management.

  • 25.
    Rolf, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    An analysis of digital competence as expressed in design patterns for technology use in teaching2019In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers cannot presume that their learners have the competence to use the technology brought to the classroom. Therefore, the learners’ abilities to use technology may be a concern for teachers. This paper reports on digital competence through an analysis of designs for learning in design patterns, written by upper secondary teachers. Learning activities found in the design patterns were analysed with the aim to understand how teachers perceive the learners’ digital competence when using technology. A framework that compromises digital competence was utilised for inferring the digital competencies. The qualitative analysis of these learning activities reveals that competences of information and data literacy, and of communication and collaboration predominate. By analysing the characteristics of learning activities and hence the teachers’ ideas of technology use in teaching, it is concluded that design patterns can be used to identify the competences teachers believe are relevant for the learners to acquire. The result therefore involves aspects of how teachers perceive learners’ digital competence when using technology in teaching.

  • 26.
    Rolf, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Implicit Pedagogy of Teachers’ Design Patterns2017In: Data Driven Approaches in Digital Education: Proceedings / [ed] Élise Lavoué, Hendrik Drachsler, Katrien Verbert, Julien Broisin, Mar Pérez-Sanagustín, 2017, p. 584-587Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an analysis of upper secondary teachers’ design patterns portraying their technology use in teaching by answering the question: What pedagogy is implicit in technology supported learning activities designed by teachers? Building on a framework defining key characteristics of contemporary learning theories, seventeen design patterns describing technology use in teaching were analyzed. The analysis reveals that individual activities are dominating the patterns. In addition, there is a trend towards activities favoring students’ non-reflection, but also activities being more informative than experiential.

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