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  • 1.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Theorizing Animal–Computer Interaction as Machinations2017In: International journal of human-computer studies, ISSN 1071-5819, E-ISSN 1095-9300, Vol. 98, p. 135-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased involvement of animals in digital technology and user-computer research opens up for new possibilities and forms of interaction. It also suggests that the emerging field of Animal–Computer Interaction (ACI) needs to reconsider what should be counted as interaction. The most common already established forms of interaction are direct and dyadic, and limited to domesticated animals such as working dogs and pets. Drawing on an ethnography of the use of mobile proximity sensor cameras in ordinary wild boar hunting we emphasize a more complex, diffuse, and not directly observable form of interaction, which involves wild animals in a technological and naturalistic setting. Investigating human and boar activities related to the use of these cameras in the light of Actor-Network Theory (ANT) and Goffman's notion of strategic interaction reveals a gamelike interaction that is prolonged, networked and heterogeneous, in which members of each species is opposed the other in a mutual assessment acted out through a set of strategies and counter-strategies. We stress the role of theory for the field of ACI and how conceptualizations of interaction can be used to excite the imagination and be generative for design. Seeing interaction as strategies and acknowledging the existence of complex interdependencies could potentially inspire the design of more indirect and non-dyadic interactions where a priori simplifications of design challenges as either human or animal can be avoided.

  • 2.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Chiodo, Elisa
    Smelling, pulling, and looking: unpacking similarities and differences in dog and human city life2015In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, article id 64Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem of understanding animals, e.g., what they want and what they are doing, are recurrent matters for the emerging field of animal-computer interaction (ACI). We focus on animals in the city by bridging the field with urban studies and open up for new design opportunities in terms of the possibilities of new digital technology to re-configure animal city life. We present an ethnomethodological video analysis of the negotiations and interactional work between two leashed pugs and a handler walking down a street. We unpack similarities and differences between the two species in terms of their interests and intentions in an urban environment through detailed examination of the moments in the walk when the leash is pulled taut. We show how a strained leash can result from a conflict between the dog’s attentiveness towards other dogs by smelling and looking, and the human’s urge to move along. We propose design directions supporting the dogs’ wants and needs by accessing the handler with information on the dogs’ curiosities in other dogs by visualizing the invisible scent-universe of the dogs and encourage dog-dog interaction.

  • 3.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Väätäjä, Heli
    Understanding animals: A critical challenge in ACI2018In: NordiCHI '18 Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 148-160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a qualitative content analysis of visual-verbal social media posts, where ordinary dog owners pretend to be their canine, to identify meaningful facets in their dogs' life-worlds, e.g. pleasures of human-dog relation, dog-dog relations, food etc. We use this knowledge to inform design of "quantified pets". The study targets a general problem in Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI), i.e. to understand animals when designing "for" them, although lacking a common language. Several approaches, e.g. ethnography and participatory design, have been appropriated from HCI without exhausting the issue. We argue for a methodological creativity and pluralism by suggesting an additional approach drawing on "kinesthetic empathy". It implies to understand animals by empathizing with their bodily movements over time and decoding the realities of their life-worlds. This, and other related approaches, has inspired animal researchers to conduct more or less radical participant observations during extensive duration to understand the perspective of the other. We suggest that dog owners whom share their lives with their dogs already possess a similar understanding as these experts, and thus uphold important experiences of canine life that could be used to understand individual dogs and inspire design.

  • 4.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wang, Jinyi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Plant-computer interaction, beauty and dissemination2016In: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Animal-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, article id 5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We inquire into ways of understanding plant interaction through a triangulation of four approaches: a multispecies ethnography of people's ordinary practices and doings in relation to sakura trees during their short blossoming season; readings of theoretical works on human-plant relations and plants' urge to spread; a systematic review of how plants are involved in computing and computer systems; and finally a review study on how cherry blossoms are used in design and architecture. We bring these together and propose to discuss the involvement of florae in computer systems and design items through the lens of understanding plant interaction as temporally extended dissemination and agency to spread. The design intent within Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI) has been to develop systems where non-human species are seen as "users". If such an approach is applied to plants, then we need to frame research in a direction that aims to give us an understanding of what these sorts of users are doing. Since the most successful forms of dissemination are hedonic, we argue that researchers should focus more specifically on system design that supports aesthetic interaction, rather than supporting abstract contemplation, as has been common within Human-Computer Interaction (HCI).

  • 5.
    Brown, Barry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Enjoying Machines2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The dominant feature of modern technology is not how productive it makes us, or how it has revolutionized the workplace, but how enjoyable it is. We take pleasure in our devices, from smartphones to personal computers to televisions. Whole classes of leisure activities rely on technology. How has technology become such an integral part of enjoyment? In this book, Barry Brown and Oskar Juhlin examine the relationship between pleasure and technology, investigating what pleasure and leisure are, how they have come to depend on the many forms of technology, and how we might design technology to support enjoyment. They do this by studying the experience of enjoyment, documenting such activities as computer gameplay, deer hunting, tourism, and television watching. They describe technologies that support these activities, including prototype systems that they themselves developed.

    Brown and Juhlin argue that pleasure is fundamentally social in nature. We learn how to enjoy ourselves from others, mastering it as a set of skills. Drawing on their own ethnographic studies and on research from economics, psychology, and philosophy, Brown and Juhlin argue that enjoyment is a key concept in understanding the social world. They propose a framework for the study of enjoyment: the empirical program of enjoyment.

  • 6.
    Brown, Barry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    What Is Pleasure?2018In: Funology 2: From Usability to Enjoyment / [ed] Mark Blythe, Andrew Monk, Springer, 2018, 2, p. 47-59Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bylund, Markus
    et al.
    SICS.
    Juhlin, OskarStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Fernaeus, YlvaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. SICS.
    Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Engström, Arvid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Brunnberg, Liselott
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Carlsson, Josefin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Instant broadcasting system: mobile collaborative live video mixing2009In: SIGGRAPH ASIA '09: Proceeding. ACM SIGGRAPH ASIA 2009 Art Gallery & Emerging Technologies: Adaptation, New York: ACM , 2009, p. 73-73Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With Instant Broadcasting System, people can collaboratively produce, edit, and broadcast live video using only mobile phones, a laptop computer, and available mobile networks. In this demonstration, it is used as a VJ system that supports visitor-generated video, flexible content selection, a communication back channel, and real-time loop editing. These features move the system beyond previous webcam-based VJ concepts.

  • 9.
    Engström, Arvid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Esbjörnsson, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mobile collaborative live video mixing2008In: Mobile HCI 2008: Proceedings of the 10th international conference on Human computer interaction with mobile devices, New York: ACM , 2008, p. 157-166Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on design research investigating a possible combination of mobile collaborative live video production and VJing. In an attempt to better understand future forms of collaborative live media production, we study how VJs produce and mix visuals live. In the practice of producing visuals through interaction with both music and visitors, VJing embodies interesting properties that could inform the design of emerging mobile services. As a first step to examine a generation of new applications, we tease out some characteristics of VJ production and live performance. We then decide on the requirements both for how visitors could capture and transmit live video using their mobile phones and how this new medium could be integrated within VJ aesthetics and interaction. Finally, we present the SwarmCam application, which has been implemented to investigate these requirements.

  • 10.
    Engström, Arvid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Esbjörnsson, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nighttime visual media production in club environments2008In: CHI 2008 Proceedings, Workshops: Presented at the Night and darkness: Interaction after dark, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze how VJs produce visuals to support DJs in dark and noisy club environments, enhancing the overall experience. We suggest that mobile technologies could improve the interaction between the audience and the VJ. As a first step to the generation of new applications, we tease out some characteristics of VJ production and live performance, which might influence the design of such technologies. We specifically focus on the ways in which VJs interact with the audience and the computer interfaces, as well as how they orient towards specific aesthetical ideals.

  • 11.
    Engström, Arvid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Esbjörnsson, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Perry, Mark
    Producing, Collaborative Video: Developing an Interactive User Experience for Mobile TV2008In: UXTV '08: Proceedings of the 1st international conference on Designing interactive user experiences for TV and video, New York: ACM , 2008, p. 115-124Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of professional live TV production, investigating the work and interactions between distributed camera operators and a vision mixer during an ice hockey game. Using interview and video data, we discuss the vision mixer's and camera operators' individual assignments, showing the role of video as both a topic and resource in their collaboration. Our findings are applied in a design-oriented examination into the interactive user experience of TV, and inform the development of mobile collaborative tools to support amateur live video production.

  • 12.
    Engström, Arvid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Perry, Mark
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Amateur vision and recreational orientation: Creating live video together2012In: CSCW 2012: Proceedings of the ACM 2012 conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 651-660Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the use of a live video broadcast system by a group of collaborating amateur camera operators to film an event on networked cameraphones. Using a detailed interaction analysis of their physical interactions and orientations to the work of others, we examine their choice of camera angles and positions in their filming as they attempt to provide interesting visual content and a coherent narrative. Our findings illustrate how users adapt their behaviour as co-ordination problems occur by drawing from a set of everyday visual practices (‘amateur vision’). The findings also show how the specifically temporal aspect of live video requires extended attention on its production, and that this is at odds with the ‘recreational orientation’ of amateur film crews who simultaneously participate in events for their own enjoyment and film them on behalf of other viewers. Implications for the design of collaborative live broadcast media are made, focusing on approaches to interaction design that augment users’ visual practices and allow users to look on behalf of others while experiencing places and events themselves.

  • 13.
    Engström, Arvid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Zoric, Goranka
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Toussi, Ramin
    The Mobile Vision Mixer: A mobile network based live video broadcasting system in your mobile phone2012In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile broadcasting services, allowing people to stream live video from their cameraphones to viewers online, are becoming widely used as tools for user-generated content. The next generation of these services enables collaboration in teams of camera operators and a director producing an edited broadcast. This paper contributes to this research ...area by exploring the possibility for the director to join the camera team on location, performing mixing and broadcasting on a mobile device. The Mobile Vision Mixer prototype embodies a technical solution for connecting four camera streams and displaying them in a mixer interface for the director to select from, under the bandwidth constraints of mobile networks. Based on field trials with amateur users, we discuss technical challenges as well as advantages of enabling the director to be present on location, in visual proximity of the camera team.

  • 14.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Höök, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Waern, Annika
    The Mobile Services Ecosystem: A Research Foundation for Mobile Life2007In: Proceedings of Global Mobility Roundtable 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Häkkilä, Jonna
    et al.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Boll, Susanne
    Colley, Ashley
    The role and impact of aesthetics in designing mobile devices2016In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services Adjunct, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 1142-1145Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop addresses a topic, which has been relatively (and surprisingly) little considered among mobile HCI research -- aesthetics in design. Whereas research in the area is under represented, aesthetics is one of the key parameters in product design, and an important part of user experience. By understanding the role and impact of aesthetics, we can better understand user behavior and preferences, create better user interfaces, and improve our design processes. As mobile HCI is expanding in mass markets to new areas and form factors such as bracelets, glasses and smart clothing, the possibilities for designers are growing. In this workshop, we consider, e.g., user research, design research, prototypes and case studies related to aesthetics in designing mobile devices and interactions, and draw a research agenda for the future.

  • 16.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Digitizing Fashion: software for Wearable Devices2015In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 44-47Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Social media on the road: The future of car based computing2010Book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Chalmers, Matthew
    New uses for mobile pervasive games - Lessons learned for CSCW systems to support collaboration in vast work sites2009In: Mobile games: the expanding scope, 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract

    New pervasive games draw upon the location of players and objects as well as the availability of several mobile players to create an appealing experience in a large game site. The games include support for interaction other players as well as with location. The advances in games research is of benefit for specific mobile work where a vast site is both topic and resource to get the job done. We discuss how these new means for annotating the location as well as sharing information with colleagues could possibly improve individual work, collaboration as well as learning.

  • 19.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Engström, Arvid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Perry, Mark
    Broth, Mathias
    Temporal hybridity: Mixing live video footage with instant replay in real time2010In: CHI 2010: Proceedings of the 28th international conference on Human factors in computing systems, New York: ACM , 2010, p. 1495-1504Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the production of streaming media that involves live and recorded content. To examine this, we report on how the production practices and process are conducted through an empirical study of the production of live television, involving the use of live and non-live media under highly time critical conditions. In explaining how this process is managed both as an individual and collective activity, we develop the concept of temporal hybridity to explain the properties of these kinds of production system and show how temporally separated media are used, understood and coordinated. Our analysis is examined in the light of recent developments in computing technology and we present some design implications to support amateur video production.

  • 20.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Engström, Arvid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Reponen, Erika
    Mobile broadcasting – The whats and hows of live video as a social medium2010In: Mobile HCI 2010: Proceedings of the 12th international conference on Human computer interaction with mobile devices and services, New York: ACM , 2010, p. 35-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new type of social medium, which allows users to broadcast live video from mobile devices to websites on the internet, is becoming increasingly popular. We provide a qualitative content analysis of a sample from four such services. The analysis specifically focuses on the topics presented, camerawork, and coordination, in order to investigate the possibilities and barriers to wider adoption of this new social medium. Although the services are growing in numbers of users, the study reveals an immature application area. People struggle to find interesting topics to broadcast and to manage the camera in a way that presents them in an appealing form. But there are also examples of topics such as artistic performances and tours, as well as ways to conduct live transitions and coordination, that point to a more medium-specific way of using these services. The results indicate that providing the opportunity to broadcast live video is not enough, and that there is now a need to design for amateurs' appropriation of camera handling techniques.

  • 21.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Engström, Arvid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Önnevall, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Long Tail TV revisited: From ordinary camera phone use to Pro-Am video production2014In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 1325-1334Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pro-Am live video producers broadcast events on a regular basis. They are here selected for an ethnographic study since their continuous content generation can teach us something of what it takes for amateurs, who currently struggle with mastering the video medium, to become proficient producers. We learn from media theory that Pro- Ams are distinguished from professionals in terms of inherent skills and identities, and have therefore focused on these characteristics. We add to this research by showing on-going challenges that the former face in their production, i.e. how their learning practices, such as learning through instructions, are situated and related to particular settings. Learning and development of skills were done as organizations, rather than as individuals. Furthermore, the recurrent nature of both events and broadcasts appears to be an important condition for establishing the terms needed to carry out a production, and to learn the skills of a producer. This understanding may explain in part why accounts in previous research, of single users struggling with the affordances of live video, point to such difficulties in mastering the medium. The findings guide design to better support activities contiguous with the set-up of the production, rather than the broadcast per se. 

  • 22.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Weilenmann, Alexandra
    Making sense of screen mobility: Dynamic maps and cartographic literacy in a highly mobile activity2013In: MobileHCI '13 Proceedings of the 15th international conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 372-381Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic, digital maps are increasingly used in many set- tings. It is an emerging domain of technology extending on previous maps studies and positioning technology. We draw upon ethnographic field studies of collaborative hunting, where hunting dogs are tracked and their location made visible on digital maps. We discuss mobility of two differ- ent kinds. First, we refer to mobility as the practice of physical movements of hunters, dogs and prey. Second, we refer to the movement of symbolic objects on a digital map screen, i.e. screen mobility, and the interpretational work that the hunters do to make sense of it. Representations of motion on a screens, are of ongoing practical concern for the hunters. We show how they interpret such mobility in terms of accelerations, distance, trajectories and temporal alignments. The findings are used to revisit mobility theo- ries and populate them with new notions to inspire design in broad domains.

  • 23.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Zhang, Yanqing
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Unpacking Social Interaction that Make us Adore: On the Aesthetics of Mobile Phones as Fashion Items2011In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2011, p. 241-250Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a study of fashionable people’s expressions of opinions on mobile phones in online fashion media, such as blogs and magazines. First, the study contributes to our understanding of the role of pragmatic philosophy, which is now dominating HCI both as a guide for design and as a guide when looking at social practices, in outlining the role of aesthetics in experience design. Fashion practices di-verge from this theory, since here aesthetic appearances can be visual, ambiguous and incomplete although it still pro-vides a lot of meanings for people. We argue that our find-ings should influence the discussion in HCI to consider a less theoretically oriented aesthetic approach, where instead empirical studies get at the forefront. Second, the study provides valuable insight on how we should design mobile experiences to attract more attention from people interested in fashion. Mobile phones, and their services, can for ex-ample be designed to relate to the visual appearance of the dressed outfit, or ensemble of a person.

  • 24.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Zhang, Yanqing
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sundbom, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    Fashionable Shape Switching: Explorations in Outfit-centric Design2013In: CHI '13 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 1353-1362Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a design exercise illustrating how fashion practices and the fashion design process can be used to create new opportunities both in the mobile domain and in product design, as well as in wearable computing. We investigate the concept of outfit-centric design by extending the support for social and visual interaction with digital devices beyond the currently available shells and stickers, and drawing on the ways in which people vary their dress ensembles. We designed a set of mock-up samples in a local fashion style, as a first step in under-standing possible applications of the emerging technology of organic interfaces. Initial user feedback shows how fashion-conscious participants creatively experimented with the set’s variations of shape and color in outfits created from their personal wardrobes, which revealed the importance of the objects’ size and location on the body. It also points out that a lack of integration with the fashion system’s processes reduces the attractiveness of the samples.

  • 25.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Zhang, Yanqing
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wang, Jinyi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Andersson, Anders
    Fashionable Services for Wearables: Inventing and Investigating a New Design Path for Smart Watches2016In: Proceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, article id 49Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the advent of wearable devices equipped with publicly visible screens, we argue for the need to apply fashion thinking in designing their visual expression. The screen provides endless variations of visual expression, beyond traditional clothing. The topic motivates us to investigate the potential of assembling “fashion thinking” with services generation, to create new forms of use that wearers will adore, as they do with clothes. Disregarding fashion thinking in wearable design might lead to user dissatisfaction and missed opportunities. In an explorative design study we triangulate three methods i.e. a small study on the use of smart watches in dressing practices; an invention and design of a service called “Watch for Figuracy”, with a watch face contextually dependent on the wearer’s dressed ensemble, and finally an initial user feedback study. Altogether they indicate the potential of fashion wearable hybrids and shortcomings in utilizing color theory for matching the watch face to the outfit.

  • 26.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Zoric, Goranka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Engström, Arvid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Reponen, Erika
    Video interaction: a research agenda2014In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 685-692Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Önnevall, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    On the Relation of Ordinary Gestures to TV Screens: General Lessons for the Design of Collaborative Interactive Techniques2013In: CHI '13 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 919-930Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an interaction analysis based on ethnographic fieldwork of how physical movements, including gestures, are produced by viewers in front of television screens in a sports bar. Understanding ordinary life and specifically television watching in social situations will benefit the dis- cussion of the potential of gesture techniques for controlling interactive televisions in various locations. Challenges for system design include body movement recognition, since movements can have many different purposes and are di- rected simultaneously at the screen and co-viewers. More- over, gestures as elements of conversation are sometimes negotiated and overlapping. Since these ordinary move- ments are hard to automatically track and analyse, sug- gested systems might lead to demands on viewers to re- strain their accustomed movements and adapt them in ways that might be considered awkward. We also reveal new design opportunities that draw upon the ways viewers’ gestures are influenced by ongoing broadcast.

  • 28.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Östergren, Mattias
    Time to meet face-to-face and device-to-device2006In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2006, 2006, p. 77-80Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine mobile face-to-face meeting support systems applied to public places and analyse how the temporality of meetings influence the interaction between anonymous participants. Here we uncover a duration paradox. Prolonged meetings between unacquainte people may seem suitable for support systems, since they allow for significant human-computer interaction. At the same time, prolonged meetings can lead to embarrassing consequences, and participants may lose their anonymity. Brief meetings give little opportunity for interacting with systems. But the participants are more prone to provide personal information since the risk of loosing their anonymity is less acute.

  • 29. Mancini, Clara
    et al.
    Lawson, Shaun
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Animal-Computer Interaction: The emergence of a discipline2017In: International journal of human-computer studies, ISSN 1071-5819, E-ISSN 1095-9300, Vol. 98, p. 129-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this editorial to the IJHCS Special Issue on Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI), we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art in this emerging field, outlining the main scientific interests of its developing community, in a broader cultural context of evolving human-animal relations. We summarise the core aims proposed for the development of ACI as a discipline, discussing the challenges these pose and how ACI researchers are trying to address them. We then introduce the contributions to the Special Issue, showing how they illustrate some of the key issues that characterise the current state-of-the-art in ACI, and finally reflect on how the journey ahead towards developing an ACI discipline could be undertaken.

  • 30.
    Mancini, Clara
    et al.
    Open University London.
    van der Linden, Janet
    Häkkilä, Jonna
    Oulu University.
    Noz, Frank
    Wingrave, Chadwick
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Animal-Computer Interaction SIG2012In: CHI '12 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2012, p. 1233-1236Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    User-computer interaction research is demonstrating growing interest in the relation between animals and technology (e.g., computer-mediated interspecies interactions and animal-computer interfaces). However, as a research area, this topic is still underexplored and fragmented, and researchers lack opportunities to exchange ideas, identify resources, form collaborations and co-operatively develop a coherent research agenda. The Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI) SIG meeting aims to provide such an opportunity, promoting the development of ACI as a distinct area of research which is relevant to both animals and humans.

  • 31.
    Mughal, Mudassar Ahmad
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Zoric, Goranka
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Frame Rate Exclusive Sync Management of Live Video Streams in Collaborative Mobile Production Environment2014In: Proceedings of Workshop on Mobile Video Delivery, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 2-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss synchronization problem in an emerging type of multimedia applications, called live mobile collaborative video production systems. The mobile character of the production system allows a director to be present at the site where he/she can see the event directly as well as through the mixer display. In such a situation production of a consistent broadcast is sensitive to delay and asynchrony of video streams in the mixer console. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for this situation called "frame rate exclusive sync manager", which draws on existing reactive source control synchronization techniques. It relies solely on frame-rate control and maintains synchronization between live video streams while ensuring minimal delay by dynamically adapting the frame-rate of the camera feeds based on synchronization offset and network bandwidth health. The algorithm is evaluated by simulation which indicates algorithm's capability of achieving increased synchronization among live streams.

  • 32.
    Mughal, Mudassar Ahmed
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Context-dependent software solutions to handle video synchronization and delay in collaborative live mobile video production2014In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 709-721Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of modern mobile phones, 3G networks, and live video streaming has made it possible to broadcast live video from mobile devices. This is now giving rise to a new class of applications which enable mobile collaborative live video production, in which groups of amateurs work together to provide a rich broadcast of events. We focus on new and expected synchronization problems that arise in these more complex systems when broadcasting live events because of the delays that often occur in streaming over internet and mobile networks. The problem has been investigated by acquiring initial user feedback, as well as conducting technical delay measurements of two examples of such systems and relating them to existing literature. We identified two types of technical problems which affect the mixing of the streams, namely the difference in delay in multiple streams, a.k.a. asynchrony among streams, and the delay between the event itself and its presentation in the mixer. These problems affect the mixing in various ways depending on whether or not the director has visual access to the unmediated event. This knowledge has then been used to inform the conceptualization of identifiable ways of handling delays and synchronization. We suggest the introduction of a software feature providing context-dependent delay, in which these requirements can be balanced differently to fit specific contexts of use. We specifically address the different types of mixing which occurs when the director, or mixer, only has access to the topic through the mobile media (“out of view”), as well as mixing in a context in which the topic also is physically present (“in-view”) in front of the mixer.

  • 33.
    Mughal Mudassar, Ahmed
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wang, Jinyi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juxtaposing mobile webcasting and ambient video for home décor2014In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 151-159Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to invent and investigate new approaches for the use of enjoying live video, we suggest a combination of emerging mobile webcasting with artistic ambient video, which would enable a form of user generated broadcasts from individually selected cherished places for home decoration. Drawing on the approach of Research through Design we present a study of people who have occasional access to highly appreciated geographical locations, a design instantiation and prototype called LiveNature, as well as a system implementation. We present the result of a technical evaluation, which was conducted during two weeks of deployment. It shows that mobile webcasting provide continuous and stable streams of such a quality that it can be presented for home decoration, and that the video can be combined with real time sensor data to generate aesthetically interesting hybrid media. We also learned that the use of mobile webcasting for home decoration raises new challenges in order to provide unobtrusive and glance based interaction.

  • 34. Perry, Mark
    et al.
    Broth, Mathias
    Engström, Arvid
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Visual Narrative and Temporal Relevance: Segueing Instant Replay into Live Broadcast TV2019In: Symbolic interaction, ISSN 0195-6086, E-ISSN 1533-8665, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 98-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional production of live TV combines real-time and recorded video into a single broadcast stream. In live TV, non-live instant replay footage can help viewers to make sense of what has just happened. This article shows how multi-person TV production teams assemble timely and relevant instant replays that can be seamlessly combined with real-time footage during live broadcasts. Detailed interaction analysis demonstrates how this work is dependent on coordinated practices, and how team members achieve this by orienting to narrative concerns across multiple temporalities to produce topically useful instant replays, displaying clip relevance, and help segueing transitions between the ongoing action and replay. We conclude by examining the interrelationships between the sequential flow of visual content, the role of talk in mediating time-shifted visual alignments, and how members make their work visible and accountable to one another and to their intended audience.

  • 35. Perry, Mark
    et al.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Engström, Arvid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Dealing with Time, Just in Time Sense-Making and Clip Allocation in Multiperson, Multistream, Live Replay TV Production2014In: Studies of Video Practices: Video at Work / [ed] Broth, M.; Laurier, E.; Mondada, L., London: Routledge, 2014, Vol. 64, p. 262-285Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36. Perry, Mark
    et al.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Engström, Arvid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Dealing with Time, Just in Time: Sense-making and Clip Allocation in Mult-Person, Multi-Stream, Live Play TV Production2014In: Studies of Video Practices: Video at Work / [ed] Mathias Broth, Eric Laurier and Lorenza Mondada, New York: Routledge, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Perry, Mark
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Esbjörnsson, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Engström, Arvid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lean collaboration through video gestures: co-ordinating the production of live televised sport2009In: CHI '09: Proceedings of the 27th international conference on Human factors in computing systems, New York: ACM , 2009, p. 2279-2288Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the work and interactions between camera operators and a vision mixer during an ice hockey match, and presents an interaction analysis using video data. We analyze video-mediated indexical gestures in the collaborative production of live sport on television between distributed team members. The findings demonstrate how video forms the topic, resource and product of collabora-tion: whilst it shapes the nature of the work (editing), it is simultaneously also the primary resource for supporting mutual orientation and negotiating shot transitions between remote participants (co-ordination), as well as its end prod-uct (broadcast). Our analysis of current professional activi-ties is used to develop implications for the design of future services for live collaborative video production.

  • 38. Väätäjä, Heli
    et al.
    Majaranta, Päivi
    Törnqvist, Heini
    Ainasoja, Mari
    Surakka, Veikko
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mancini, Clara
    Technology for Bonding in Human-Animal Interaction2017In: Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Animal-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, article id 20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop focuses on the use and influence of technology on human-animal bonding, and how to facilitate them with technology. We explore the elements and characteristics of human-animal bonding, and how technology is connected to emotions and bonding between the human and the animal. We are particularly interested in animal's experiences, emotions, and welfare in bonding. The workshop facilitates discussion, creates a framework to support design activities, identifies future research themes, and creates ideas on facilitating the mutual bonding in human-animal interaction. The main focus is on dogs, but workshop aims is to pave way for further investigations and research with other domestic animals, such as cats, horses, and rabbits.

  • 39.
    Wang, Jinyi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fashion, Fiction, Function: Mediating Wearable Design Through Fashion Film2017In: NORDES 2017: DESIGN+POWER, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Wang, Jinyi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fashionizing Wearable Experiences through Fashion FilmManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Wang, Jinyi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Banka Johnson, Eva-Carin
    Previsualization with Computer Animation (Previs): Communicating Research to Interaction Design Practice2014In: Proceedings of the 26th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference on Designing Futures: the Future of Design, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 11-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been growing concern about a gap between HCI research and industrial practitioners. We review methods proposed in HCI for enhancing communication between researchers and designers, and propose previsualization animation, borrowed from the movie industry, as an additional means to support this communication. The potential benefit is investigated through a process of designing and producing an animated film for a design research project at a furniture company and gathering initial user feedback. We argue that a technique that accounts for interaction dynamics and provisionality and that supports brevity and mobility can communicate design research in an inspirational manner to practitioners. However we also identified a remaining difference in the two groups' expectations about the animation, with researchers wanting it to be more research-like and practitioners wanting it to be more production-oriented.

  • 42.
    Wang, Jinyi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Blomgren, Erika
    Bågander, Linnea
    Kägo, Evelin
    Meier, Florian
    Takahashi, Mariko
    Thornquist, Clemens
    Design space of the new materials for fashionable wearables2016In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services Adjunct, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 1159-1162Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a design workshop that explores the future of fashionable wearable technology focusing on aesthetics. The results of the workshop include four fashion design concepts and the implications emerged from the discussions on each concept during the workshop. These implications open up new design space of technologies and materials that account for aesthetics beyond traditional fabric, i.e. transparency, scale, irregularity, movement, contextual expressions and fashion intelligence.

  • 43.
    Wang, Jinyi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hughes, Nathan
    Fashion Film as Design Fiction for Wearable Concepts2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 461-461Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This video presents a design fiction in the form of a fashion film. It intends to mediate a design concept for a smartwatch that can change its colors and patterns to fit in the wearer's dress ensemble, which has been reported previously [1]. We see an increased interest in HCI to design fashionable wearables. However, visually appealing designs are not necessarily considered fashionable. We are motivated by the fundamental role of fashion media in transforming clothing items into fashionable garments. Fashion film, as one of the most important fashion media in the industry today, has the potential to represent wearable design concepts and to speak to a fashion-oriented audience within and beyond HCI.

  • 44.
    Wang, Jinyi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mughal, Mudassar Ahmad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Experiencing Liveness of a Cherished Place in the Home2015In: Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Interactive Experiences for TV and Online Video, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 3-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liveness, as discussed in HCI and in media studies, focuses on an intriguing and beloved experiential quality that can influence new forms of video applications. We suggest a shift from accounts of liveness in "events" to liveness in ambient media for home décor by designing a system called TransLive that exploits the "magic" of mediatizing the "now" at a distant and cherished place. We present an interview study including four families, who experienced the system for two weeks each in a concept apartment setting. It shows how immediacy and unpredictability provide compelling experiences. Authenticity and engagement, which are previously considered as inherent qualities in live media, instead occur in the context of use. Finally, the experience of transcendence triggered by slow and continuous video streams open up a new design space of liveness. Thus, not only do we take inspiration from liveness theory, but we also need to redefine it.

  • 45.
    Zhang, Yanqing
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fashion as System or Action Net in ‘Fashion in All Things’: a Case in Color Design of Mobile Phones2012In: Fashion: Exploring Critical Issues / [ed] Barbara Brownie, Laura Petican, Johannes Reponen, Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2012, no 1, p. 263-270Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary fashion has permeated into all things in life beyond clothes. Recently, fashion theories take on interests in organization and system. Kawamura proposes a fashion system through which clothing is transformed into the idea of fashion. Can this fashion system be used to analyze other things in fashion? We present a study using mobile phone, one of the most intimate gadgets to people, as a way to approach ‘fashion in all things’. We chose the color as a way to study the fashion aspect in mobile design. Through the empirical study, we find that the decision making of color in mobile industry is a collective process. It is greatly influenced by technology, materials, consumer lifestyle and trend. The trendy colors in mobile design are not defined by certain cultural or social institutions, but formulated by actions conducted by various actors in certain social context. Our study shows that fashion can embrace more than Kawamura’s system, e.g. the action net of color design in mobile technology. Although mobile design shares some similarities with clothing fashion, the concept of fashion-ology is very Parisian and deals with only clothing. It is not fully applicable to mobile industry. If we want to use a fashion system that can apply to fashion in all things, we should revisit the theory to reveal the general characteristics of the fashion world or build smaller theory for each category.

  • 46.
    Zhang, Yanqing
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fashion in Mobile Phone Design – The Emergence of Beautification, Desirability and Variation through Institutional Collaboration2016In: Fashion Practice: the journal of design, creative process & the fashion industry, ISSN 1756-9370, E-ISSN 1756-9389, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 63-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study if and how fashion values, such as beautification, desirability through symbolic interaction, and high variation, are increasingly visible in mobile phone design. We unpack such possible inter-linkages by interviewing eight representatives of both industries. Their comments allow us to discuss whether a process of fashionalization is underway and, if so, how it is taking place. Our findings indicate that fashion values are visible in the design of mobile phones and are accounted for in design. Fashionalization can thus be seen as emanating from institutions related to clothing that extend to and become shared with the mobile industry, such as a shared dependency on trend agencies for color selection and joint events. This interaction, ad hoc and heterogeneous, resists being modeled as a “system,” which has been suggested as a way to explain institutional work within clothing fashion. Drawing on Barbara Czarniawska’s institutional theory, we propose conceptualizing the emerging institutional work in terms of “action nets.” This concept makes visible flexible, situated, and ad hoc activities rather than stable and fixed organizational entities.

  • 47.
    Zhang, Yanqing
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The “life and death” of great Finnish fashion phone: A periodization of changing styles in Nokia phone design between 1992 and 20132016In: Mobile Media & Communication, ISSN 2050-1579, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 385-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual aesthetics is an essential part of our experience of mobile devices, but the ways in which it is accounted for in design have largely been overlooked. We investigate whether an aesthetization of mobile design is taking place and, if so, how it is being pursued through institutional practices in organizations. We conduct a visual analysis of all Nokia phone releases between 1992 and 2013 complemented by an interview series with key actors. The study reveals a continuous increase in aesthetic variation between 1998 and 2008, which is visible in the variation of colors, forms and materials. The period between 2003 and 2008, which we term the Grand period, marks the peak of aesthetization of Nokia’s devices. It exhibits great variation, and is visibly similar to aesthetics in the fashion industry. With the introduction of the slate form, we see a decrease in visual variation between 2009 and 2013. The interviews reveal how the visual design was driven by organizational strategies, such as customer segmentation in general, and an orientation toward the fashion industry, e.g. in the creation of a fashion segment. The study reveals how aesthetic variation is weaved into a complex innovation system with sometimes conflicting demands deriving from e.g. technology and user interaction.

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