Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Dickerson, Aisha S.
    et al.
    Ransome, Yusuf
    Karlsson, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Human prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and risk behaviors in adolescence2019In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 129, p. 247-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are chemicals used in a variety of products before they were widely banned due to toxic effects in humans and wildlife. Because of continued persistence and ubiquity of these contaminants, risk of exposure to people living in industrialized countries is still high. Experimental research show that developmental exposure to PCB may alter function of brain pleasure centers and potentially influence disinhibitory behaviors, including tobacco and alcohol use. Yet, the potential effects of developmental PCB exposure on adolescent substance use have not been studied in humans. We used the Child Health and Development Studies (CHDS), a prospective birth cohort study in the Oakland and East Bay areas of California, to investigate associations between prenatal exposure to PCB congeners (66, 74, 99, 118, 138, 153, 170, 180, 187, and 203) and later disinhibitory behaviors in adolescents, specifically alcohol consumption and smoking, in a randomly selected sample (n = 554). Total prenatal PCB exposure was not associated with disinhibitory behaviors, among adolescents. However, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for being a current smoker, was higher in subjects within the third quartile of maternal PCB 66 exposure compared to those below the median (aOR = 1.93; 95% CI 1.05, 3.55). The aOR for drinking > 2 alcoholic beverages per week, were also higher for adolescents within the third (aOR = 1.46; 95% CI 0.86, 2.47) and fourth quartile of PCB 66 exposure (aOR = 1.39; 95% CI 0.83, 2.35), but the differences did not reach statistical significance. These results suggest that this specific PCB congener may play a role inducing neurodevelopmental alterations that could potentially increase the risk of becoming a long-term user of tobacco and possibly alcohol. There were no notable differences between magnitude or direction of effect between boys and girls. Future replicate analyses with larger longitudinal samples and animal experimental studies of potential underlying mechanisms are warranted.

  • 2.
    Pierozan, Paula
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Mitotically heritable effects of BMAA on striatal neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation2019In: Cell Death and Disease, ISSN 2041-4889, E-ISSN 2041-4889, Vol. 10, article id 478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread environmental contaminant beta-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a developmental neurotoxicant that can induce long-term learning and memory deficits. Studies have shown high transplacental transfer of 3H-BMAA and a significant uptake in fetal brain. Therefore, more information on how BMAA may influence growth and differentiation of neural stem cells is required for assessment of the risk to the developing brain. The aim of this study was to investigate direct and mitotically inherited effects of BMAA exposure using primary striatal neurons and embryonic neural stem cells. The neural stem cells were shown to be clearly more susceptible to BMAA exposure than primary neurons. Exposure to 250 mu M BMAA reduced neural stem cell proliferation through apoptosis and G2/M arrest. At lower concentrations (50-100 mu M), not affecting cell proliferation, BMAA reduced the differentiation of neural stem cells into astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons through glutamatergic mechanisms. Neurons that were derived from the BMAA-treated neuronal stem cells demonstrated morphological alterations including reduced neurite length, and decreased number of processes and branches per cell. Interestingly, the BMAA-induced changes were mitotically heritable to daughter cells. The results suggest that early-life exposure to BMAA impairs neuronal stem cell programming, which is vital for development of the nervous system and may result in long-term consequences predisposing for both neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative disease later in life. More attention should be given to the potential adverse effects of BMAA exposure on brain development.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf