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  • 1.
    Ekendahl, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Brukarnöjdhet i beroendevården - en studie av patientinflytande, behandlingstilltro och samordnade insatser2013Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ekendahl, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The credibility of risk information about licit substances: An exploratory study of attitudes among Swedish adults2015In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 395-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS – Providing risk information on licit substances is a central health promotion strategy. Thereis, however, very little knowledge about public attitudes on this information. In this exploratorystudy we analyse the extent to which Swedish adults: 1) trust risk information regarding alcohol,cigarettes and wet snuff (“snus”) provided by public authorities, 2) perceive risk informationregarding alcohol, cigarettes and snus as consistent, and 3) have received an adequate amountof risk information from public authorities regarding these substances. The aim is also toinvestigate if certain characteristics among participants are related to their perceptions of suchrisk information. METHODS – A questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of individuals aged18 to 70 (n=1623, 54% response rate). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression techniqueswere used to process data. RESULTS – Participants trusted risk information concerning cigarettes,snus and alcohol provided by public authorities, and reported that they had received an adequateamount of it. Information about cigarettes was seen as more trustworthy and consistent thaninformation about alcohol and snus. The study suggests that attitudes on risk information aresubstance-specific and associated in complex ways with gender, age, education and experience ofown substance use. CONCLUSION – While only a first attempt to map an under-investigated area,our study highlights complexities in how people perceive risk information about licit substances. Italso indicates that the general population in Sweden receives what is seen as an adequate amountof knowledge from public authorities, and finds it consistent and trustworthy.

  • 3.
    Ekendahl, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The trustworthiness and credibility of risk information about licit substances: Attitudes among Swedish adults2014In: Paper presented at 40th Annual Alcohol Epidemiology Symposium of the Kettil Bruun Society, Torino, Italy, 9 - 13 June 2014., 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Providing risk information regarding licit substances is a central strategy in public health promotion. The aim of this paper is to explore the extent to which a random sample of Swedes: 1) trust risk information regarding alcohol, cigarettes and wet snuff (“snus”) provided by public authorities, 2) perceive risk information regarding alcohol, cigarettes and snus as contradictory, and 3) have received an adequate amount of risk information from public authorities regarding these licit substances. Methods: A questionnaire was mailed to Swedish adults aged 18 to 70 (n=1623, 54% response rate). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression techniques were used to process data. Results: Participants trusted risk information concerning cigarettes, snus and alcohol provided by public authorities, and reported that they had received an adequate amount of information. Information about cigarettes was seen as more trustworthy and consistent than information about alcohol and snus. Conclusion: The study suggests that attitudes toward risk information are substance-specific and associated with gender, age, education and experience of own substance use. While highlighting complexities in how people perceive risk information, our data also illustrate that the general population in Sweden seems to be quite well equipped when it comes to risk information about licit substances.

  • 4.
    Ekendahl, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The user in Swedish abstinence-oriented opioid substitution therapy: a closer look at how user involvement bears upon policy formation2016In: Evidence in European social drug research and drug policy / [ed] Aileen O'Gorman, Gary R. Potter, Jane Fountain, Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers, 2016, p. 51-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of placing the views of service users at the centre of evidence-based practice has been praised in theory but rather neglected in empirical drug treatment research. Knowledge is scarce about how users’ perspectives are handled in policy and practice. In this chapter, we explore how Swedish opioid substitution treatment (OST) was perceived by users themselves and how their views were taken up by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare in developing new treatment regulations for OST. We argue that, despite the current valorisation of ‘the user’s voice’ across the health professions, the concept basically has no meaning in Swedish drug policy. The user preferences we identified (such as a desire for less suspicious staff, and acceptance of some drug use on top of their prescription) appeared to be more or less impossible to realise given the core prohibitionist values underpinning Swedish OST policy. While user involvement is commonly described as a keystone in the ‘evidence movement’, our analysis, of a contemporary policymaking process in the field of drug treatment, indicates that it served more as a rhetorical device than as a sine qua non of OST.

  • 5.
    Ekendahl, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Månsson, Josefin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Logics of Legitimation in Swedish Treatment for Youth Cannabis Use: The Problem Representations of Social Workers in a Prohibitionist Policy ContextIn: Contemporary Drug ProblemsArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liberal views on cannabis use are widespread in many Western countries, but prohibitionism remains strong in Sweden. According to Swedish drug policy, comprehensive prevention and treatment interventions are necessary because young people are considered particularly vulnerable to cannabis-related harm. In this article, we examine how staff at Swedish outpatient treatment centers for young substance users (called “MiniMaria”) use different logics when legitimizing their work in youth treatment. We also analyze how this legitimizing process contributes to both justifying solutions and constituting the cannabis “problem” that MiniMaria centers are established to handle. This will shed light on what “drug reality” the staff make up through their articulations. Eighteen interviews with social workers from six MiniMaria centers in the Stockholm region were analyzed. To illustrate how staff made sense of their work, we used the concepts of “problem representation”, “legitimation”, and “logics”. We identified four logics: A scientific and a structural logic linked to knowledge claims, policy goals, and organizational setting, and a professional and a procedural logic linked to work experience, client interaction, and therapeutic methods. Participants used logics to emphasize that the character of the cannabis problem demands wide-ranging interventions and to explain how they made youth cannabis users realize they need treatment. The structural logic of drug prohibitionism was only mentioned as a last resort when other logics were not applicable, for example, when a young person refused to engage in treatment and quit using cannabis. The strategic use of logics provided MiniMaria with a moral legitimacy that represented youth cannabis use as a high-profile problem and young people as in need of protection and control. This legitimizes prevention of youth cannabis use in a national setting where cannabis prevalence and harm remains relatively low.

  • 6.
    Elofsson, Stig
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Föräldrars och andra vuxnas betydelse för alkoholkonsumtionen: En studie av högstadie- och gymnasieelver2011Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Heimdahl, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Psychosocial interventions for substance-abusing parents and their young children: A scoping review2016In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1058-6989, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 236-247Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this scoping review was to give an overview of efficacy research on psychosocial interventions aimed at substance-abusing parents with children of up to the age of three. Throughout the overview, there was a focus on underlying assumptions and how the problem descriptions motivating the interventions corresponded with the solutions, i.e. the interventions in question. The data consisted of peer reviewed intervention studies (n = 22) identified through literature searches in online databases. Randomised controlled trial studies as well as quasi-experimental and pre-post studies were included. The results showed that all the studies included bar one focused exclusively on women as parents. Moreover, while the problem descriptions in the studies tended to be quite broad, framing parental substance abuse as a problem influenced by social and structural conditions, the solutions presented in the form of interventions generally had a narrower focus, addressing the individual parent from a psychological perspective only. In conclusion, the review points out the need for developing and evaluating interventions aimed at substance-abusing fathers as well as mothers, and also underscores the importance of these interventions being focused on a broader range of factors rather than just addressing deficits at the level of the individual.

  • 8.
    Heimdahl, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Riktade insatser till gravida och spädbarnsföräldrar med problematiskt bruk av alkohol, narkotika och läkemedel och psykisk ohälsa: en nationell kartläggning av barnhälsovård, mödrahälsovård och socialtjänst2015Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Heimdahl, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Riktade psykosociala insatser till gravida och småbarnsföräldrar med problematiskt bruk av alkohol och narkotika:en litteraturstudie2013Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Heimdahl, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Riktade psykosociala insatser till gravida och småbarnsföräldrar med psykisk ohälsa: en litteraturstudie2013Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Heimdahl, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Samverkan kring gravida med missbruksproblem: en studie av Mödra-Barnhälsovårdsteamet i Haga2016Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Alternatives to the deficit model of adolescent drug use2010In: Pleasure, pain and profit. European perspectives on drugs / [ed] Decorte, Tom & Fountain, Jane, Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers , 2010, p. 21-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Between a rock and a whirlpool? Measurement problems in assessing risk perceptions of illicit drug use2011In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 149-157Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Explaining Small Effects of Information-based Drug Prevention: The Importance of Considiring Preintervention Levels in Risk Perceptions2008In: Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education, ISSN 0090-1482, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 9-17Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Inneboende problem i informationsbaserad, universell prevention2010In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 259-268Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Integrerade etiologiska analyser och drogprevention2012In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 19, no 3-4, p. 217-231Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Personal experiences of drinking and alcohol-related risk perceptions: The importance of the subjective dimension2012In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 413-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims - To explore the association between subjective experiences of drinking and alcohol-related risk perceptions. Methods - The data is based on a questionnaire with questions about beliefs, use habits and experiences of alcohol and tobacco sent to a random sample of 3,000 Swedes aged 18 to 70 years (response rate= 1,623 individuals, or 54%). In this study, those respondents who had ever been drinking alcohol were included (1,536 individuals). The data were analysed statistically by cross tabs and multiple logistic regression. Results - With some exceptions, the results generally showed that differences in subjective experiences of drinking were related to risk perceptions of alcohol consumption. In particular, those who had more negative than positive subjective experiences of alcohol consumption had substantially higher risk perceptions than those who had more positive than negative experiences, controlling for alcohol consumption and potential confounders. There were also several significant differences between individuals differently involved in alcohol consumption, net of subjective experiences. Conclusions - Subjective experiences of alcohol consumption appear to be an important construct in relation to alcohol-related risk perceptions. To understand the link between personal experiences and risk perceptions pertaining to alcohol consumption, both objective measures of personal experiences and subjective measures should be considered.

  • 18.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Skolbaserad drogundervisning: Angreppssätt, påvisade effekter och framtida utmaningar2009In: Alkohol och droger: samhällsvetenskapliga perspektiv / [ed] Kajsa Billinger & Lena Hübner, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2009, p. 87-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The relationship between affective associations with alcohol and binge drinking2012In: Journal of Substance Use, ISSN 1465-9891, E-ISSN 1475-9942, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 41-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the relationship between affective associations with alcohol and binge drinking. Prior research on the proximal determinants of alcohol consumption has typically focused on cognitive factors such as outcome expectancies, leaving aside affect (i.e. emotional factors). Participants in this study were a random, nationally representative sample of Swedes aged between 18 and 70 (n = 1623, response rate 54%). The results showed that affective associations with alcohol are related to binge drinking, even after controlling for gender, age, education, family situation and perceived risk. This article concludes that affective associations probably should be considered in explanatory frameworks of alcohol consumption, although more research is needed on the causal relationship of affective associations to drinking habits.

     

  • 20.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ungdomar och alkohol: Tonåringarna gör som föräldrarna gör2009In: Socionomen, ISSN 0283-1929, no 8, p. 16-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bergmark, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Compared with what? An analysis of control group typies in Cochrane and Campbell reviews of psychosocial treatment efficacy with substance use disorders2015In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 110, no 3, p. 420-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims

    A crucial, but under-appreciated, aspect in experimental research on psychosocial treatments of substance use disorders concerns what kinds of control groups are used. This paper examines how the distinction between different control group designs has been handled by the Cochrane and the Campbell Collaborations in their systematic reviews of psychosocial treatments of substance abuse disorders.

    Methods

    We assessed Cochrane and Campbell reviews (n = 8) that were devoted to psychosocial treatments of substance use disorders. We noted what control groups were considered and analysed the extent to which the reviews provided a rationale for chosen comparison conditions. We also analysed whether type of control group in the primary studies influenced how the reviews framed the effects discussed and whether this was related to conclusions drawn.

    Results

    The reviews covered studies involving widely different control conditions. Overall, little attention was paid to the use of different control groups (e.g. head-to-head comparisons vs. untreated controls) and what this implies when interpreting effect sizes. Seven of eight reviews did not provide a rationale for the choice of comparison conditions.

    Conclusions

    Cochrane- and Campbell reviews of the efficacy of psychosocial interventions with substance use disorders seem to underappreciate that use of different control group types yields different effect estimates. Most reviews have not distinguished between different control group designs and therefore have provided a confused picture regarding absolute and relative treatment efficacy. A systematic approach to treating different control group designs in research reviews is necessary for meaningful estimates of treatment efficacy.

  • 22.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bergmark, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Evidence-based practice - anything goes?2012In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 281-282Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bergmark, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Implementing guidelines for substance abuse treatment: a critical discussion of "Knowledge to Practice"2012In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 253-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS - We critically discuss the campaign "Knowledge to Practice". A popular assumption within the evidence-based practice (EBP) framework is that guidelines for best practices are useful for increasing the inflow of research into practice. In Sweden, an initiative known as "Knowledge to Practice" (KTP) has since 2008 been devoted to implementing the National Board of Health and Welfare's guidelines for substance abuse treatment in practice. MATERIAL - Our critical discussion is based on an analysis of available documents describing the KTP campaign. RESULTS - We argue that the implementation process is marred with problems all the way from the beginning, where the guidelines are produced, to the final stage of local "adoption". The vague character of the guidelines coupled with unclear usages of key concepts such as "service user involvement" and EBP as well as a perspective of EBP that in certain respects undermine the legitimacy of its own mission lead us to raise serious doubt about KTP. CONCLUSSIONS - We conclude that KTP can be seen as a clear example of a general unawareness of the two main, largely incompatible "models" of EBP identified in the literature. Further, KTP may as a consequence of this have had the unintended effect of disseminating vague and unclear conceptions of EBP to practitioners.

  • 24.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bergmark, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nya grepp i preventionsarbetet?: En granskning av Alkoholkommitténs och Mobilisering mot Narkotikas massmediekampanjer2009In: Nordisk Alkohol- och Narkotikatidskrift, ISSN 1455-0725, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 5-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bergmark, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lundström, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Effects of psychosocial interventions on behavioural problems in youth: A close look at Cochrane and Campbell reviews2017In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 177-187Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research indicates that a number of psychosocial interventions are effective for reducing behavioural problems in youth. These interventions are now often included on best practice lists aiming to facilitate informed treatment choices among practitioners. However, analyses in neighbouring research areas have highlighted serious shortcomings in how primary studies are analysed and how studies are synthesised in research reviews. This study took a closer look at the evidence of efficacy for psychosocial interventions that aim to reduce behavioural problems in youth, as shown in systematic research reviews by the Cochrane and the Campbell Collaborations (n = 8). The findings suggest a bias towards overemphasising the efficacy of the interventions in several reviews, an over-confidence in the validity of the findings in some reviews and, overall, a somewhat uncertain evidence base for the efficacy of the interventions. Systematic reviews are crucial for summarising research but more attention to methodological issues may be needed in this area.

  • 26.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bergmark, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lundström, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Procedures and claims among US evidence-producing organizations: the case of the Incredible Years programme2014In: Evidence & Policy: A Journal of Research, Debate and Practice, ISSN 1744-2648, E-ISSN 1744-2656, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 61-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore how four evidence-producing organisations in the US go ahead when they rate the evidence base for psychosocial interventions, using the Incredible Years programme as our case study. The findings demonstrate variation in the procedures and resulting evidence claims across the organisations, with some organisations being strict and some being permissive. The presence of such conflicting practices highlights central challenges for the evidence-based practice framework and its ambition of obtaining uniform evidence statements. We conclude that practitioners and policy makers should be aware of such variation in order to be able to make informed decisions regarding which programmes to use.

  • 27.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ekendahl, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Gripe, Isabella
    Raninen, Jonas
    Individual and school-class correlates of youth cannabis use in Sweden: a multilevel study2018In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 131-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: The school-class context is a crucial social environment for young people but substance use researchers have largely overlooked potential influences operating at this level. This study explores associations between school-class and individual-level factors and cannabis use in Swedish youth.

    Data and methods: Data comprised four waves (2012–2015) of the Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs’ (CAN) nationally representative school surveys among individuals in 9th and 11th grade. For the present analyses, we had data on totally 28,729 individuals from 2377 unique school classes. Multilevel logistic regressions predicted lifetime and 10+ times use of cannabis from both individual-level predictors and school-class-level measures derived from the individual-level variables.

    Results: There were individual-level associations between most predictor variables and cannabis use. An early debut of tobacco use and binge drinking as well as low cannabis related risk perceptions had strong associations with cannabis use. Conversely, several school-class-level variables had aggregate relationships with cannabis use, most notably the overall level of risk perceptions in the school class. Some of the school-class factors predicted cannabis use over and above the individual-level covariates, suggesting the presence of contextual effects. Surprisingly, while female gender was negatively related with cannabis use at the individual level, a higher proportion of females in the classroom increased the odds for lifetime cannabis use even after controlling for individual and other contextual-level covariates.

    Conclusions: Youth cannabis use is related to various factors at both the individual and school-class level in Sweden. Truancy and perceived risk related to cannabis use had contextual associations with cannabis use. The positive contextual association between a higher proportion of females in the classroom and lifetime use should be explored further.

  • 28.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lundström, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    ADHD på kartan, om geografiska skillnader i medicinering till barn och unga2015In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 92, no 5, p. 553-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ADHD is the fastest growing psychiatric diagnosis among young people in Sweden. Drug treatment is common practice among those with a diagnosis. This study explores geographic differences in drug prescription. Municipal level differences in prescription rates are large and can to some extent be accounted for by factors within the municipalities. However factors on the regional level seem to be of outmost importance, also for variations between municipalities. Regional differences in prescription can hardly be explained by factors within the population only, but may also involve the way treatment is organized, differences in policy, professional approaches etc.

  • 29.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Magnusson, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Svensson, Johan
    Does the familial transmission of drinking patterns persist into young adulthood? A 10-year follow up2016In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 168, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Parental drinking has been shown to be associated with offspring drinking. However, the relationship appears to be more complex than often assumed and few studies have tracked it over longer time periods.

    Aims

    To explore the long-term (10-year) transmission of familial drinking during adolescence to offspring drinking patterns in young adulthood.

    Design

    Swedish longitudinal study, assessing the relationship between familial drinking in 2000 and offspring drinking in 2010 using simultaneous quantile regression analysis (n = 744).

    Data

    Data on familial drinking was gathered from the Swedish level-of-living surveys (LNU) and from partner LNU in 2000 while data on offspring drinking in young adulthood was gathered from LNU 2010. Drinking among offspring, parents and potential stepparents was measured through identical quantity-frequency indices referring to the past 12 months in 2010 and 2000 respectively.

    Results

    Young adults whose families were abstainers in 2000 drank substantially less across quintiles in 2010 than offspring of non-abstaining families. The difference, however, was not statistically significant between quintiles of the conditional distribution. Actual drinking levels in drinking families were not at all or weakly associated with drinking in offspring. Supplementary analyses confirmed these patterns.

    Conclusion

    The association between familial drinking and offspring drinking in young adulthood exhibits clear non-linear trends. Changes in the lower part of the familial drinking distribution are strongly related to drinking in young adults, but the actual levels of drinking in drinking families appear less important in shaping the drinking patterns of the offspring in young adulthood.

  • 30.
    Mats, Ekendahl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Omtanke eller misstanke?: En studie av hur ombud för Svenska Brukarföreningen beskriver substitutionsbehandling2015Report (Other academic)
  • 31. Raninen, Jonas
    et al.
    Livingston, Michael
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Leifman, Håkan
    Guttormsson, Ulf
    Svensson, Johan
    Larm, Peter
    One explanation to rule them all? Identifying sub‐groups of non‐drinking Swedish ninth graders2018In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 37, no S1, p. S42-S48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and Aims

    Researchers in a number of countries have recently identified major changes in adolescent alcohol consumption since the early 2000s, with the prevalence of teenage drinking more than halving in some countries. The major aims of the current study are to examine if there are sub‐groups among non‐drinking Swedish ninth graders and to describe how the prevalence of these groups has changed during the period 1999 to 2015.

    Design and Methods

    Data from five waves of the Swedish European School Survey Project on Alcohol and other Drugs study was used. The data covered 16 years and the total sample comprised 14 976 students. Latent class analysis was used to identify sub‐groups of non‐drinkers (n = 4267) based on parental approval towards drinking, parental monitoring, leisure time activities, school performance and use of other substances.

    Results

    Five latent classes were found: computer gamers (8.3%), strict parents (36.5%), liberal parents (27.0%), controlling but liberal parents (16.6%) and sports (11.6%). In the non‐drinking sub‐group the strict parents group increased most between 1999 and 2015.

    Discussion and Conclusions

    The results imply that there is notable within‐group diversity in non‐drinking youth. Several mechanisms and explanations are thus likely to be behind the decline in drinking participation among Swedish adolescents.

  • 32.
    Stranz, Hugo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Wiklund, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The wide-meshed safety net: Decision-making on social assistance eligibility in Sweden2017In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 711-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores and analyses, with the help of both client and social worker data on 423 applications for social assistance in Sweden, (i) the extent to which social assistance benefits and labour market strengthening measures are granted and (ii) factors concerning clients as well as social workers that are associated with the granting of benefits. Considering (i), the results show that social assistance is granted in about 74% of cases while only 6% of applicants are granted additional labour market strengthening measures. With regard to (ii), the results indicate that the granting of benefits seems to depend on abroad spectrum of factors at both the client and the social worker levels. For example, more experienced social workers are less willing to grant social assistance while chances increase when an applicant is already registered at the local public employment service and/or social insurance office. Moreover, the granting of benefits also co-varies withmore or less invariable factors at the client level: social workers are in general more generous towards women and people born outside Sweden, but rather less generous vis-à-vis single parents. The findings are discussed in terms of workfare and professionalization among social workers.

  • 33.
    Stranz, Hugo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Wiklund, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    People processing in Swedish personal social services: On the individuals, their predicaments and the outcomes of organisational screening2016In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 174-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By utilising data on nearly 1 200 individuals subject to investigations in the three Swedish personal social services (PSS) domains – child welfare (CW), social assistance (SA) and substance abuse treatment (SAT) – this article aims at describing and analysing the individuals processed in PSS as well as the outcome of the filtering process. Specific attention is paid to the extent the PSS domains differ in these respects. The main findings are: (i) a large proportion of clients subject to investigation are men, singles (most common without children in SA and SAT) and a born outside of Sweden (CW and SA). In terms of overall predicaments, SAT raw material seem more exposed than that of SA whereas there are fairly low concentration of abuse and neglect in CW; (ii) recidivism rates are high in all PSS domains: about half of the sample are already known by the agencies; (iii) out-screening are similar in SA and SAT (about 25%) but substantially higher in CW (about 50%). The investigative process is associated with considerably low external and in particular internal referring, indicating an apparent silo mentality between the PSS domains.

1 - 33 of 33
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